Skip to main content

Home/ educators/ Group items tagged knowledge

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Martin Burrett

Improving Knowledge Retrieval by @guruteaching - 2 views

  •  
    "Watching my students' faces as I explain to them that they will be sitting a test in a fortnight is something to behold.  I often witness a whole range of emotions, from annoyance, to despair, to completely blank and unreadable expressions. It's never a good look! So, a priority I've been working on for the past few months is improving knowledge retrieval, so that when a test is announced, my students can deal with it in a much more positive way."
Martin Burrett

Stack Exchange - 3 views

  •  
    As you know, teachers know everything. But there are some mere mortals out there who still need to ask questions. This is a fabulous site with over 80 specialist areas to ask questions to the cloud. The community will then help you find an answer. The areas include English and other languages, computing, maths, science, history and much more. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
John Marr

Recovering from the Need to Achieve - HBS Working Knowledge - 2 views

  • e is an HNAP, or a high-need-for-achievement professional, according to Harvard Business
  • DeLong believes the tendency to be a high-need-for-achievement type is embedded in the DNA, an addiction that spans across socioeconomic groups. Instead of experiencing happiness or well-being, HNAPs seek "relief in the accomplishment of tasks." Moving immediately to the next task on the list, they never savor accomplishments for long, he says. This creates a vicious cycle marked by a feeling of little or no real sense of purpose and a "flatness"—in career and in life. They often go through patches of life without creating or enhancing meaningful relationships, and even lack strength to deal with life's failures.
  • So is there relief for HNAPs from all this obsessive comparing and competing?
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Copyright © 2011 President and Fellows of Harvard College
  • I realize that most hard-driving managers and executives have been socialized to believe they cannot admit vulnerability to themselves or others. I would urge you to get past this misconception and realize that such admissions will enhance your productivity and career. So, consider: Do you regret any significant decisions you've made about your career? If you had to do it over again, would you do it differently? Have there been times when you treated your people unfairly? When you failed to listen and learn and instead directed and dictated? Do you feel you've been working at peak capacity in recent years? If not, why not? Are you unwilling to admit your mistakes to your direct reports? To your bosses? To your colleagues? Have you asked anyone for help recently? Have you admitted you didn't know something and needed to learn it? Have you asked for coaching? If you were to be completely honest with your boss and knew that there would be no negative repercussions, what secret fear or anxiety would you admit to him? Do you believe that you're in the right job, in the right group, and in the right organization? Or do you feel there's a mismatch between where you are now and what you want to accomplish
  • Letting go—or flying without a net—is a big part of DeLong's prescription. He calls for the reader to stop and reflect with self-awareness; let go of the past; create a vision or specific goal with an agenda; seek support through mentors and a network; don't blink (or fall back on old behaviors); and take action that makes you vulnerable.
    • John Marr
       
      Do you know any students that are high-need-for-achievement?
  •  
    Harvard Business School Blog about high need for achievement professionals. Can this be applied to some of our students?
Tero Toivanen

Times Higher Education - From where I sit - Everyone wins in this free-for-all - 5 views

  •  
    The term open educational resources (OER) encapsulates the simple but powerful idea that the world's knowledge is a public good. The internet offers unprecedented opportunities to share, use and reuse knowledge. Sadly, most of the planet is underserved when it comes to post-secondary education.
Ruth Howard

ZaidLearn: The MOOC Survival Kit in Plain English! - 13 views

  •  
    If you're up for it pure fun! w Downes and Siemens. Zaidkleran has a few tips before you jump, but i say beginners mind best in no right or wrongs just get wet...
David Hilton

Let teachers get on with teaching | spiked - 35 views

  •  
    A thought-provoking article on the reasons for the decay in education. Couldn't agree more.
David Hilton

The MET Research Paper: Achievement of What? « The Core Knowledge Blog - 8 views

  •  
    A research paper commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that finds that students know when they are being taught well and when they are not. 
David Wetzel

5 Ways to Integrate Science Process Skills in Lessons - 16 views

  •  
    Integrating the science process skills within your teaching does not require drastic changes. It simply involves making the process of science more explicit in lessons, investigations, and activities you are already using in your curriculum. The science process skills are the methods used for helping our students understand how we know what we know about the world in which they live. This often means going beyond a science textbook and supplementing the core-content within textbooks. It also means using your course content as a means for exposing students to the real process of science.
David Wetzel

7 Tips for Developing Online Learning Skills: Distance Learning Requires Different Abil... - 17 views

  •  
    "Developing online learning skills is essential for adult learners to support their completion of education goals. Although these students can easily locate an online course or degree program that's both convenient and accessible, they may face significant challenges in developing the skills necessary for success in an online learning environment."
David Wetzel

Writing as a Process of Inquiry - 27 views

  •  
    Being the curious type, with the inane ability to know how to look up information and conduct research, I soon found a quote by Johannes Kepler (1571 - 1630) who was a German astronomer who stated - Why are things as they are and not otherwise? My mentor extraordinaire!
David Hilton

Common Core - Working to Bring Exciting, Comprehensive, Content-Rich Instruction to Eve... - 2 views

  •  
    We believe that a child who graduates from high school without an understanding of culture, the arts, history, literature, civics, and language has in fact been left behind. So to improve education in America, we're promoting programs, policies, and initiatives at the local, state, and federal levels that provide students with challenging, rigorous instruction in the full range of liberal arts and sciences.
  •  
    Very heartening to see a growing movement advocating a knowledge-rich, intellectually rigorous curriculum for schools. They've got the funds to hire good photographers and models with nice skin, too.
David Hilton

Literacy Creep at The Core Knowledge Blog - 13 views

  •  
    An article in last week's Education Week looks at the increasingly common practice of reading aloud to middle and high school students. In discussing the practice with Mary Ann Zehr (I'm quoted briefly in the piece) I made the point that while there is certainly nothing wrong with reading out loud to teenagers, it is symptomatic of what I call "literacy creep" - the tendency of elementary school-style instructional techniques to find their way deeper into K-12 education across all content areas.
  •  
    Yet another beautiful analysis of a major problem in education today by the good people at Core Knowledge.
Vicki Davis

Knol - a unit of knowledge: share what you know, publish your expertise. - 9 views

  •  
    Share what you know and write a knol. Did you know? You can embed forms in your knols. Great for conducting surveys or managing collaborative knols!
  •  
    A website where people share knowledge. This was listed as an important website for learning. I haven't explored it yet, but hope that some of you will share what you're doing in the comments.
Ruth Howard

Half an Hour: An Operating System for the Mind - 0 views

  • The reason I pose these questions in particular is that, while it is necessary (and possible) to teach facts to people, it comes with a price. And the price is this: facts learned in this way, and especially by rote, and especially at a younger age, take a direct route into the mind, and bypass a person's critical and reflective capacities, and indeed, become a part of those capacities in the future.When you teach children facts as facts, and when you do it through a process of study and drill, it doesn't occur to children to question whether or not those facts are true, or appropriate, or moral, or legal, or anything else. Rote learning is a short circuit into the brain. It's direct programming. People who study, and learn, that 2+2=4, know that 2+2=4, not because they understand the theory of mathematics, not because they have read Hilbert and understand formalism, or can refute Brouwer and reject intuitionism, but because they know (full stop) 2+2=4.
  • First
  • . There are more facts in the world than anyone could know
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • Second
  • facts change
  • We need to be able to determine what is salient or important to ourselves and to others.
  • Third
  • Fourth
  • you need some mechansism to detect and reject false representations of facts
  • comparing and assessing facts
  • Fifth
  • basis for action
  • we can create facts in the world
  • Sixth
  • we need the capacity to act
  • And what we discover when we think about it this way is that it's not simple whether or not we need facts that is important, but also, what format the facts are in that is equally important, if not more important.
  • You need, in other words, need to acquire facts in a format appropriate to your knowledge system.
  • 21st century skills are, in short, an operating system for the mind.
  • They constitute the processes and capacities that make it possible for people to navigate a fact-filled landscape, a way to see, understand and acquire those facts in such a way as to be relevant and useful, and in the end, to be self-contained and autonomous agents capable of making their own decisions and directing their own lives, rather than people who need to learn ever larger piles of 'facts' in order to do even the most basic tasks.
  • What we have learned - what we are understanding, uniquely, in the 21st century - is that the nature of facts is very different from anything we thought before:
  • empowerment,
  • Today - surely we've seen enough evidence of this! - if you simply follow the rules, do what you're told, do your job and stay out of trouble, you will be led to ruin.
  • an abundance of facts will not help you, it will instead sweep you over the waterfall.
  •  
    And the price is this: facts learned in this way, and especially by rote, and especially at a younger age, take a direct route into the mind, and bypass a person's critical and reflective capacities, and indeed, become a part of those capacities in the future.
  •  
    while it is necessary (and possible) to teach facts to people, it comes with a price. And the price is this: facts learned in this way, and especially by rote, and especially at a younger age, take a direct root into the mind, and bypass a person's critical and reflective capacities, and indeed, become a part of those capacities in the future.\n\nWhen you teach children facts as facts, and when you do it through a process of study and drill, it doesn't occur to children to question whether or not those facts are true, or appropriate, or moral, or legal, or anything else. Rote learning is a short circuit into the brain. It's direct programming. People who study, and learn, that 2+2=4, know that 2+2=4, not because they understand the theory of mathematics, not because they have read Hilbert and understand formalism, or can refute Brouwer and reject intuitionism, but because they know (full stop) 2+2=4.\n\nI used the phrase "it's direct programming" deliberately. This is an analogy we can wrap our minds around. We can think of direct instruction as being similar to direct programming. It is, effectively, a mechanism of putting content into a learner's mind as effectively and efficiently as possible, so that when the time comes later (as it will) that the learner needs to use that fact, it is instantly and easily accessible.
Ted Sakshaug

The Why Files | The Science Behind the News - 0 views

  •  
    The science behind the news
Ted Sakshaug

Wolfram|Alpha - 0 views

  •  
    Let's say we succeed in creating a system that knows a lot, and can figure a lot out. How can we interact with it? It's going to be a website: www.wolframalpha.com. With one simple input field that gives access to a huge system, with trillions of pieces of curated data and millions of lines of algorithms.
  •  
    Making the world's knowledge computableToday's Wolfram|Alpha is the first step in an ambitious, long-term project to make all systematic knowledge immediately computable by anyone.  You enter your question or calculation, and Wolfram|Alpha uses its built-in algorithms and growing collection of data to compute the answer
Maggie Verster

From Knowledgeable to Knowledge-able: Experiments in New Media Literacy - 0 views

  •  
    It took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after speech, thousands more before the printing press was invented, and a few hundred more for the telegraph to arrive. Today, new ways of relating are constantly created and a new communication medium emerges every time someone creates a web application-a Flickr here, a Twitter there. How can we use new media to foster the kinds of communication and community we desire in education? This presentation will discuss both successful and unsuccessful attempts to integrate emerging technologies into the classroom to create a rich virtual learning environment.
1 - 20 of 25 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page