Skip to main content

Home/ LearningwithComputers/ Group items matching "learning" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Paul Beaufait

Half an Hour: The Future of Online Learning: Ten Years On - 0 views

  • While we want to provide personalized attention, especially to submitted work, testing and grading, learning is still heavily dependent on the teacher. But because the teacher in turn is responsible for assembling, and often presenting, the materials to be learned, customization and personalization have not been practical. So we have adopted a model where small groups of people form a cohort, thus allowing the teacher to present the same material to more than one person at a time, while offering individualized interaction and assessment.
  • Though networks have always existed, modern communications technologies highlight their existence and given them a new robustness. Networks are distinct from groups in that they preserve individual autonomy and promote diversity of belief, purpose and methodology. In a network, however, people do not act as disassociated individuals, but rather, cooperate in a series of exchanges that can produce, not merely individual goods, but also social goods.
  • In the case of informal learning, however, the structure is much looser. People pursue their own objectives in their own way, while at the same time initiating and sustaining an ongoing dialogue with others pursuing similar objectives. Learning and discussion is not structured, but rather, is determined by the needs and interests of the participants.
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • it is not clear that an outcomes driven system is what students require; many valuable skills and aptitudes – art appreciation, for example – are not identifiable as an outcome. This becomes evident when we consider how learning is to be measured. In traditional learning, success is achieved not merely by passing the test but in some way being recognized as having achieved expertise. A test-only system is a coarse system of measurement for a complex achievement.
  • The products of our conversations are as concrete as test scores and grades. (Ryan, 2007) But, as the result of a complex and interactive process, they are much more complex, allowing not only for the measurement of learning, but also for the recognition of learning. As it becomes easier to simply see what a student can accomplish, the idea of a coarse-grained proxy, such as grades, will fade to the background.
  • Most educators, and most educational institutions, have not yet embraced the idea of flow and syndication in learning. They will – reluctantly – because it provides the learner with the means to manage and control his or her learning. They can keep unwanted content to a minimum (and this includes unwanted content from an institution). And they can manage many more sources – or content streams – using feed reader technology.

    RSS and related specifications will be one of the primary ways Personal Learning Environments connect with remote systems. To use a PLE will be essentially to immerse oneself in the flow of communications that constitutes a community of practice in some discipline or domain on the internet.
  • In the end, what will be evaluated is a complex portfolio of a student’s online activities. (Syverson & Slatin, 2006)
  • place independence means that real learning will occur in real environments, with the contributions of the students not being some artifice designed strictly for practice, but an actual contribution to the business or enterprise in question.
  • As it becomes more and more possible to teach oneself online, and even to demonstrate one’s achievement through productive membership in a community of practice, there will be greater demand for a formalized system of recognition, a way for people to demonstrate their competence in an area without having to go through a formal program of study in the area.
  • the major shift in instructional technology will be from systems centered on the educational institution to systems centered on the individual learner.
  • rather than the employment of a single system to accomplish all educational tasks, both instructors and learners will use a variety of different tools in combination with each other.
  • Automation allows us to more easily create and present content, to more easily form groups and collaborate, to more easily give tests and take surveys. This frees instructors to perform tasks that have been traditionally more difficult and time consuming – to relate to students on a personal basis, to offer coaching and moral support, to learn about and analyze a student’s inclinations and understandings.
  •  
    Thanks for all of your inspiration!
  •  
    "an epic, must-read article" according to Brian Lamb (A social layer for DSpace? 2008.11.19
    http://weblogs.elearning.ubc.ca/brian/archives/049355.php)
Benjamin Jörissen

rre : Message: [RRE]The Social Life of Information - 0 views

  • The importance of people as creators and carriers of knowledge is
    forcing organizations to realize that knowledge lies less in its
    databases than in its people.
  • Learning to be requires more than just information.
    It requires the ability to engage in the practice in question.

    Indeed, Bruner's distinction highlights another, made by the
    philosopher Gilbert Ryle. He distinguishes "know that" from "know
    how".
  • This claim of Polanyi's resembles Ryle's
    argument that "know that" doesn't produce "know how," and Bruner's
    that learning about doesn't, on its own, allow you to learn to be.
    Information, all these arguments suggest, is on its own not enough
    to produce actionable knowledge. Practice too is required.
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • Despite the tendency to shut ourselves away and sit in Rodinesque
    isolation when we have to learn, learning is a remarkably social
    process. Social groups provide the resources for their members to
    learn.
  • Learning and Identity Shape One Another
  • Bruner, with his idea of learning to be, and Lave and Wenger, in their
    discussion of communities of practice, both stress how learning needs
    to be understood in relation to the development of human identity.
  • In learning to be, in becoming a member of a community of practice,
    an individual is developing a social identity.
  • So, even when people are
    learning about, in Bruner's terms, the identity they are developing
    determines what they pay attention to and what they learn. What
    people learn about, then, is always refracted through who they are and
    what they are learning to be.
  • In either case, the result, as the anthropologist Gregory
    Bateson puts it neatly, is "a difference that makes a difference". 29

    The importance of disturbance or change makes it almost inevitable
    that we focus on these.
  • So to understand the whole interaction, it is as
    important to ask how the lake is formed as to ask how the pebble got
    there. It's this formation rather than information that we want to
    draw attention to, though the development is almost imperceptible and
    the forces invisible in comparison to the drama and immediacy of the
    pebble.

    It's not, to repeat once more, the information that creates that
    background. The background has to be in place for the information
    to register.
  • The forces that shape the background are, rather,
    the tectonic social forces, always at work, within which and against
    which individuals configure their identity. These create not only
    grounds for reception, but grounds for interpretation, judgment, and
    understanding.
    • Benjamin Jörissen
       
      kulturelle Muster, die qua Sozialisation erworben werden, und die in Bildungsprozessen verändert werden.
  • A Brief Note on the "Social"
  • It took Karl Marx to point out, however, that Crusoe is not
    a universal. On his island (and in Defoe's mind), he is deeply rooted
    in the society from which he came
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • We
    need not watch long before we can explain it: he is playing at being
    a waiter in a cafe . . . . [T]he waiter plays with his condition in
    order to realize it
  • So while people do indeed learn alone, even when they are not stranded
    on desert islands or in small cafes, they are nonetheless always
    enmeshed in society, which saturates our environment, however much
    we might wish to escape it at times.
  • For the same reason, however, members of these networks are to some
    degree divided or separated from people with different practices.
    It is not the different information they have that divides them.
  • Rather, it
    is their different attitudes or dispositions toward that information
    -- attitudes and dispositions shaped by practice and identity --
    that divide. Consequently, despite much in common, physicians are
    different from nurses, accountants from financial planners.
  • two types of work-related networks
  • First, there are the networks that
    link people to others whom they may never get to know but who work
    on similar practices. We call these "networks of practice"
  • Second,
    there are the more tight-knit groups formed, again through practice,
    by people working together on the same or similar tasks. These are
    what, following Lave and Wenger, we call "communities of practice".
  • Networks of Practice
  • The 25,000 reps working for Xerox make up, in theory, such a network.
Paul Beaufait

ESP for Busy College Students: Is the Blend of In-Class, Online & Mobile Learning the A... - 4 views

  • Neumeier (2005) more broadly defines a hybrid learning environment as “a combination of face-to-face (FtF) and computer assisted learning” used in a single course delivery context (p. 164).
  • hybrid language learning courses are “only going to foster successful language learning if they are carefully designed on the basis of an analysis of the participants’ needs and abilities” (p. 176).
  • Learning English for Special Purposes requires a high degree of interaction with peers, teachers, and content. Effective interaction with content was built into the instructional design, however increased levels of communication with peers and teachers are essential and these can be achieved only through the Internet.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • writing practice and communication were conducted mainly through the computer not the mobile devices
  • students were in agreement that the blend of in-class, online and mobile delivery was an optimal solution for internationally trained immigrants learning English in a post-secondary context. They found the combination of 1) speaking taught primarily face-to-face, 2) listening taught on the mobile devices and 3) writing taught mainly online to be an effective approach.
  • the in-class component seemed to maintain the integrity of the hybrid course overall as it fostered a sense of community amongst the learners. As noted by participants, it was the design of the materials and the way in which they were presented, not the technology used, that impacted the effectiveness of the course the most.
  • The traditional classroom meetings though, were found most beneficial in promoting face-to-face interaction, ad-hoc speaking, pronunciation practice and the development of other communication competencies supported by visual cues.
  • the findings indicate that students’ progress was enabled by effective instructional design integrating goals and content relevant to the specific group of learners, together with the appropriate methods and media which enabled and enhanced interaction within the content.
  •  
    Palalas, Agnieszka. (2010). ESP for busy college students: It the blend of in-class, online & mobile learning the answer? IALLT Journal, 41(1). Retrieved November 22, 2011, from http://www.iallt.org/iallt_journal/esp_for_busy_college_students_is_the_blend_of_in_class_online_mobile_learning_the_answ
Anthony Beal

Games For Learning Institute » Games - 0 views

  •  
    "Most people would agree that a good game could help students
    learn. But what, exactly, makes a game good?

    With their vast popularity and singular ability to engage young
    people, digital games have been hailed as a new paradigm for
    education in the 21st century. But researchers know surprisingly
    little about how successful games work. What are the key
    design elements that make certain games compelling, playable,
    and fun? How do game genres differ in their educational
    effectiveness for specific topics and for specific learners? How
    do kids learn when they play games? Does the setting (classroom
    vs. casual) matter? How can games be used to prepare
    future learning, introduce new material, or strengthen and
    expand existing knowledge? How are games designed to best
    facilitate the transfer of learning to the realities of students'
    everyday lives? And how can we use all of this knowledge to
    guide future game design?"
Paul Beaufait

5 Instructional Shifts to Promote Deep Learning - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - DigL... - 14 views

  • The seamless integration of technology into the Common Core-aligned curriculum supports learning through active participation and increases opportunities for all students to have access to the tools and information they need for success.
  •  
    Oxnevad suggests, "Students can develop transferrable knowledge and skills as they engage in learning experiences that require them to construct knowledge" (¶1). She argues for "seamless integration of technology" that will enable "students students to have access to the tools and information they need for success" (¶2), and proposes five instructional strategies for teachers to use to achieve those ends, namely:

    1. Preparing "complex questions that require students to use higher level thinking skills" (Help students uncover knowledge, ¶2);
    2. Facilitating learning from engaging and online resources, rather than delivering content (Eliminate the front of the classroom);
    3. Creating opportunities for real world collaboration (Encourage collaboration);
    4. Exploiting classroom and online opportunities for "frequent [and] informal assessment to gauge the effectiveness of your instruction and make adjustments to maximize the learning experience for each student" (Informally assess students [and instructional practices]); and
    5. Preparing and publishing screencast tutorials for students to peruse whenever necessary, "...[i]Instead of spending valuable instructional time teaching the same tech skills over and over again to individual students" (Provide students with built in tech support).

    This October 30, 2012, post ends with an illustration comprising focus questions and a ThingLink product of fifth grade students' work. A list of links to related posts follows.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Tips for Pursuing Lifelong Learning with an Informal Lens - 8 views

  •  
    The top 10 tips for pursuing lifelong learning focus on ways you can continue education through informal learning experiences, as opposed to attending formal class settings. Why this approach? Enrolling in formal continuing education courses and classes is difficult at times, considering life's tugs and pulls by everyday commitments. These obligations are why informal learning methods offer a viable option for continuing your education.

Joao Alves

Mentoring and 21st Century Skills » Evolve - 0 views

  • key for lifelong learning and ongoing further development, not only to learn about ICT skills, but actually to learn with and from others in an continuum process of peer mentoring and support.
    • Joao Alves
       
      I can only agree with this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • Another key thought of this session was the idea that the skills 21st Century learners need doesn’t rely so much on acquiring information, but actually making sense of that information. Anne states that “knowing a fact is no longer impressive; rather important is how we add some critical thinking to it.” In this sense how we manage the abundance of information available these days on the we web is crucial. And that implies new skills, like networking and collaborative work.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Learning Technologies should not play a predominant role in the 21st Century learning and mentoring approach as not to overshadow the pedagogical strategy. Technologies should therefore be used to support new learning opportunities and enable different learning contexts. Still the emphasis has to be on the individual and on learning.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Agree. Many of us, including me, often tend to put the emphasis on technology instead on the the individual and on learning.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 17 views

  •  
    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

    These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example:

    * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time.

    * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers.

    * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page.

    * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
Izzaty P.

Moodle.org: open-source community-based tools for learning - 0 views

  •  
    Moodle is a Course Management System (CMS), also known as a Learning Management System (LMS) or a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). It is a Free web application that educators can use to create effective online learning sites.

    Moodle.org is our community site where Moodle is made and discussed.
Cristina Felea

Learning 2.010 Conference: Where do we go from here? - 0 views

  •  

    In a world where content is continually changing, and you can learn almost anything for free, what's the point of going to a conference?

    This is the question we started with in designing your Learning 2.010 Conference experience. The content is free and easy. If you want to learn how to use F
Victorious Kidss Educares Pune

Best school in Pune - Victorious Kidss Educares - 0 views

  •  
    Victorious Kidss Educares is best IB world school in Pune. Our motto is 'Learning to Love to Learn'. We focuses on education for building character. Learning is not merely for earning. The curriculum is strategically designed to develop learning to enable children achieve excellence in all walks of life and to lay a firm foundation for a strong character, a caring, a loving and a charming personality. We have certified following programmes
    1. Pre primary programme
    2. Primary years programme
    3. Middle year programme
    4. Diploma programme
    Visit is @ http://www.victoriouskidsseducares.org
tutstu

Student Dashboard | TutStu - 0 views

  •  
    TutStu has built its proprietary LMS (Learning Management System) for Students. Students become a part of the LMS from the moment they Login on TutStu. On further usage, you will realize that the LMS is a powerful & smart work-horse.

    It's just the type of tool Students must use to manage their tutoring and learning experience. It is automates a lot of functionalities, for DIY (Do-it-Yourself) Learning. Using TutStu, Students can just concentrate on their Tutoring and Learning. Everything else is smartly managed by the System.

    It will be our constant endeavour to add more features, add further analytics, updates and upgrades the TutStu LMS.
Paul Beaufait

braz2010vance [licensed for non-commercial use only] / PLN - 4 views

  • Etienne Wenger (2007) asked Cristina Costa when she knew she was in a community of practice and she said, when she noticed her practice had changed. And this is the correct answer.  When your practice changes, you know you have truly learned. The next step as a teacher is to model what you did for your students so that some will follow in your footsteps.


    So how can you do it?  Your change in practice probably won't be from this one encounter, unless I can convince you or nudge you, if you were heading that way already, into taking the next step in your journey.  The goal is to move from being just a consumer of networked content, which you in essence hoard, to a creator of content, which you share with the network that shares with you.

  • language teachers need to look beyond what it appears on the surface is happening between them and the learner and consider the bigger picture, such as ways in which technology fosters connections with communities and networks that humanize rather than isolate to strengthen individuals as an integral part of modern society and how that society acculturates, or learns together.
  • I encourage colleagues to think SMALL because in my view the computer is no longer the salient aspect of technology. The salient aspect is the use to which technology is put, and the salient use is to re-wire and expand how we are able to learn by enabling us to nurture and participate in always-on PLNs, or Personal Learning Networks.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • In order for teachers to grasp the fundamentals of applying technology to transformative learning outcomes, practice with peers is necessary, where teachers themselves become mentors for one another while sharing with one another their discoveries and experiences with their own learning.

  • Teachers who drive their own professional development through participation in PLNs constantly express and assess each other's needs, and promote professional development on an as-needed basis, from where it is only a short leap to applying it to students.
  •  
    PLN: The paradigm shift in teacher and learner autonomy
David Wetzel

What Does the Online Digital Footprint in Your Classroom Look Like? - 3 views

  •  
    In contrast to the digital footprint you use for your personal learning network, this focus is on the online digital footprint students' use in your science or math classroom. The power of a well designed digital footprint brings the capacity to transform a classroom into an online learning community. Within this community your students use digital tools to create and develop a personal learning network.
Izzaty P.

100 Essential Web 2.0 Tools for Teachers | Online Degree - 0 views

  •  
    There are new web 2.0 tools appearing every day. Although some of these tools were not originally meant for use in the classroom, they can be extremely effective learning tools for today's technology geared students and their venturesome teachers. Many of these teachers are searching for the latest products and technologies to help them find easier and efficient ways to create productive learning in their students. More and more teachers are using blogs, podcasts and wikis, as another approach to teaching. We have created a list of 100 tools we think will encourage interactivity and engagement, motivate and empower your students, and create differentiation in their learning process.
Holly Dilatush

How should we use the tagging system to b... | Diigo - 0 views

    • Joao Alves
       
      It's very to do if you use the Diigo toolbar. Just selelct the text you want to highlight and then click on the arrow beside the "Comment" button on the Diigo toolbar. There choose "Add a floating sticky note to this page." Then you'll get a pop-up window where you can choose to make your note private (only you can see it) or public or share it with a specific group. I am sharing this sticky note with the Learningwithcomputers group.
    • jennifer verschoor
       
      Thanks for sharing this!!! This is wonderful and we can continue discussing tags, categories or lists with the floating sticky notes.
      Jennifer
    • Carla Arena
       
      Isn't it nice, Jen, this feature? Can you envision pedagogical uses of it in the classroom?
    • Sasa Sirk
       
      These sticky notes are cool. :-) Thanks for sharing this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Yes, these floating sticky notes are really cool.
      Maybe we could encourage students to use them to make comments on texts they read on the Net. Who knows they would enjoy this way of reading and writing. Well, it's just a thought, maybe a too optimistic one.
    • Carla Arena
       
      We are all optimistic, aren't we, João? Maybe if we started not expecting that the students would write the sticky notes, but, at least, read ours, they could be encouraged to go further. For example, we could have them read a text and use the sticky notes for comprehension, reflection. What do you think?
    • Joao Alves
       
      Hi Carla, I like your idea of letting students read our sticky notes first. That would certainly be a good start. We wouldn't ask them to do anything in the beginning except looking at and reading our sticky notes. Maybe they (at least some of them) might also want to try using the sticky notes the same way. And we teachers mustn't show a too great enthusiasm for it, just behave the normal way or even show a kind of uninterested interest. :-) That's a lesson I learned. :-)
    • Carla Arena
       
      Exactly, Joao. That's the way I tend to do it, casually! I guess that if we just give the students a link with our annotation, like asking questions, then some of them would be. at least, curious to learn how we did that!
    • Joao Alves
       
      Exactly. Let's try that. It seems we are excellent educators. :-)
  • tag things with as many keywords as possible
  • tag things so they are easier for others to find
  • ...29 more annotations...
  • choose any or all of the recommended tags for your bookmarks.
  • you could simply use quotation marks for "lesson plan"
  • there are no better tags than others.
  • we should agree on a special tag for the group like "LWC" that we would always add to every bookmark we tagged.
  • Organizing tags in topics or bundles
  • CamelCase is my favorite for MultiWordTags
  • plural forms for countable nouns.
  • Take, for instance, collaborat, a tag I tend to favor in de.licio.us to capture the essence of collaborate, collaboration, collaborative, and collaborators
  • awareness-raising,
  • are means of raising awareness
  • wondering if there're any shortcut suggestions to 'attacking' the project of revisiting and tagging them?
  • I've been tagging many things both ESOL and ESL (because I don't know if diigo would automatically search for both. Is there a way to find out ?
  • we're moving from just collecting resources to a more engaged collective way of making the best out of the resources we share with the group.
  • the power of folksonomies is exactly having everybody tagging as much as possible, with as much key-words as you can think of. We won't ever be able to create a true "system"
  • agging for personal use x tagging for public good
  • Tagging will always be ambiguous because our very personal ways of classifying things and making them useful for us. Even so, with folksonomies, we're able to see the latest trends in a determined group or about a certain topic, we can go to places never imagined before.
  • e-learning
  • e-teaching, e-learning, networking, workshop, web
  • "prof. development"
  • difference between tags and categories
  • web2.0, wiki, professional_development, technology, edtech
  • e-learning
    e-learning
    e-teaching
    edtech
    networking
    prof. development
    professional_development
    technology
    web2.0
    web2.0
    wiki
    workshop
  • ProDev
  • web2.0, wikis, education, learning, teaching, ProDev, k-12

  • networking
  • I tend to use underscores and plurals, as well as one word tags, like professionaldevelopment, though I agree with Paul that ProfDev would make sense
  • I need to be more consistent.
  • The] "Lists" [function] provides another great way to organize bookmarks, a way that is complementary to tagging
    • Ilse Mönch
       
      Hi, yes I agree "Lists" are a great way to organize bookmarks. I already made a list for my "teaching resources" items as a try and now I'm going to experiment with the webslides. The only thing is that I imported my bookmarks from delicious and it's hard work to organize them all :-)
  •  
    So, how could we organize our tagging system after this week's discussion? Give some practical hints here.

    I'll start with:

    - try to keep a single word tag
    - add as many tags as you can think of
    - think of individual uses of the tags you're using, as well as the collective needs of easy retrieval of resources
    - tag, tag, tag
    - pay attention to mispelled words
    - use the groups' recommended tags in addition to the ones you've already used
    -
  •  
    Week 2 Discussion in the LearningwithComputers group about ways to improve our collective tagging experience.
David Wetzel

Integrating Technology into Project Based Learning - 20 views

  •  
    "Integration of technology is an integral part of project based learning, because technology is an integral part of life outside the classroom as revealed in this part of the definition - "types of learning and work people do in the everyday world outside the classroom.""
  •  
    David, there is a local school that has all of their students 7-12 with a laptop computer. They don't have any textbooks that are books, they are all ebooks now. This is definitely the directions technology is going in the schools.
Meister Lehnsherr

Free German Lessons on YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    You want to learn German? Then you're in the right place! Studying a new language can be difficult so I will make learning German as fun as possible for you. This channel offers a whole range of methods to learn German that'll immerse you in the German language and culture from wherever you are in the world! So take a break from your school books, dictionary and grammar studies and Get Germanized with me instead! "Learn German - Get Germanized" will help you to make learning German fun, fast and effective!
momo789

jordan 6 for sale allowing quick cuts and fast directional changes - 0 views

Jordan 6 for sale allowing quick cuts and fast directional changes no one has said that all children should be "best buddies" Jordan 6 Retro Sport Blue for sale and go all kumbayah or anything, but...

jordan 6 for sale

started by momo789 on 17 Sep 14 no follow-up yet
Paul Beaufait

FAQs-III: Groupwork in distance learning (Felder & Brent, 2001) - 3 views

  •  
    "Even in traditional classes students may do little or no work but get the same grade as their more industrious colleagues, and serious conflicts may arise between teammates with varying levels of ability and senses of responsibility. The problems may be even worse when groups are virtual and don't have the self-regulating capability provided by face-to-face meetings. It is therefore particularly important in distance classes to adhere to the defining principles of cooperative learning, especially positive interdependence (if anyone fails to do his or her part everyone loses in some way), individual accountability (all team members are held accountable for all the material in the assignment), and regular self-assessment of team functioning."
1 - 20 of 693 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page