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Jamie Camp

Goal setting: of distractions and staying yar | Not So Distant Future - 5 views

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    Wow. How hard it is to keep all the balls in the air--and to decide which ones you should just let drop!
Lissa Davies

Listening, Learning, Leading: Rewriting the Story of Library Through Particip... - 0 views

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    Buffy Hamilton's slideshare about participatory librarianship. 
Debra Gottsleben

My response to an ASCD EL article - Teaching the iGeneration - Bloomfield Hills, MI, Un... - 0 views

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    Another great piece on the role of the school librarian.
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    Great article about the importance of school libraries!
beth gourley

Gutenberg 2.0 | Harvard Magazine May-Jun 2010 - 10 views

  • Her staff offers a complete suite of information services to students and faculty members, spread across four teams. One provides content or access to it in all its manifestations; another manages and curates information relevant to the school’s activities; the third creates Web products that support teaching, research, and publication; and the fourth group is dedicated to student and faculty research and course support. Kennedy sees libraries as belonging to a partnership of shared services that support professors and students. “Faculty don’t come just to libraries [for knowledge services],” she points out. “They consult with experts in academic computing, and they participate in teaching teams to improve pedagogy. We’re all part of the same partnership and we have to figure out how to work better together.”
  • It’s not that we don’t need libraries or librarians,” he continues, “it’s that what we need them for is slightly different. We need them to be guides in this increasingly complex world of information and we need them to convey skills that most kids actually aren’t getting at early ages in their education. I think librarians need to get in front of this mob and call it a parade, to actually help shape it.”
  • Her staff offers a complete suite of information services to students and faculty members, spread across four teams. One provides content or access to it in all its manifestations; another manages and curates information relevant to the school’s activities; the third creates Web products that support teaching, research, and publication; and the fourth group is dedicated to student and faculty research and course support. Kennedy sees libraries as belonging to a partnership of shared services that support professors and students. “Faculty don’t come just to libraries [for knowledge services],” she points out. “They consult with experts in academic computing, and they participate in teaching teams to improve pedagogy. We’re all part of the same partnership and we have to figure out how to work better together.”
    • beth gourley
       
      Good summary of differentiating library services and the need to accommodate staffing. Ultimatley makes for the teaching partnership.
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  • “The digital world of content is going to be overwhelming for librarians for a long time, just because there is so much,” she acknowledges. Therefore, librarians need to teach students not only how to search, but “how to think critically about what they have found…what they are missing… and how to judge their sources.” 
  • But making comparisons between digital and analog libraries on issues of cost or use or preservation is not straightforward. If students want to read a book cover to cover, the printed copy may be deemed superior with respect to “bed, bath and beach,” John Palfrey points out. If they just want to read a few pages for class, or mine the book for scattered references to a single subject, the digital version’s searchability could be more appealing; alternatively, students can request scans of the pages or chapter they want to read as part of a program called “scan and deliver” (in use at the HD and other Harvard libraries) and receive a link to images of the pages via e-mail within four days. 
  • (POD) would allow libraries to change their collection strategies: they could buy and print a physical copy of a book only if a user requested it. When the user was done with the book, it would be shelved. It’s a vision of “doing libraries ‘just in time’ rather than ‘just in case,’” says Palfrey. (At the Harvard Book Store on Massachusetts Avenue, a POD machine dubbed Paige M. Gutenborg is already in use. Find something you like in Google’s database of public-domain books—perhaps one provided by Harvard—and for $8 you can own a copy, printed and bound before your wondering eyes in minutes. Clear Plexiglas allows patrons to watch the process—hot glue, guillotine-like trimming blades, and all—until the book is ejected, like a gumball, from a chute at the bottom.)
  • We’re rethinking the physical spaces to accommodate more of the type of learning that is expected now, the types of assignments that faculty are making, that have two or three students huddled around a computer working together, talking.” 
  • Libraries are also being used as social spaces,
  • In terms of research, students are asking each other for information more now than in the past, when they might have asked a librarian.
  • On the contrary, the whole history of books and communication shows that one medium does not displace another.
  • it’s not just a service organization. I would even go so far as to call it the nervous system of our corporate body.”
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    "This defines a new role for librarians as database experts and teachers, while the library becomes a place for learning about sophisticated search for specialized information."
    "How do we make information as useful as possible to our community now and over a long period of time?"
beth gourley

Technology is the campfire around which we tell our stories - 0 views

  • The man shrugged and replied, �In a year, the king may die. In a year, I may die. In a year, the horse may talk!�
  • Technology is the campfire around which we tell our stories.
  • connects the information people and the story people
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  • May 15, 1924 issue of Library Journal, Helen E. Haines wrote about contemporary fiction
  • It offers constant problems and perplexities
  • strong role in domesticating
  • Booklist, Bill Ott, likes to say that librarians are divided into information people and story people
  • Librarians, historically, have been at the place where new formats and new technologies happen to people in their daily lives.
  • argued between those who consider all fiction foul or useless and those who see no harm in it at all
  • even the best of writings are but a reminiscence of what we know, and that only in principles of justice and goodness and nobility taught and communicated orally
    • beth gourley
       
      I thought perhaps she would extend the You-Tube example back to the oral and getting away from the written word
  • change is our only certainty
  • Plato was concerned that the new-fangled idea of writing stuff down would dilute scholarship and make men lazy
  • Jamie Larue, director of the Douglas Public Library in Castle Rock, Colorado, calls librarians �the keepers of the books, the answerers of questions, and the tellers of tales.
  • librarianship is the connecting of people to ideas
  • Le Guin's words remind me of is how important it is to keep ideas that we do not comprehend, or believe in, or agree with; to keep them safe, and to keep them available. If librarians don't do this, who will? There is no other profession enjoined to preserve and disseminate all the truths of humankind that is our job.
  • also need to remember that some ideas thought worthless today may turn out to be the bedrock of tomorrow's truths
  • available not just good ideas and noble ideas, but bad ideas and silly ideas and yes, even dangerous and wicked ideas.
  • Our job is to keep ideas and make them available.
  • readers need to have available to them truth in all its myriad guises, light and dark, easy and difficult
  • core values of librarianship are access and service
  • always like to mention a few books that I think my audiences would enjoy
  • Susan Patron's The Higher Power of Lucky.
  • Guy Gavriel Kay's Ysabel
  • nformation person and a story person
  • Technology is our campfire. Change is what happens:
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    ©2007 GraceAnne Andreassi DeCandido MLS
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