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Nigel Coutts

The power of powerful ideas shared simply - The Learner's Way - 5 views

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    Some statements stand out in your memory for the power with which they resonate through you mind. I recall the first time I encountered the question posed by Alan November "Who owns the learning?" on the cover of his book of the same name. In four words, Alan poses a question that strikes at the heart of education and encourages us to re-think our approach. If we believe that the learner should own the learning, what are the implications of this for our teaching? Like a stone dropped on the surface of a calm pond, the ripples from a powerful idea spread, expand and gain strength. 
xiaobaicai

Electric power fittings-Paerpu Import and Export Trading - 0 views

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    We are professional Electric power fittings supplier.we can suuply Electric power fittings to you.welcome to contact us.
firozrrp

Ulephone Power launched with 6050mAh battery, fingerprint scanner,Infrared sensor - Gadgets World - 0 views

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    Ulephone Power with 6050mAh battery, 5.5-inch fHD display, 3GB RAM, octa core processor priced at US$300 (Approx Rs.13950), whic is really a good deal in this specifications. Ulephone Power smartphone launched with massive 6050mAh battery, it also comes with 9V/~3A quick charger that can charge the device fully in just 90 to 120 minutes, the company… Read More »
Carlos Quintero

Supercool School - Education without limits - 0 views

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    Infinite Power Learning For You Join our request based learning marketplace on Facebook and learn whatever you want in the most Powerful social network world-wide. Join our request based learning marketplace on Facebook and learn whatever you want in the most Powerful social network world-wide. Click the button below and let the fun begin! Click the button below and let the fun begin!
J Black

Transitioning to Web 2.0: More thoughts on Twitter, Personality Types and Efficiency - 0 views

  • But, I don't think Image via WikipediaI missed the point of Twitter at all. It's quite the opposite. I'm constantly trying new Web 2.0 tools. Many do what they are supposed to do -- just like ordinary tools in your toolbox. But time and efficiency matter. Where I'm at right now in my professional life, I need a power washer not a putty knife/paint scraper. Both do what they are intended to do, but one gets results much more efficiently. Blog commenting, Nings, webinar participation, and back channel commenting are, to me, PLN power washers.
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    But, I don't think I missed the point of Twitter at all. It's quite the opposite. I'm constantly trying new Web 2.0 tools. Many do what they are supposed to do -- just like ordinary tools in your toolbox. But time and efficiency matter. Where I'm at right now in my professional life, I need a power washer not a putty knife/paint scraper. Both do what they are intended to do, but one gets results much more efficiently. Blog commenting, Nings, webinar participation, and back channel commenting are, to me, PLN power washers.
Nigel Coutts

Understanding the power of stories - The Learner's Way - 14 views

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    We are the stories that we tell and it is the stories we share which unite us. This was the seed of an idea planted by a day with author, artist, musician and story teller Boori Pryor. Understanding the power that our stories have allows us to better value their role in our lives, to see them as more than recounts of the past or imaginings of the future. Stories should be viewed as the powerful agents that they are with the force to shape who we are as much as we shape them.
Tero Toivanen

Digital Citizenship | the human network - 0 views

  • The change is already well underway, but this change is not being led by teachers, administrators, parents or politicians. Coming from the ground up, the true agents of change are the students within the educational system.
  • While some may be content to sit on the sidelines and wait until this cultural reorganization plays itself out, as educators you have no such luxury. Everything hits you first, and with full force. You are embedded within this change, as much so as this generation of students.
  • We make much of the difference between “digital immigrants”, such as ourselves, and “digital natives”, such as these children. These kids are entirely comfortable within the digital world, having never known anything else. We casually assume that this difference is merely a quantitative facility. In fact, the difference is almost entirely qualitative. The schema upon which their world-views are based, the literal ‘rules of their world’, are completely different.
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  • The Earth becomes a chalkboard, a spreadsheet, a presentation medium, where the thorny problems of global civilization and its discontents can be explored out in exquisite detail. In this sense, no problem, no matter how vast, no matter how global, will be seen as being beyond the reach of these children. They’ll learn this – not because of what teacher says, or what homework assignments they complete – through interaction with the technology itself.
  • We and our technological-materialist culture have fostered an environment of such tremendous novelty and variety that we have changed the equations of childhood.
  • As it turns out (and there are numerous examples to support this) a mobile handset is probably the most important tool someone can employ to improve their economic well-being. A farmer can call ahead to markets to find out which is paying the best price for his crop; the same goes for fishermen. Tradesmen can close deals without the hassle and lost time involved in travel; craftswomen can coordinate their creative resources with a few text messages. Each of these examples can be found in any Bangladeshi city or Africa village.
  • The sharing of information is an innate human behavior: since we learned to speak we’ve been talking to each other, warning each other of dangers, informing each other of opportunities, positing possibilities, and just generally reassuring each other with the sound of our voices. We’ve now extended that four-billion-fold, so that half of humanity is directly connected, one to another.
  • Everything we do, both within and outside the classroom, must be seen through this prism of sharing. Teenagers log onto video chat services such as Skype, and do their homework together, at a distance, sharing and comparing their results. Parents offer up their kindergartener’s presentations to other parents through Twitter – and those parents respond to the offer. All of this both amplifies and undermines the classroom. The classroom has not dealt with the phenomenal transformation in the connectivity of the broader culture, and is in danger of becoming obsolesced by it.
  • We already live in a time of disconnect, where the classroom has stopped reflecting the world outside its walls. The classroom is born of an industrial mode of thinking, where hierarchy and reproducibility were the order of the day. The world outside those walls is networked and highly heterogeneous. And where the classroom touches the world outside, sparks fly; the classroom can’t handle the currents generated by the culture of connectivity and sharing. This can not go on.
  • We must accept the reality of the 21st century, that, more than anything else, this is the networked era, and that this network has gifted us with new capabilities even as it presents us with new dangers. Both gifts and dangers are issues of potency; the network has made us incredibly powerful. The network is smarter, faster and more agile than the hierarchy; when the two collide – as they’re bound to, with increasing frequency – the network always wins.
  • A text message can unleash revolution, or land a teenager in jail on charges of peddling child pornography, or spark a riot on a Sydney beach; Wikipedia can drive Britannica, a quarter millennium-old reference text out of business; a outsider candidate can get himself elected president of the United States because his team masters the logic of the network. In truth, we already live in the age of digital citizenship, but so many of us don’t know the rules, and hence, are poor citizens.
  • before a child is given a computer – either at home or in school – it must be accompanied by instruction in the power of the network. A child may have a natural facility with the network without having any sense of the power of the network as an amplifier of capability. It’s that disconnect which digital citizenship must bridge.
  • Let us instead focus on how we will use technology in fifty years’ time. We can already see the shape of the future in one outstanding example – a website known as RateMyProfessors.com. Here, in a database of nine million reviews of one million teachers, lecturers and professors, students can learn which instructors bore, which grade easily, which excite the mind, and so forth. This simple site – which grew out of the power of sharing – has radically changed the balance of power on university campuses throughout the US and the UK.
  • Alongside the rise of RateMyProfessors.com, there has been an exponential increase in the amount of lecture material you can find online, whether on YouTube, or iTunes University, or any number of dedicated websites. Those lectures also have ratings, so it is already possible for a student to get to the best and most popular lectures on any subject, be it calculus or Mandarin or the medieval history of Europe.
  • As the university dissolves in the universal solvent of the network, the capacity to use the network for education increases geometrically; education will be available everywhere the network reaches. It already reaches half of humanity; in a few years it will cover three-quarters of the population of the planet. Certainly by 2060 network access will be thought of as a human right, much like food and clean water.
  • Educators will continue to collaborate, but without much of the physical infrastructure we currently associate with educational institutions. Classrooms will self-organize and disperse organically, driven by need, proximity, or interest, and the best instructors will find themselves constantly in demand. Life-long learning will no longer be a catch-phrase, but a reality for the billions of individuals all focusing on improving their effectiveness within an ever-more-competitive global market for talent.
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    Mark Pesce: Digital Citizenship and the future of Education.
anonymous

Art Project, powered by Google - 25 views

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    The Art Project powered by Google features interior tours of seventeen world famous art museums. Select a museum from the list on the homepage & you can virtually tour it using the same interface style you experience in Google Maps Streetview. Inside the museum, just double click to zoom to a location. You can also open a floor plan overview & click on a room to navigate to that part of the museum. The best part of the Art Project powered by Google is the option to create your own artwork collection while visiting each museum. As you're touring a museum click on the "+" symbol on any work of art see it in greater detail, to add it to your collection, & to open background information about that work of art. To create a collection you must be signed into a Google account. This is a great way to start a story or writing prompt, or to explore history & cultures.
Philippe Scheimann

10 Simple Postures That Boost Performance - PsyBlog - 43 views

  • Psychological research suggests simple actions can project power, persuade others, increase empathy, boost cognitive performance and more...
  • Pose for power
  • Powerful poses take up more space, so spread your body and open up the arms or legs. When you dominate the space, your mind gets the message.
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  • Tense up for willpower
  • Cross arms for persistence
  • Lie down for insight
  • Smile for happiness
  • best naps were 10 minutes long
  • Gesture for persuasion
  • And gesture for understanding
  • hildren who were encouraged to gesture while learning, retained more of what they learnt.
  • Nap for performance
  • 9. Mimic to empathise
  • Imitate to comprehend
  • Many of these studies support a theory about human life (and indeed all life) called 'embodied cognition'. The idea is that we don't just think with our minds, we also think with our bodies. Our mind isn't a brain in a jar, it is connected to a body which moves around in an environment.
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    simple yet powerful
Maggie Verster

The Innovative Educator: 5 Steps to Harnessing the Power of Cells in Education Today - 28 views

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    Even teachers like this can begin harnessing the power of cell phones to enrich teaching and learning starting now...even if they're banned, even if your students don't all have them, and even if you haven't done anything in advance to prepare introducing them into your class. You can begin today by following these five steps which you can implement in your own classroom as well as share with administrators and other teachers so they can begin doing the same.
Rob Reynolds

Chrome Extension for student research tool - 0 views

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    Apture Highlights is a free tool, built from the ground up to let you take the power of Google search, and the richness YouTube, Flickr, Twitter, and Wikipedia with you to any site. Just highlight a phrase on any site to reveal the web's best content without ever leaving the page. Fast, powerful, and fun.
Carlos Quintero

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • pleads
  • weirdly poignant
  • lengthy
  • ...39 more annotations...
  • strolling
  • wayward
  • struggle.
  • godsend
  • Research
  • telltale
  • Unlike footnotes, to which they’re sometimes likened, hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them
  • Marshall McLuhan
  • altogether
  • It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. It almost seems that they go online to avoid reading in the traditional sense.
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read.
  • above
  • When we read online, she says, we tend to become “mere decoders of information.” Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
  • etched
  • We have to teach our minds how to translate the symbolic characters we see into the language we understand. And the media or other technologies we use in learning and practicing the craft of reading play an important part in shaping the neural circuits inside our brains
  • readers of ideograms, such as the Chinese, develop a mental circuitry for reading that is very different from the circuitry found in those of us whose written language employs an alphabet.
  • subtler
  • You are right,” Nietzsche replied, “our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts.” Under the sway of the machine, writes the German media scholar Friedrich A. Kittler, Nietzsche’s prose “changed from arguments to aphorisms, from thoughts to puns, from rhetoric to telegram style.”
  • James Olds, a professor of neuroscience who directs the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, says that even the adult mind “is very plastic.
  • “intellectual technologies”—the tools that extend our mental rather than our physical capacities—we inevitably begin to take on the qualities of those technologies
  • “disassociated time from human events and helped create the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences.”
  • The “abstract framework of divided time” became “the point of reference for both action and thought.”
  • , Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation
  • widespread
  • The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level.
  • The Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It’s becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and TV.
  • gewgaws,
  • thanks to the growing power that computer engineers and software coders wield over our intellectual lives,
  • “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”
  • For us, working on search is a way to work on artificial intelligence.”
  • Certainly if you had all the world’s information directly attached to your brain, or an artificial brain that was smarter than your brain, you’d be better off.
  • to solve problems that have never been solved before
  • worrywart
  • shortsighted
  • eloquently
  • drained
  • “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,
  • as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.
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    Is Google Making Us Stupid?
Carlos Quintero

Online Education in Era of 'Social Web'(The Korea Times) - 0 views

  • This type of education has been working amazingly well at IE for a number of years. However, we recently realized it wasn’t enough. With the advent of the so-called ``Web 2.0’’ ― ``the Web of the people’’ or ``the social web,’’ students find powerful tools to enrich their educational experience. And whilst it’s probably unnecessary for the school to provide such tools ― we are, in most cases, dealing with free tools where anyone can open accounts with just a valid e-mail address ― it is required to understand their powers and possibilities.
  • This type of education has been working amazingly well at IE for a number of years. However, we recently realized it wasn’t enough. With the advent of the so-called ``Web 2.0’’ ― ``the Web of the people’’ or ``the social web,’’ students find powerful tools to enrich their educational experience. And whilst it’s probably unnecessary for the school to provide such tools ― we are, in most cases, dealing with free tools where anyone can open accounts with just a valid e-mail address ― it is required to understand their powers and possibilities.
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    Online Education in Era of 'Social Web' Artículo sobre la educación en la era de la Web Social
J Black

ed4wb » Blog Archive » The New Bottom-up Authority - 0 views

  • It appears that most teachers today underestimate the amount of learning that is happening among youth outside of schools.  Since this informal learning sometimes dubbed “hanging out”, “messing around” or “geeking out”  happens outside of the classroom and doesn’t look like traditional learning, it’s easy for educators to miss. The quality and quantity of learning, the process by which it occurs, and the way authority is established in these informal environments, should be something that teachers become familiar with. Will Richardson, who writes extensively on these matters, believes that, “One of the biggest challenges educators face right now is figuring out how to help students create, navigate, and grow the powerful, individualized networks of learning that bloom on the Web and helping them do this effectively, ethically, and safely.” (see article)
  • It appears that most teachers today underestimate the amount of learning that is happening among youth outside of schools.  Since this informal learning sometimes dubbed “hanging out”, “messing around” or “geeking out”  happens outside of the classroom and doesn’t look like traditional learning, it’s easy for educators to miss. The quality and quantity of learning, the process by which it occurs, and the way authority is established in these informal environments, should be something that teachers become familiar with. Will Richardson, who writes extensively on these matters, believes that, “One of the biggest challenges educators face right now is figuring out how to help students create, navigate, and grow the powerful, individualized networks of learning that bloom on the Web and helping them do this effectively, ethically, and safely.” (see article)
  • It appears that most teachers today underestimate the amount of learning that is happening among youth outside of schools.  Since this informal learning sometimes dubbed “hanging out”, “messing around” or “geeking out”  happens outside of the classroom and doesn’t look like traditional learning, it’s easy for educators to miss. The quality and quantity of learning, the process by which it occurs, and the way authority is established in these informal environments, should be something that teachers become familiar with. Will Richardson, who writes extensively on these matters, believes that, “One of the biggest challenges educators face right now is figuring out how to help students create, navigate, and grow the powerful, individualized networks of learning that bloom on the Web and helping them do this effectively, ethically, and safely.” (see article)
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  • Schools, in general, are not taking advantage of the power of peer-based learning or the benefits of a more decentralized type of expertise which lies outside of its ivory walls.
  • The same study later describes a writer’s heightened sense of authenticity that comes from peer feedback as opposed to school evaluations: “It’s something I can do in my spare time, be creative and write and not have to be graded,” because, “you know how in school you’re creative, but you’re doing it for a grade so it doesn’t really count?”
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    The top-down, authoritarian model found in most classrooms today looks very different from the model many students experience when they learn online. The classroom's hierarchical approach, with the sage on the stage, requires, (and, ultimately demands) passivity and deference on the part of the learner. Informal, interest-driven networked learning, with its access to large stores of information and variety of opinion, on the other hand, takes a much different view of authority. It's usually peer based, largely democratic, meritocratic, often creates dissonance due to variety and demands evaluation. Knowing what we do about active learning, one would seem clearly superior to the other.
J Black

A WEB-EMPOWERED REVOLUTION IN TEACHING - TEDChris: The untweetable - 0 views

  • Five years ago, an amazing teacher or professor with the ability to truly catalyze the lives of his or her students could realistically hope to impact maybe 100 people each year. Today that same teacher can have their words spread on video to millions of eager students.
    • J Black
       
      Viral learning - think of it!
  • Driving this unexpected phenomenon is the fact that the physical cost of distributing a recorded talk or lecture anywhere in the world via the internet has fallen effectively to zero
  • Indeed the very definition of "great teacher" will expand, as numerous others outside the profession with the ability to communicate important ideas find a new incentive to make that talent available to the world. Additionally every existing teacher can greatly amplify their own abilities by inviting into their classroom, on video, the world's greatest scientists, visionaries and tutors.
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  • But a young girl born in Africa today will probably have access in 10 years' time to a cell phone with a high-resolution screen, a web connection, and more power than the computer you own today. We can imagine her obtaining face-to-face insight and encouragement from her choice of the world's great teachers. She will get a chance to be what she can be. And she might just end up being the person who saves the planet for our grandchildren.
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    But a young girl born in Africa today will probably have access in 10 years' time to a cell phone with a high-resolution screen, a web connection, and more power than the computer you own today. We can imagine her obtaining face-to-face insight and encouragement from her choice of the world's great teachers. She will get a chance to be what she can be. And she might just end up being the person who saves the planet for our grandchildren.
  •  
    But a young girl born in Africa today will probably have access in 10 years' time to a cell phone with a high-resolution screen, a web connection, and more power than the computer you own today. We can imagine her obtaining face-to-face insight and encouragement from her choice of the world's great teachers. She will get a chance to be what she can be. And she might just end up being the person who saves the planet for our grandchildren.
Judy Robison

Infinite Thinking Machine - 0 views

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    powerful web resources that use the increasing amount of primary source materials online and have the power to engage students using digital tools and their desire to express themselves.
Tom Daccord

Beyond Current Horizons : Reworking the web, reworking the world: how web 2.0 is changing our society | Technology, children, schools and families - 24 views

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    Article by Justin Reich of Harvard Graduate School of Education and EdTechTeacher. Reich on Web 2.0: "There is no doubt that this democratization, these contributions from many millions of web participants, has produced a series of profound social, political and economic changes that this paper will seek to document. The changes inspired by the democratization of the web, however, will not of necessity lead to a more equitable distribution of power and resources in our society. The future of the web will depend upon the degree to which this blossoming of online participation will allow ordinary citizens and consumers to have greater voice and influence in shaping society and the degree to which powerful political and commercial interests can co-opt and constrain the surge of online enthusiasm in the support of the established hierarchy. "
LUCIAN DUMA

BLOGGING USING WEB 2.0 AND SOCIAL MEDIA IN EDUCATION IN XXI CENTURY: Building a powerful #PLN #edchat #iste using gr8 #edtech20 #edtools in XXI Century Education Part 2 #aplanet - 0 views

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    Building a powerful #PLN #edchat #iste using gr8 #edtech20 #edtools in XXI Century Education Part 2 #aplanet . Pls add comments , share and retweet 
Hindie Dershowitz

PowerPoint Tutorials and Help at Brainy Betty - 0 views

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    great tutorials and videos on ways to use Power Point and how to create in Power Point
sanjay rajure

How to remove Power Antivirus 2009 - 0 views

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    This article explains how to remove a fake/ rogue security application called Power Antivirus 2009
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