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Gwen Noda

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/stories/2013/08/8_27_13climate_change_us_ecosystems.html - 1 views

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    "New Report Summarizes Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Oceans, Marine Resources"
Gwen Noda

Reality Drop: Spread Science about Climate Change, Global Warming - 0 views

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    posted to facebook: "97% of #climate scientists agree on #climate change. Have you used @RealityDrop to destroy denial? http://ow.ly/lz6DF"
Gwen Noda

Winds of Change - 0 views

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    Winds of Change
    Jane Qiu
    Antarctica does not respond to global warming uniformly like a giant ice cube. Changing wind patterns are an unsung force shaping Antarctica's future. Retreating sea ice and stronger winds have caused seawater to mix more deeply, a process that churns sunlight-dependent phytoplankton into the ocean's depths. As a result, phytoplankton biomass has declined by 12% over the past 30 years. Higher on the food chain, that means fewer krill and fish larvae. These creatures are also getting hammered by the loss of sea ice, which hides them from predators. The complex interplay between air, sea, and ice has emerged as a central theme underlying climate change in Antarctica. Shifting wind patterns and corresponding ocean changes can explain climate responses across the continent.
Gwen Noda

Science Magazine: Sign In - 0 views

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    Warming and Melting

    Mass loss from the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica account for a large fraction of global sea-level rise. Part of this loss is because of the effects of warmer air temperatures, and another because of the rising ocean temperatures to which they are being exposed. Joughin et al. (p. 1172) review how ocean-ice interactions are impacting ice sheets and discuss the possible ways that exposure of floating ice shelves and grounded ice margins are subject to the influences of warming ocean currents. Estimates of the mass balance of the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica have differed greatly-in some cases, not even agreeing about whether there is a net loss or a net gain-making it more difficult to project accurately future sea-level change. Shepherd et al. (p. 1183) combined data sets produced by satellite altimetry, interferometry, and gravimetry to construct a more robust ice-sheet mass balance for the period between 1992 and 2011. All major regions of the two ice sheets appear to be losing mass, except for East Antarctica. All told, mass loss from the polar ice sheets is contributing about 0.6 millimeters per year (roughly 20% of the total) to the current rate of global sea-level rise.
Gwen Noda

Around the World - 0 views

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    "Australian officials announced that part of a planned marine park will be set aside to help protect humpback whales; Mexico's legislature passed a strong, new climate change law"
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