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Carla Arena

Top 100 Tools for Learning: Analysis - 0 views

  • For workplace learning For formal education PowerPoint Audacity Articulate Moodle Snagit Captivate Slideshare Word Flash Camtasia YouTube flickr PowerPoint Wikispaces Slideshare Voicethread Audacity Moodle Ning Jing.
    • Holly Dilatush
       
      (bummer! I had typed a fairly long note on this, and then clicked to a different tab and lost it? apologies if this is a duplicate) Try again: Interesting list -- which do you use? PowerPoint, Audacity, Moodle and SlideShare made both lists. Does this spur your thinking/reflecting about attitudinal differences commonly recurring between workplace and higher ed/adult ed? In light of the likely funnelling of (USA) adult ed funding from K-12 and toward workforce (Workforce Investment Act), is there something to be learned here? More research would be interesting. Why would certain delivery solutions be preferred/selected by one group over another? thoughts? comments? reactions?
    • Carla Arena
       
      Holly, Very interesting questions for reflection. I don't know why one was chosen over the other in different spheres, but my guess is that in the workplace, it seems to have more of paid softwares like captivate, camtasia, etc, whereas in the formal educaton environment, some read/write web tools with free versions. Also, at the workplace the tools seem to be more of delivery of content, while in formal education, they're more related to social software with possibilities of social construction of knowledge. What do you think?
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    I think Carla might be on to something where she surmises workplace content delivery (or training), in contrast to education, as well as the attractiveness of free and open source tools to educators. The Top 100 Tools...: Analysis page cross-links to a CLPT programme on free tools (http://c4lpt.co.uk/25Tools/Tools/about.html), which in turn links to a Ning group, whose intro. pairs education with training instead of learning. Perhaps learning is too broad a term for the Top 100 Tools proposed for workplaces. It is also interesting to note that the top ten for neither workplaces nor formal educational settings include web browsers. It is hard to imagine using either Moodle or Slideshare without a browser, isn't it?
Hurray Software Academy

SAP GRC|SAP Training in Bangalore-HURRAY Software Academy - 0 views

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    ERP,SAP Technical:Get SAP GRC training which helps in improving risk analysis and avoiding risks, access management.For mroe details visit: http://hurray.ind.in/grc.html
Izzaty P.

Use Diigo To Help Write Your Next College Essay or Term Paper - 0 views

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    Since the Internet is a tool that most students use to do research, and since most research papers are based on quotes used from various sources, Diigo provides a way to not only bookmark your sources, but also to manage and access your quotes, notes, and analysis.
David Wetzel

Stimulating Critical Thinking through a Technological Lens - 13 views

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    Stimulating critical thinking using technology has the potential to create more in depth understanding of science and math content by students when engaged in learning activities which integrate in-class and on-line technology resources. Technology tools support stimulation of both inquiry-based and critical thinking skills by engaging students in exploring, thinking, reading, writing, researching, inventing, problem-solving, and experiencing the world outside their classroom. This is accomplished through learning content through the lens of video to multimedia to the internet (Using Technology to Improve Student Achievement, NCREL, 2005).
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
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    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
Paul Beaufait

ESP for Busy College Students: Is the Blend of In-Class, Online & Mobile Learning the Answer? | IALLT - 4 views

  • Neumeier (2005) more broadly defines a hybrid learning environment as “a combination of face-to-face (FtF) and computer assisted learning” used in a single course delivery context (p. 164).
  • hybrid language learning courses are “only going to foster successful language learning if they are carefully designed on the basis of an analysis of the participants’ needs and abilities” (p. 176).
  • Learning English for Special Purposes requires a high degree of interaction with peers, teachers, and content. Effective interaction with content was built into the instructional design, however increased levels of communication with peers and teachers are essential and these can be achieved only through the Internet.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • writing practice and communication were conducted mainly through the computer not the mobile devices
  • students were in agreement that the blend of in-class, online and mobile delivery was an optimal solution for internationally trained immigrants learning English in a post-secondary context. They found the combination of 1) speaking taught primarily face-to-face, 2) listening taught on the mobile devices and 3) writing taught mainly online to be an effective approach.
  • the in-class component seemed to maintain the integrity of the hybrid course overall as it fostered a sense of community amongst the learners. As noted by participants, it was the design of the materials and the way in which they were presented, not the technology used, that impacted the effectiveness of the course the most.
  • The traditional classroom meetings though, were found most beneficial in promoting face-to-face interaction, ad-hoc speaking, pronunciation practice and the development of other communication competencies supported by visual cues.
  • the findings indicate that students’ progress was enabled by effective instructional design integrating goals and content relevant to the specific group of learners, together with the appropriate methods and media which enabled and enhanced interaction within the content.
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    Palalas, Agnieszka. (2010). ESP for busy college students: It the blend of in-class, online & mobile learning the answer? IALLT Journal, 41(1). Retrieved November 22, 2011, from http://www.iallt.org/iallt_journal/esp_for_busy_college_students_is_the_blend_of_in_class_online_mobile_learning_the_answ
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