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Kevin Makice

The menace of memes: How pictures can paint a thousand lies - 0 views

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    It is quite easy to end up writing about the problems with parliament and the failings of politicians. Our assumption tends to be that the problems with politics today lie solely in Westminster. But these memes show that mendacity is found outside SW1 as well as in it. If we must hold our politicians in revulsion - rather than recognising that they're no more (or less) flawed than the rest of us - then we should at least also hold those who create these totally inaccurate graphics in even lower esteem.
Kevin Makice

This University Teaches You No Skills-Just a New Way to Think - 0 views

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    Ben Nelson says the primary purpose of a university isn't to prepare students for a career. It's to prepare them for life. And he now has $70 million to prove his point.

    Nelson is the founder and CEO of a new experiment in higher education called Minerva Project. He says when it comes to learning, job training is the easy part. With the emergence of online courses, it's easier and cheaper than ever to acquire the hard skills you need to land a job. "Why would you spend a quarter of a million dollars and four years to learn to code in Python?" he says. "If that's the role of universities, you'd have to be insane to go to universities."
Kevin Makice

15 Reasons to Keep Your Company Small - 0 views

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    Despite all the headlines about billion-dollar exits and IPOs, growing too quickly or too much is not always the most desirable outcome for a startup.

    Fifteen entrepreneurs, members of Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC), offer their perspective on why, in some cases, smaller means mightier.
Kevin Makice

Oreo's Dunk in the Dark Super Bowl tweet 'a huge win' and 'a huge failure' - 0 views

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    Oreo's Dunk in the Dark Super Bowl viral tweet was 'a big win' but also 'a big failure' according to Mondelez VP of global media and consumer engagement, Bonin Bough.
Kevin Makice

Once upon a time, newspapers were 'social media' - 0 views

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    Centuries before Twitter, Facebook and the enthusiasm for hyperlocal journalism, social media was enjoying popularity in a British colony across the Atlantic.

    And the bearers of this media revolution were, of course, newspapers.

    Tom Standage, digital editor of The Economist, points out in a Medium post that one of the United States' founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin, played a part in social media's history.
Kevin Makice

Facebook may be working on a 'sympathize' button to support somber updates - 0 views

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    If you've ever felt strange "Liking" a status concerning the death of a pet or other gloomy news on Facebook, you may be able to voice your support in a more appropriate way soon. According to The Telegraph, the social network has a "Sympathize" button in the works that can be used when the original function isn't exactly the best. The new item is the product of a recent hackathon event and will be tied to emotions tagged within updates to indicate the somber mood -- only appearing in those specified instances."
Kevin Makice

Are Emoticons the Future of Language? - 0 views

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    In the digital age, we increasingly use written language in place of face to face chat or phone calls. But the advantages email, chat, and text give us in speed come with limitations in communicating emotional tone. Enter emoticons and emojis. Not just a playful supplement to language, these new tools allow for complexity in tone and emotion never before possible in written language, as well as provide new opportunities for creative expression. Rapidly spreading throughout culture, emoticons and emojis fill a void in written language that few realized we so desperately needed.
Kevin Makice

The Threat of Reading: If video games came first - 0 views

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    "I know you're not a reader but man, you'd love this." It was pointless saying so but I couldn't help myself. I'd fallen head long again, deep into a story I didn't have to overhear or construct for myself. I was spending hours in my own little world, happily away from the enforced gaming I resisted at school - supposedly classical games that would make us better people.
Kevin Makice

Why Do Whistle-Blowers Become Whistle-Blowers? : NPR - 0 views

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    Management gurus have long preached the value of ethical leadership. In the presence of ethical leadership - but the absence of ethical co-workers - what happens to people's honesty?
Kevin Makice

Why you should care about your local hackerspace - 0 views

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    "Open centers of grassroots innovation, hackerspaces offer opportunities to source talent, create goodwill, and push technology forward"
Kevin Makice

Benefits of professional development are similar both online and face-to-face - 0 views

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    "Done well, on-line professional development is as effective as face-to-face professional development.  These results are promising for our CSLearning4U project. In particular, the benefit that Barry Fishman saw is what we were most hoping for, based on our studies with Klara Benda - it's all about fitting into the teachers' lives."
Kevin Makice

Companies look at wrong things when using Facebook to screen job applicants - 0 views

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    "Employers are increasingly using Facebook to screen job applicants and weed out candidates they think have undesirable traits. But a new study from North Carolina State University shows that those companies may have a fundamental misunderstanding of online behavior and, as a result, may be eliminating desirable job candidates."
christian briggs

MIT panelists: Big data calls for data-driven decision making skills - 0 views

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    "Organizations need to develop data-driven decision making skills to capitalize on new and emerging big data technologies"
Kevin Makice

IU saves nearly $20 million with open source financial system: IU News Room: Indiana Un... - 0 views

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    Indiana University has saved nearly $20 million by joining with other universities to reduce administrative costs for essential financial software systems.




    The Kuali Financial System is open source software that was created to fit the needs of colleges and universities. By definition, open source software is free to use, distribute and modify, meaning IU avoids the costs of licensing expensive commercial systems that often cost tens of millions of dollars to buy and install. IU fully implemented and transitioned to the Kuali System in February.
christian briggs

Digital divide persists in Canada, both in access and Internet fluency | canada.com - 0 views

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    Digital divide persists in Canada, both in access and Internet fluency
christian briggs

What Teens Get About the Internet That Parents Don't - Mimi Ito - The Atlantic - 0 views

  • Parents more often than not have a negative view of the role of the Internet in learning, and young people almost always have a positive one.
  • Young people are desperate for learning that is relevant and part of the fabric of their social lives, where they are making choices about how, when, and what to learn, without it all being mapped for them in advance. Learning on the Internet is about posting a burning question on a forum like Quora or Stack Exchange, searching for a how to video on YouTube or Vimeo, or browsing a site like Instructables, Skillshare, and Mentormob for a new project to pick up. It's not just professors who have something to share, but everyone who has knowledge and skills.
  • The Internet and her friends have offered my daughter a lifeline to explore new interests that are not just about the resume and getting ahead of everyone else. In today's high-pressure climate for teens, the Internet is feeling more and more like one of the few havens they can find for the lessons that matter most.
christian briggs

Data from social networks are making social science more scientific. (via @TheEconomist) - 0 views

  • Alessandro Vespignani, one of Dr Song’s colleagues at Northeastern, discussed what might be done with such knowledge. Dr Vespignani, another moonlighting physicist, studies epidemiology. He and his team have created a program called GLEAM (Global Epidemic and Mobility Model) that divides the world into hundreds of thousands of squares. It models travel patterns between these squares (busy roads, flight paths and so on) using equations based on data as various as international air links and school holidays.

    The result is impressive. In 2009, for example, there was an outbreak of a strain of influenza called H1N1. GLEAM mimicked what actually happened with great fidelity. In most countries it calculated to within a week when the number of new infections peaked. In no case was the calculation out by more than a fortnight

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    Data from social networks are making social science more scientific (via @TheEconomist)
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