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BBC News - NatWest online services hit by cyber attack - 0 views

  • ails safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6");
  • Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); hyper-depth-st
  • 's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); Your Savings
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  • and cash machines. Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&amp;A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&amp;A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&amp;A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); <h4 cla
  • It came less than a week after a major computer failure left some customers unable to use cards and cash machines.
  • On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website
  • Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today,
dr tech

Major cyber-attack will happen soon, warns UK's security boss | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "A "category one" cyber-attack, the most serious tier possible, will happen "sometime in the next few years", a director of the National Cybersecurity Centre has warned. According to the agency, which reports to GCHQ and has responsibly for ensuring the UK's information security, a category one cybersecurity incident requires a national government response. "
dr tech

teachwithyouripad - Usng Audience Response with the iPAD - 0 views

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    Great wiki lots of resources and tools for the iPAD...
dr tech

Teaching In The Age Of AI Means Getting Creative | FiveThirtyEight - 0 views

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    ""ChatGPT may have better syntax than humans, but it's shallow on research and critical thinking," said Lauren Goodlad, a professor of English and comparative literature at Rutgers University and the chair of its Critical Artificial Intelligence initiative. She said she understands where concern about the tool is coming from but that - at least at the college level - the type and caliber of written tasks that ChatGPT can offer does not replace critical thinking and human creativity. "These are statistical models," she said. "And so they favor probability, as in they are trained on data, and the only reason they work as well as they do is that they are looking for probable responses to a prompt.""
dr tech

When Intelligent Machines Cause Accidents, Who Is Legally Responsible? - 0 views

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    "Currently, the law treats machines as if they were all created equal, as simple consumer products. In most cases, when an accident occurs, standards of strict product liability law apply. In other words, unless a consumer uses a product in an outrageous way or grossly ignores safety warnings, the manufacturer is automatically considered at fault."
dr tech

Death technology will allow grieving people to bring back their loved ones from the dea... - 0 views

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    "The possibility of digitally interacting with someone from beyond the grave is no longer the stuff of science fiction. The technology to create convincing digital surrogates of the dead is here, and it's rapidly evolving, with researchers predicting its mainstream viability within a decade. But what about the ethics of bereavement-and the privacy of the deceased? Speaking with a loved one evokes a powerful emotional response. The ability to do so in the wake of their death will inevitably affect the human process of grieving in ways we're only beginning to explore."
dr tech

How the internet was invented | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "In response, the architects of the internet developed a kind of digital Esperanto: a common language that enabled data to travel across any network. In 1974, two Arpa researchers named Robert Kahn and Vint Cerf published an early blueprint. Drawing on conversations happening throughout the international networking community, they sketched a design for "a simple but very flexible protocol": a universal set of rules for how computers should communicate."
dr tech

Google's 'Pay Per Gaze' and the Future of Connected Advertising - 0 views

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    "While Google has played down the notion of rolling out anything soon (it will take years until Glass builds up enough users to make it worthwhile), marketers can't stop buzzing about the possibility of paying for ads in the physical world based on user engagement and reactions. The patent even details how a device like Google Glass could infer a user's emotional response to an ad - whether they were happy, sad or indifferent - and adjust pricing accordingly."
dr tech

Letters: Protecting our children from porn | Culture | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "There is no quick technical fix that will protect children - it needs education, responsible parenting and more resources for enforcing the laws that already exist. Dr Martyn Thomas Institution of Engineering and Technology"
dr tech

Is technology bad for us? | Eva Wiseman | Life and style | The Observer - 0 views

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    "So instead of switching off the internet, the conversation should be about how to change it. How to clarify what we're giving for what we take. And the responsibility should not be with young people, in their WiFi-reliant worlds - it should be with the massive corporations that profit from them. As with cigarette packets (their photos of messy lungs a stark reminder of the choice you're making), so should the internet be required to advertise its risks, to alert you to where your data is being held. Because this is not just somewhere we play. The internet is where we live."
dr tech

Google: 100,000 lives a year lost through fear of data-mining | Technology | theguardia... - 0 views

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    "Fear of data-mining of healthcare could be costing as many as 100,000 lives a year, according to Google's Larry Page. Speaking out in response to fears over his company's vast haul of personal information, Page made the case that not only is Google not going too far with collecting and analysing such information - it's not going far enough."
dr tech

Were Luis Suárez's bite marks Photoshopped? | Football | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    "The response on Twitter was predictably splenetic. Suárez's supporters claimed the images were manipulated, their argument promoted by a rather well-done diptych which did the rounds. The left-hand image - which had been photoshopped to remove the marks - purported to be the "real" unaltered version, while the right hand side - Gentile's original image - was labelled the fake."
dr tech

Public bodies are releasing confidential personal data by accident, activists say | Tec... - 0 views

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    "Freedom of information website WhatDoTheyKnow.com, which automates FOI requests and publishes responses, says it has recorded 154 accidental data leaks made by councils, government departments, police, the NHS and other public bodies since 2009. This amounts to confidential data being wrongly released on average once every fortnight."
Mcdoogleh CDKEY

BBC News - Newsnight - iPhone faults to hurt Apple's core? - 0 views

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    Apple is offering a free case to tackle the iPhone 4's antenna problem, but will the fault damage the technology giant's reputation?Apple called a press conference at which the case offer was made in response to ongoing speculation about the phone's problems, and boss Steve Jobs also offered a full refund for the handset.
dr tech

Turkey orders block of Twitter's IP addresses - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Just a few days after Turkey's scandal-rocked government banned Twitter by tweaking national DNS settings, the state has doubled down by ordering ISPs to block Twitter's IP addresses, in response to the widespread dissemination of alternative DNS servers, especially Google's 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 (these numbers were even graffitied on walls). "
dr tech

8 Skilled Jobs That May Soon Be Replaced by Robots - 0 views

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    "Unskilled manual laborers have felt the pressure of automation for a long time - but, increasingly, they're not alone. The last few years have been a bonanza of advances in artificial intelligence. As our software gets smarter, it can tackle harder problems, which means white-collar and pink-collar workers are at risk as well. Here are eight jobs expected to be automated (partially or entirely) in the coming decades. Call Center Employees call-center Telemarketing used to happen in a crowded call center, with a group of representatives cold-calling hundreds of prospects every day. Of those, maybe a few dozen could be persuaded to buy the product in question. Today, the idea is largely the same, but the methods are far more efficient. Many of today's telemarketers are not human. In some cases, as you've probably experienced, there's nothing but a recording on the other end of the line. It may prompt you to "press '1' for more information," but nothing you say has any impact on the call - and, usually, that's clear to you. But in other cases, you may get a sales call and have no idea that you're actually speaking to a computer. Everything you say gets an appropriate response - the voice may even laugh. How is that possible? Well, in some cases, there is a human being on the other side, and they're just pressing buttons on a keyboard to walk you through a pre-recorded but highly interactive marketing pitch. It's a more practical version of those funny soundboards that used to be all the rage for prank calls. Using soundboard-assisted calling - regardless of what it says about the state of human interaction - has the potential to make individual call center employees far more productive: in some cases, a single worker will run two or even three calls at the same time. In the not too distant future, computers will be able to man the phones by themselves. At the intersection of big data, artificial intelligence, and advanced
dr tech

Should Britain introduce electronic voting? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    ""In the 2020 general election, secure online voting should be an option for all voters," said the report. In response, the Electoral Commission's chair, Jenny Watson, said: "We will consider carefully the balance between maintaining the security of the system, whilst making it as accessible as possible for voters as part of this.""
dr tech

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Should we embrace these new trust algorithms? Baveja and Shapiro acknowledge the responsibility that comes with trying to take ethical decisions and translate them into code. How much of our personal information do we want trawled through in this way? And how comfortable are we with letting an algorithm judge who is trustworthy?"
dr tech

Data Mining Has Revealed Previously Unknown Russian Twitter Troll Campaigns - 0 views

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    "That's interesting work suggesting that Russian troll activity was significantly more ambitious on an international scale than previously thought. It also suggests a way of spotting this kind of meddling as it is happening by looking for the kind of forensic fingerprint the team identified. Of course, finding trolls is a cat-and-mouse game. For the organizations responsible for Russian troll activity, it ought to be a straightforward matter to change the pattern of activity in a way that does not create the same signature."
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