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Weiye Loh

Why I Am Teaching a Course Called "Wasting Time on the Internet" - The New Yorker - 0 views

  • The vast amount of the Web’s language is perfect raw material for literature. Disjunctive, compressed, decontextualized, and, most important, cut-and-pastable, it’s easily reassembled into works of art.
  • What they’ve been surreptitiously doing throughout their academic career—patchwriting, cutting-and-pasting, lifting—must now be done in the open, where they are accountable for their decisions. Suddenly, new questions arise: What is it that I’m lifting? And why? What do my choices about what to appropriate tell me about myself? My emotions? My history? My biases and passions? The critiques turn toward formal improvement: Could I have swiped better material? Could my methods in constructing these texts have been better? Not surprisingly, they thrive. What I’ve learned from these years in the classroom is that no matter what we do, we can’t help but express ourselves.
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    "Web surfing as a form of self-expression. Every click is indicative of who we are: indicative of our likes, our dislikes, our emotions, our politics, our world view. Of course, marketers have long recognized this, but literature hasn't yet learned to treasure-and exploit-this situation. The idea for this class arose from my frustration with reading endless indictments of the Web for making us dumber. I've been feeling just the opposite. We're reading and writing more than we have in a generation, but we are reading and writing differently-skimming, parsing, grazing, bookmarking, forwarding, retweeting, reblogging, and spamming language-in ways that aren't yet recognized as literary."
Weiye Loh

Scientists find secret to writing a best-selling novel - Telegraph - 0 views

  • They found several trends that were often found in successful books, including heavy use of conjunctions such as “and” and “but” and large numbers of nouns and adjectives.

    Less successful work tended to include more verbs and adverbs and relied on words that explicitly describe actions and emotions such as “wanted”, “took” or “promised”, while more successful books favoured verbs that describe thought processes such as “recognised” or “remembered”.

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    "Scientists find secret to writing a best-selling novel
    Computer scientists have developed an algorithm which can predict with 84 per cent accuracy whether a book will be a commercial success - and the secret is to avoid cliches and excessive use of verbs"
Weiye Loh

BBC News - Belle de Jour's history of anonymity - 0 views

  • In the internet age, we have become increasingly concerned about the effects of anonymous online commentary. Anonymous bloggers can have enormous global audiences. "Trolls" can bring criticism straight to the computer screens of the people they disagree with. These trends are solidly in the tradition of literary anonymity - from unsigned political tracts to biting satirical graffiti, we've seen it all before.
  • the effects of anonymity are more important for the anonymous writer than they are for the audience. We'd still be dotty over Jane Austen's books if, like her contemporary audience, we never knew her name.

    The writing has enough authority and detail to carry us along in her inner world. Knowing her name, where she lived, and seeing the piecrust table where she painstakingly wrote out her manuscripts is interesting, but it's trivia. It's not what makes her novels sing.

  • Anonymous is one of our greatest writers.

    "From the medieval period to the modern period there have been authors who have enjoyed playing with and experimenting with anonymity, and it never really goes out of fashion," says Marcy North, author of The Anonymous Renaissance: Cultures of Discretion in Tudor-Stuart England.

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    "Anon was, as Virginia Woolf noted in one of her final unpublished essays, "the voice that broke the silence of the forest". Elsewhere she suggested that "Anonymous was a woman". For anonymity has definitely been widely used by women throughout the ages, whether they're writing about relationships, sex or anything else.

    Without Anonymous, there are so many classics we would not have had - Gawain and the Green Knight, virtually all of the Bible and other religious texts.

    Anon is allowed a greater creative freedom than a named writer is, greater political influence than a common man can ever attain, and far more longevity than we would guess.

    Obviously, I'm a great fan of Anon's work, but then, as a formerly anonymous author, I would say that, wouldn't I?"
Weiye Loh

Balderdash: The Writing of Fiction - 0 views

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    True originality consists not in a new manner but in a new vision. That new, that personal, vision is attained only by looking long enough at the object represented to make it the writer's own; and the mind which would bring this secret germ to fruition must be able to nourish it with an accumulated wealth of knowledge and experience. To know any one thing one must not only know something of a great many others, but also, as Matthew Arnold long since pointed out, a great deal more of one's immediate subject than any partial presentation of it visibly includes
Derrick Clements

You Should Spend 4-6 Hours Writing a Blog Post - 1 views

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    Interesting take from an awesome blogger.  He talks about how really time-consuming posts have brought him lots of visitors.
Weiye Loh

Basic Training | Futility Closet - 0 views

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    "Those were the best rules I ever learned for the business of writing," Hemingway told a reporter in 1940. "I've never forgotten them. No man with any talent, who feels and writes truly about the thing he is trying to say, can fail to write well if he abides with them."
Gideon Burton

Writing About Literature in the Digital Age : Gideon Burton, Alymarie Rutter, Amy Whita... - 1 views

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    The link to where we can download our eBook: Writing about LIterature in the Digital Age
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    This page archives and makes the many formats available for Writing About Literature in the Digital Age
Sam McGrath

10 Writing Tips for a Winning Web Site - 3 views

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    This might have been good at the beginning of the semester. I guess for those of us who will keep blogging it can still help us out.
Gideon Burton

Troy Hicks on Digital Writing - 0 views

  • We'll talk about how to apply digital writing skills effectively in the classroom, since many students may be adept at text messaging and communicating online but do not know how to craft a basic essay. Troy will also discuss how best to integrate new technologies into writing instruction.
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    Educational leader Steve Hargadon is conducting a webinar with Troy Hicks on the topic of Digital Writing. This was recommended by a prior student, Ben Miller.
Sam McGrath

BoomWriter - Schools - 1 views

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    This is an interesting online tool to help students develop their writing skills and maybe even learn to love it. It makes assignments much more relevant.
Ashley Nelson

Unleash Your Imagination - FanFiction.Net - 0 views

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    A website that is dedicated to making sure that you got the ending you wanted to your favorite show. People can write and make up stories using characters that have already been created like Harry Potter or Batman.
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    This is the site that I refer to in my blog.
Nyssa Silvester

Red Lemonade | The future of publishing begins with you - and it starts here, right now. - 0 views

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    Site that brings readers, writers, and editors together to collaborate.
Nyssa Silvester

The Business Rusch Publishing Series | Kristine Kathryn Rusch - 0 views

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    For anyone who wants to get an extended analysis about the effects of the Digital Age on publishing, this is a great place to start if you have the time.
Weiye Loh

A `Bad Writer' Bites Back - 0 views

  • The journal, Philosophy and Literature, has offered itself as the arbiter of good prose and accused some of us of bad writing by awarding us "prizes."
  • The targets, however, have been restricted to scholars on the left whose work focuses on topics like sexuality, race, nationalism and the workings of capitalism -- a point the news media ignored. Still, the whole exercise hints at a serious question about the relation of language and politics: why are some of the most trenchant social criticisms often expressed through difficult and demanding language?
  • scholars in the humanities should be able to clarify how their work informs and illuminates everyday life. Equally, however, such scholars are obliged to question common sense, interrogate its tacit presumptions and provoke new ways of looking at a familiar world.
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    A `Bad Writer' Bites Back

    By JUDITH BUTLER
Ben M

BBC NEWS | Technology | Berners-Lee on the read/write web - 1 views

  • Well in some ways. The idea was that anybody who used the web would have a space where they could write and so the first browser was an editor, it was a writer as well as a reader. Every person who used the web had the ability to write something. It was very easy to make a new web page and comment on what somebody else had written, which is very much what blogging is about.
  • For years I had been trying to address the fact that the web for most people wasn't a creative space; there were other editors, but editing web pages became difficult and complicated for people. What happened with blogs and with wikis, these editable web spaces, was that they became much more simple.

    When you write a blog, you don't write complicated hypertext, you just write text, so I'm very, very happy to see that now it's gone in the direction of becoming more of a creative medium.

  • I feel that we need to individually work on putting good things on it, finding ways to protect ourselves from accidentally finding the bad stuff, and that at the end of the day, a lot of the problems of bad information out there, things that you don't like, are problems with humanity.
    • Heather D
       
      This reminds me of how I think the Church uses these tools. Yes, the internet can be used for not-so-good things...but ultimately, it can be used and is meant to be used to expand the Church's work.
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  • My hope is that it'll be very positive in bringing people together around the planet, because it'll make communication between different countries more possible.
    • Ben M
       
      Reminds me of Robert and his ham radio friends all over the world
  • building of something very new and special,
    • Ben M
       
      a cathedral!
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    The man who launched the very first website talks about the way blogs and wikis have realized his initial vision of the web as a space for participatory creativity (and writing in particular)
Gideon Burton

The ICT Enhanced Iterative Writing Process on Flickr - Photo Sharing! - 0 views

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    An interesting diagram conceptualizing the writing process as mediated through various electronic technologies.
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