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John Evans

Why It's Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill | ... - 1 views

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    "Friday March 14 is the 135th anniversary of Albert Einstein's birthday, a good time to think about the importance of asking questions. This was a big theme for Einstein, who told us, "The important thing is not to stop questioning," while also urging us to question everything and "Never lose a holy curiosity."

    Einstein understood that questioning is critical to learning and solving problems. If he were alive today, Einstein would see a world in which questioning has become more important than ever before. But he might also be left wondering why, for the most part, we still don't encourage questioning or teach it to our children."
John Evans

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change.

    That makes it a most precious "app" today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don't seem to value questioning as much as we should. For the most part, in our workplaces as well as our classrooms, it is the answers we reward -- while the questions are barely tolerated.

    To change that is easier said than done. Working within an answers-based education system, and in a culture where questioning may be seen as a sign of weakness, teachers must go out of their way to create conditions conducive to inquiry. Here are some suggestions (based on input from question-friendly teachers, schools, programs, and organizations) on how to encourage more questioning in the classroom and hopefully, beyond it."
John Evans

8 ways teachers can talk less and get kids talking more | The Cornerstone - 1 views

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    "On Twitter, I recently shared an excellent article by Justin Tarte called 5 Questions Every Teacher Should Ask Him/Herself. The first reflection question Justin recommends is:

    Who is doing a majority of the talking in your classroom? It's the person who is doing the majority of the talking that tends to do the most learning, so what is the teacher/student talking ratio in your classroom? If you find yourself always talking more than your students, try and figure out some ways to empower your students so they are more involved in the learning."
John Evans

A Must Have Questioning Toolkit for Teachers and Educators ~ Educational Technology and... - 4 views

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    "Here is a great resource I have recently stumbled upon and never had the chance to share it here till this evening. A Questioning Toolkit is a comprehensive guide to help teachers, educators, and curriculum designers better integrate the power of questions in learning and instruction. This resource contains a plethora of question types with explanations on each of these types together with examples and tips on how to use each of them. I have gone through the materials presented in this guide and I must say that it is really a treasure trove of educational insights for immediate application in classrooms."
Phil Taylor

- Create a Culture of Questioning and Inquiry - 7 views

  • shift from a culture of compliance, to a culture of questioning in your classroom
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    " shift from a culture of compliance, to a culture of questioning in your classroom"
John Evans

The Electric Educator: Google-Proof Questioning: A New Use for Bloom's Taxonomy - 8 views

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    "The internet has revolutionized information collection. The answer to virtually any question or problem is at our fingertips. Google has made this possible.

    While I am a great admirer of Google and an avid user of its products, in a way, Google has made my life as a teacher a LOT more difficult. Let me explain. In the "old days" (that would be pre-internet) when a teacher assigned a worksheet with a series of questions on it students had a few options to get the answers.

    1. Ask mom.
    2. If mom doesn't know, ask Dad.
    3. If Dad doesn't know look it up in the textbook.
    4. If the answer isn't in the textbook, give up."
John Evans

Learners Should Be Developing Their Own Essential Questions | User Generated Education - 0 views

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    "Having essential questions drive curriculum and learning has become core to many educator's instructional practices. "
John Evans

Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking | Edutopia - 8 views

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    "Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some concrete ways you can begin leveraging your students' critical-thinking skills in the classroom and beyond. "
Phil Taylor

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer | MindShift - 10 views

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    "What would happen if the roles were flipped and students asked the questions?"
Phil Taylor

On Ed Tech, We're Asking the Wrong Question | The Committed Sardine - 7 views

  • In the end, that’s all technology is, too—a resource. In the hands of talented and well-trained teachers, it can facilitate high-quality teaching and learning; when used by average teachers, it most likely will lead to average results. And in either case, it’s not entirely clear whether test scores would rise, anyway—for reasons I’ll discuss later.
  • There is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that, when used wisely, technology is a powerful resource that can help boost achievement.
  • I would argue that’s the point: You can’t separate the technology from the rest of the learning process, because they are inextricably bound.
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  • But technology doesn’t exist in a vacuum. For technology to have an impact on student achievement, schools also need sound teaching, strong leadership, fidelity of use, and a supportive culture, among other things.
  • Among schools with one-to-one computing programs, 70 percent reported their students’ achievement scores on high-stakes tests were on the rise. But this figure was 85 percent for schools that employed certain strategies for success, including the use of electronic formative assessments on a regular basis, frequent collaboration of teachers in professional learning communities, and—most importantly—strong principal and school district leadership.
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