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Nigel Coutts

What might our children most need from Education? - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    In these times of Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity (VUCA), in this Post Truth era, what do our children most need from their education? How do we best prepare them for their future?
John Evans

Project Torino - Microsoft Research - 0 views

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    "An inclusive physical programming language for children with vision impairments"
John Evans

Children shouldn't learn to code. Ultimately, machines will be better | WIRED UK - 0 views

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    Machines are already superintelligent on many axes, including memory and processing speed. Unfortunately, those are the attributes our education system currently rewards, with an emphasis on learning by rote.

    It doesn't make sense to me. Part of my job as an investor is to attempt to predict the future - I need to make bets on the way we'll be behaving in the next two, five, ten and 20 years. Computers already store facts faster and better than we do, but struggle to perfect things we learn as toddlers, such as dexterity and walking.

    We need to rethink the way we teach our children and the things we teach them. Creativity will be increasingly be the defining human talent. Our education system should emphasise the use of human imagination to spark original ideas and create new meaning. It's the one thing machines won't be able to do.
John Evans

The Future of Work: Will Our Children Be Prepared? - YouTube - 1 views

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    "A test-driven standardized model of education trains children for a world that no longer exists. Accelerating advances in technology are eliminating any job that is routine, leaving millions of young adults vulnerable. This is the Future of Work? What do we need to do to prepare children for this world?"
John Evans

Why children should be taught to build a positive online presence - 1 views

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    "Rather than just teaching children about internet safety and reducing their digital footprint, we should also encourage them to curate a positive digital footprint which will be an asset for them in their future.

    Today's children are prolific users of the internet. Concern has been raised about the future impact of the digital footprints they are generating. While much discussion of this issue focuses on keeping children safe, little is known about how children manage their digital footprints.

    While digital footprints are considered to be a liability, if managed well they can be an asset. Digital footprints can showcase identity, skills and interests. This is important in an era where employers "google" candidates to check their identity and verify their suitability. In this context, having no digital footprint can be as much of a disadvantage as having a poorly managed one.

    The "Best Footprint Forward" project explored what children know about digital footprints. Focus groups were made up of 33 children aged 10-12 years from three schools in regional NSW. Analysis of the focus groups reveals children have strategies to keep safe online, but they need further guidance on how to build a positive digital footprint."
John Evans

Why Chinese children are better at math than Americans - Business Insider - 1 views

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    "For the most part, American children aren't great at math.

    But Chinese children tend to be excellent.

    Testing half a million students worldwide, the Program for International Student Assessment is one of the most widely cited measurements of global education, and it's consistently found Chinese students at the top of the academic pile ... and Americans much nearer the bottom. Some experts argue that the PISA assessment, like any standardized tests, primarily measures a student's ability to take the test, not their knowledge, but hardly anyone disputes that the American education has some work to do when it comes to math. 

    In Lenora Chu's new book "Little Soldiers: An American Boy, a Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve," she begins to unearth the cultural differences that lead to this gap - and it's not just about what happens at school."
John Evans

Will Robots Take Our Children's Jobs? - The New York Times - 1 views

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    "Like a lot of children, my sons, Toby, 7, and Anton, 4, are obsessed with robots. In the children's books they devour at bedtime, happy, helpful robots pop up more often than even dragons or dinosaurs. The other day I asked Toby why children like robots so much.

    "Because they work for you," he said.

    What I didn't have the heart to tell him is, someday he might work for them - or, I fear, might not work at all, because of them.

    It is not just Elon Musk, Bill Gates and Stephen Hawking who are freaking out about the rise of invincible machines. Yes, robots have the potential to outsmart us and destroy the human race. But first, artificial intelligence could make countless professions obsolete by the time my sons reach their 20s."
John Evans

How To Make Your Kids Smarter: 10 Steps Backed By Science | Time.com - 0 views

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    "I've explored the science behind what makes kids happier, what type of parenting works best and what makes for joyful families.
    But what makes children - from babies up through the teen years - smarter?
    Here are 10 things science says can help:"
John Evans

"Kids Can't Learn From Teachers They Don't Like" - 0 views

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    "The following TEDTalk by Rita Pierson reminds us of why we all got involved in teaching to begin with.

    While curriculum, assessment, and instructional design may be how you parse your thinking now, at one point it probably had more to do with content, curiosity, and relationships. In this talk, the 40-year veteran teacher reminds us that not only do relationships matters, sometimes they're all that matters."
John Evans

Alternative Limb Project Offers Children Cheap 3D Printed Prosthetics | All3DP - 0 views

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    "8-year-old Kaori Misue was born without fingers. Usually, creating specialized prosthetics costs upwards of $15,000. However, thanks to a 21-year-old inventor, Misue received a prosthetic hand which has changed her life.

    Gino Tubaro is offering kids born without limbs the chance to receive a cheap 3D printed prosthetic. Misue's mother, Karina Misue, adds: "It was magical… The confidence it gives kids is tremendous. They're using it with pride."

    Tubaro's 3D printed prosthetic designs are part of the "Alternative Limbs Project", which began in his home of Argentina. The prints come in a range of designs, offering users the chance to decide what they need the prosthetic for most, whether it's playing an instrument or ping-pong. The prosthetics for kids can even be superhero themed (and shoot rubber bands)."
John Evans

Is our smartphone addiction damaging our children? | Rowan Davies | Opinion | The Guardian - 2 views

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    "Astudy published by the journal Child Development has taken a look at how parents' use of technology affects their children's behaviour, and has concluded that "technology-based interruptions in parent-child interactions" - a phenomenon known as "technoference", which I'm fairly sure was a club night in Stockwell in the 1990s - could be associated with a greater incidence of poor behaviour on the part of children.

    Almost half (48%) of the parents in the study admitted to three daily incidents of technoference in their interactions with their kids, and the researchers say that these seem to correlate with young children being more prone to whining, sulking, restlessness, frustration and outbursts of temper. (Coincidentally, these are also the behaviours displayed by adults who are confronted with slow wifi.)"
John Evans

Play is essential, but it takes work for children to succeed in the real world | Tom Be... - 3 views

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    "The announcement that the University of Cambridge has appointed the world's first Lego professor of play gives new meaning to the phrase "red-brick university". Professor Paul Ramchandani will lead a team "examining the importance of play in education". And, presumably, building awesome spaceships that turn into Durham Cathedral.

    I have a one-year-old son who might agree; try as I might, I just cannot get him to recite Homer or parse a sonnet. I have, however, watched in childish joy as he tumbles through Duplo and teddy mountains, rolling in grass like an explorer on a new planet. It is a new planet - new to him. All he wants to do, it seems, is play."
John Evans

Make-believe play boosts creative thinking in children: study | CTV News - 2 views

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    "New U.K. research from has found that make-believe fantasy play could boost children's creative thinking.
    Carried out by researchers from Oxford Brookes University, the team presented their findings at the British Psychological Society's Developmental Psychology Section annual conference in Belfast, Northern Ireland."
John Evans

Physical Activity Primes Children's Brains For Academic Excellence, Finds Study - 1 views

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    "In a new report, 24 researchers from eight different countries gathered to create a consensus on the impact of physical activity on kids' health. They focused primarily on studies that examined the health of children aged 6 to 18, and analyzed the effects of exercise on children's fitness, health, cognitive function, motivation, and mental and social health. The report defines physical activity as "an overarching term that consists of many structured and unstructured forms within school and out-of-school-time contexts, including organized sports, physical education, outdoor recreation, motor skill development programs, recess, and active transportation such as biking and walking."

    In short, they found that exercise was beneficial for nearly every aspect of a child's wellbeing: physical health, cognitive ability, motivation and psychological wellbeing, as well as social inclusion. First, exercise leads to improved cardiorespiratory fitness, which in turn improves brain development and intellect, they said."
John Evans

Free Technology for Teachers: 6000+ Children's Books Available for Free - 1 views

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    "The University of Florida's Digital Collections offers a huge library of digitized children's books. Thanks to Open Culture I discovered this collection this afternoon and immediately started to browse through it. The books that you will find in the collection consist of works that are in the public domain. You can search for books according to topic, language, publisher, genre, and publication date.

    All of the children's books in the collection can be read online. Reading the books online could be a bit difficult for some as there is a border with menus surrounding each page of the books. To avoid that, you can print all of the books for free. The printed version does not display anything but the book as it was scanned."
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