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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Roger Gardner

Roger Gardner

Sharing a list with a group so that they can add bookmarks to the list - 674 views

lists groups sharing Diigolet suggestion educator help review
  • Roger Gardner
     
    Hi there
    Have been using Diigo for a while now and I really like it!

    Does anyone know if it is possible to share a list with a group so that they can not only view the bookmarks in the list, but also add new ones to that shared list?

    Thanks for any advice

    Roger
  • ...2 more comments...
  • Roger Gardner
     
    Thanks for that, Scott. It's a pity in my opinion that lists cannot be collaborative. We were looking for a model whereby a group of students share and annotate bookmarks which are categorised in lists. We're using groups anyway so will carry on with that.

    Scott Allam wrote:
    > Well, assuming the list has not been defined as private, you can share the URL pointing to your Diigo list directly or create a bookmark of the URL and share the bookmark, such as:
    > http://www.diigo.com/list/bytesize/web-20-software
    >
    > points to my public list I have created for Web 2.0 software.
    >
    > Lists, however, are not collaborative in nature. If you are looking to have something where each of the individuals can contribute and add their own bookmarks, then create a new Group: http://groups.diigo.com/create and invite those members to join.
  • Roger Gardner
     
    Hi Graham

    Thanks for your reply. My post was actually on behalf of a colleague, and I have passed your idea on to her. The only possible problem with it is that many of our students use the Diigolet button as they are unable currently to install the Diigo toolbar because of PCs on campus being locked down. I'm not sure that group tag dictionaries work with the Diigolet option.


    Graham Perrin wrote:
    > > a group of students
    >
    > I guess that you're already aware of Diigo Educator Accounts,
    > http://blog.diigo.com/2008/09/19/announcing-diigo-educator-accounts/
    >
    > > share and annotate bookmarks which are categorised in
    > > lists. We're using groups
    >
    > Whilst Diigo groups don't have lists, you might populate group tag dictionaries e.g.
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=eatbath
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=edtechtalk
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=social-bookmarking-seminar-group
    > with multiple-word tags that match the names of your required lists. I see that one of the dictionaries is already populated :)
    >
    > I understand that the notion of a group-specific list is appealing, and that tags are not a panacea, but please:
    >
    > * de-focusing for a moment from Diigo, and from computers generally, what end result(s) would you like your students to achieve?
  • Roger Gardner
     
    Hi Graham

    This is on behalf of a colleague. The context is a course in which participants and facilitators are bookmarking and annotating literature sources they come across. The course has a number of units of study for which Diigo groups have been set up (not all participants take all units, so they can join the relevant groups). The lists are then intended for topics within each unit. My colleague describes it as follows:

    "I'm thinking that they will want a sort of peer reviewed source of literature to dip into (Lists do it for me here) and they may come across stuff they want to share now and again with the group - they can of course create their own lists if they really get into things!"

    An online tool is attractive as the participants are from different departments and will not necessarily see each other F2F often. We did,as I have said, investigate the Group tags Dictionary in the first instance, but many participants are using the Diigolet button and this functionality didn't appear to be available.

    Cheers

    Roger





    Graham Perrin wrote:
    > > a group of students
    >
    > I guess that you're already aware of Diigo Educator Accounts,
    > http://blog.diigo.com/2008/09/19/announcing-diigo-educator-accounts/
    >
    > > share and annotate bookmarks which are categorised in
    > > lists. We're using groups
    >
    > Whilst Diigo groups don't have lists, you might populate group tag dictionaries e.g.
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=eatbath
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=edtechtalk
    > http://groups.diigo.com/tag_mana/group_tag_dict?group_name=social-bookmarking-seminar-group
    > with multiple-word tags that match the names of your required lists. I see that one of the dictionaries is already populated :)
    >
    > I understand that the notion of a group-specific list is appealing, and that tags are not a panacea, but please:
    >
    > * de-focusing for a moment from Diigo, and from computers generally, what end result(s) would you like your students to achieve?
  • Roger Gardner
     
    hi Scott

    Thanks for that suggestion. We will try it out. Sorry if this appears a stupid question but I just need to clarify something (probably this is due to terminology!)

    Is the following correct? These groups are not in actual fact nested (as in they don't have a "parent / child" relationship - they are in a flat structure, but linked .) So when a participant bookmarks something for a "sub-group" it just appears as "a group" in the "share to a group" drop down in their bookmark window.

    Thanks

    Roger


    Scott Allam wrote:
    > In that case, I would set up a series of nested groups.
    >
    > First create a master group, call it Literature. In the Group Forum portion of that group, insert comments on how to use the nesting of groups. Then in the group bookmarks, insert bookmarks to sub-groups, one sub-group per unit. Make it clear that this "literature research" group is an admin only group for organization only so that none of the participants alter the group. If you are really concerned about members messing with the organization, then you can create a single top level HTML page that then points to the sub-groups. Another alternative would be to create Diigo lists using your account (as these are not editable by other than you and will provide a stable jump off point) for all of the top level items that will then point to collaborative sub-groups.
    >
    > Top level literature page {not collaborative, meant for information only}
    > > > > Unit 1 Group
    > > > >| > > >Topic 1-1 {these are collaborative Diigo groups}
    > > > >| > > >Topic 1-2
    > > > >| > > >Topic 1-3
    > > > >| > > >Etc.
    > > > > Unit 2 Group
    > > > >| > > >Topic 2-1
    > > > >| > > >Topic 2-2
    >
    > The good part about this solution is it can be expanded as units and topics grow and administered at each level. If this is something of interest, drop me an e-mail, I would be happy to help you set up a structure, such as this scott_gui@yahoo.com
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