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John Evans

I'm a Neuroscientist. Here's How Teachers Change Kids' Brains. | EdSurge News - 2 views

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    "Teachers change brains. While we often don't think of ourselves as brain changers, when we teach we have an enormous impact on our students' cognitive development. Recent advances in educational neuroscience are helping educators understand the critical role we play in building brain capacities important to students' learning and self-control. To understand how teachers change the brain, we need to begin with a reasonably new understanding of the biology of learning. The human brain is an experience-dependent organ. Throughout our lives, the cerebrum-the largest portion of our brain-fine-tunes itself to adapt to the world around us. The scientific term used to describe this is "neuroplasticity, " which involves three processes."
John Evans

5 Habits That Keep Your Brain Young | Inc.com - 0 views

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    "We all know our chronological age. That's as simple as counting the candles on your birthday cake. But do you know your biological age? This second number measures not how many years you've seen, but how much those years have impacted the functioning of your body and brain. Scientists calculate it a number of ways, but whatever methodology they employ, they agree chronological and biological age don't always line up. Some 80-year-olds function like people decades younger. They ace their memory and cognitive tests, and scientists peering at their cells can even spot significant differences. Experts have dubbed these role models of healthy aging "superagers." Just about all of us would love to one day become one. How do you achieve that? A long and fascinating article in the latest issue of UCSF Magazine delves into the work of the University of California, San Francisco's Memory and Aging Center to answer this question (hat tip to PsyBlog). Much of this research is still far too new to be of everyday use, but science has already determined a few simple interventions you can start using today to help keep your brain young."
John Evans

ASCD Express 13.10 - Three Ways to Counter the Effects of Stress on the Brain - 1 views

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    "Stress! It's just a part of everyday life, right? But what if that stress is chronic and beyond a child's control? More than half of all students in U.S. public schools come from low-income families. Poverty is associated with chronic stress, which can have a toxic effect on the brain. While there is no silver bullet to solve the problem of poverty, we as educators do have the power to positively influence learning for children experiencing poverty by better understanding their brains."
John Evans

15 Brain Games for Kids that Will Make Them Smarter - 5 views

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    "What if I told you there is a way for your children to become better thinkers, keep their eyeballs healthy and build social skills all at the same time? Brain games will do just that!"
John Evans

How Long to Nap for the Biggest Brain Benefits - 0 views

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    "Taking a nap, we've seen time and again, is like rebooting your brain. But napping may be as much of an art as it is a science. The Wall Street Journal offers recommendations for planning your perfect nap, including how long to nap and when."
Phil Taylor

Is Technology Bad for the Teenage Brain? (Yes, No and It's Complicated.) | EdSurge News - 2 views

  • Social media, contrary to its reputation, actually seems to improve certain prosocial behaviors—empathy, to name one—in teenage populations.
  • So we have a dash of “good news,” a pinch of “bad news,” and a potential framework to turn “no news” into “know news.”
John Evans

CurioCity - CurioCité | Why is it so hard to wake up for school? - 1 views

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    "Tell me if this sounds familiar: Your alarm goes off at 7:00 am. It's a school day. It's time to get out of bed and get ready to make that early morning bell. But in that moment, you feel as though there is no force on the planet that could make you open your eyes and surrender your comfortable position under the covers. Your mom comes into the room, already dressed for work. "You know," she says, "you wouldn't be so tired if you'd just gone to bed a little earlier." Is she right? Also, why isn't she ever tired in the morning? Most teens would agree that they're much sleepier in the morning than their parents are. There's a single molecule that's largely responsible for this difference. And no, it's not caffeine - it's melatonin!"
John Evans

Boston's EMPath Program Uses Science to Fight Family Poverty - The Atlantic - 0 views

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    "You saw the pictures in science class-a profile view of the human brain, sectioned by function. The piece at the very front, right behind where a forehead would be if the brain were actually in someone's head, is the pre-frontal cortex. It handles problem-solving, goal-setting, and task execution. And it works with the limbic system, which is connected and sits closer to the center of the brain. The limbic system processes emotions and triggers emotional responses, in part because of its storage of long-term memory. When a person lives in poverty, a growing body of research suggests the limbic system is constantly sending fear and stress messages to the prefrontal cortex, which overloads its ability to solve problems, set goals, and complete tasks in the most efficient ways. This happens to everyone at some point, regardless of social class. The overload can be prompted by any number of things, including an overly stressful day at work or a family emergency. People in poverty, however, have the added burden of ever-present stress. They are constantly struggling to make ends meet and often bracing themselves against class bias that adds extra strain or even trauma to their daily lives."
John Evans

What the Flu Does to Your Brain, According to a Sick Scientist | Inverse - 0 views

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    "lu checklist: a dozen boxes of tissues, oversized sweatshirt from a college you didn't go to, an orange juice IV, three buckets (one for depositing used tissues, one full of a medley of cough drops and Nyquill, and one for when the medicine comes back up), and a general animosity toward the universe for making you feel like a sack of rotten mayonnaise. Got everything? Good. Here is exactly what's happening in your brain as you fight everyone's favorite seasonal asshole: the flu."
John Evans

Want to 'train your brain'? Forget apps, learn a musical instrument | Education | The G... - 0 views

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    "While brain training games and apps may not live up to their hype, it is well established that certain other activities and lifestyle choices can have neurological benefits that promote overall brain health and may help to keep the mind sharp as we get older. One of these is musical training. Research shows that learning to play a musical instrument is beneficial for children and adults alike, and may even be helpful to patients recovering from brain injuries. Competition: tell us your innovative transport idea… and win an iPadPro Read more "Music probably does something unique," explains neuropsychologist Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster. "It stimulates the brain in a very powerful way, because of our emotional connection with it." Playing a musical instrument is a rich and complex experience that involves integrating information from the senses of vision, hearing, and touch, as well as fine movements, and learning to do so can induce long-lasting changes in the brain. Professional musicians are highly skilled performers who spend years training, and they provide a natural laboratory in which neuroscientists can study how such changes - referred to as experience-dependent plasticity - occur across their lifespan."
John Evans

Using play to build the brain - Gooeybrains - 4 views

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    "Did you know that more than just about any other activity, play is what promotes the healthy development of your child! The most important thing to remember about play is that it should be pleasurable.  That means that if your child is having fun, then you are doing it right!  Play can use the mind, body or even props.  It engages the imagination and exercises the muscles, and it also allows our children to practice new skills. All children are curious beings.  They like to explore and play, and these behaviours usually come quite naturally to them.  Play that allows for exploration provides a sense of discovery and learning.  This discovery and learning are actually a valuable source of pleasure to the child.  They find exploring and learning fun."
John Evans

Busy brain not letting you sleep? 8 experts offer tips - CNN.com - 2 views

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    "Some nights, it's like you can't get your brain to shut up long enough for you to fall asleep. You're mentally reviewing the day you just completed while also previewing the day ahead; sometimes, your mind may even reach way back into the archives and pull up something embarrassing you did back in high school. So fun! Racing thoughts can be a sign of a serious mental health condition like anxiety. But these nights also happen to everyone from time to time -- and once we're too old for bedtime stories, it's not always clear what to do. There's no one solution that will work for everybody, of course, so instead, we've rounded up suggestions from eight sleep experts. At the very least, it's something to read next time you can't sleep"
John Evans

Understanding Dyslexia and the Reading Brain in Kids | MindShift | KQED News - 1 views

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    "At a recent talk for special education teachers at the Los Angeles Unified School District, child development professor Maryanne Wolf urged educators to say the word dyslexia out loud. "Don't ever succumb to the idea that it's going to develop out of something, or that it's a disease," she recalled telling teachers. "Dyslexia is a different brain organization that needs different teaching methods. It is never the fault of the child, but rather the responsibility of us who teach to find methods that work for that child." Wolf, who has a dyslexic son, is on a mission to spread the idea of "cerebrodiversity," the idea that our brains are not uniform and we each learn differently. Yet when it comes to school, students with different brains can often have lives filled with frustration and anguish as they, and everyone around them, struggle to figure out what is wrong with them."
John Evans

What is "brain hacking"? Tech insiders on why you should care - CBS News - 0 views

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    "Have you ever wondered if all those people you see staring intently at their smartphones -- nearly everywhere, and at all times -- are addicted to them? According to a former Google product manager you are about to hear from, Silicon Valley is engineering your phone, apps and social media to get you hooked. He is one of the few tech insiders to publicly acknowledge that the companies responsible for programming your phones are working hard to get you and your family to feel the need to check in constantly. Some programmers call it "brain hacking" and the tech world would probably prefer you didn't hear about it. But Tristan Harris openly questions the long-term consequences of it all and we think it's worth putting down your phone to listen."
John Evans

"Get Out From Behind That Computer!" Why the Brain Benefits When Students Talk and Move... - 3 views

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    "When you can get students talking and teaching each other, adding movement or gestures into the process, the students learn and retain more. Whether you call this process "Brain-Based Learning" or "Whole-Brain Learning," the concept is the same. The goal of brain-based learning is to "engage your learners and do it with strategies that are based on real science" (Jensen). Their learning increases because they are engaging more parts of their brain during the teaching process."
John Evans

These are the four stages of your brain on maths - ScienceAlert - 3 views

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    "Ever wondered how your mind deals with complex sums and multiplications? A new study has imaged how the brain's activity levels change while taking on serious maths problems, and reveals for the first time that there are four distinct neural stages involved in coming up with a solution."
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