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Phil Taylor

We are not addicted to smartphones, we are addicted to social interaction - 4 views

  • Healthy urges can become unhealthy addictions
  • Turning off push notifications and setting up appropriate times to check your phone can go a long way to regain control over
  • workplace policies "that prohibit evening and weekend emails" are also important
John Evans

Demonized Smartphones Are Just Our Latest Technological Scapegoat | WIRED - 4 views

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    "A wave of concern about the ill effects of smartphones and their apps echoes fears of earlier innovations, including TV, the printing press, and writing itself."
Phil Taylor

50 Reasons It's Time For Smartphones In Every Classroom - 2 views

  • To be clear–learning can happen in the absence of technology. Integrated poorly, technology can subdue, distract, stifle, and obscure the kind of personal interactions between learner, content, peer, and performance that lead to learning results.
John Evans

What is "brain hacking"? Tech insiders on why you should care - CBS News - 0 views

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    "Have you ever wondered if all those people you see staring intently at their smartphones -- nearly everywhere, and at all times -- are addicted to them? According to a former Google product manager you are about to hear from, Silicon Valley is engineering your phone, apps and social media to get you hooked. He is one of the few tech insiders to publicly acknowledge that the companies responsible for programming your phones are working hard to get you and your family to feel the need to check in constantly. Some programmers call it "brain hacking" and the tech world would probably prefer you didn't hear about it. But Tristan Harris openly questions the long-term consequences of it all and we think it's worth putting down your phone to listen."
John Evans

The Generation That Doesn't Remember Life Before Smartphones - 3 views

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    "Down a locker-lined hallway at Lawrence Central High School in Indianapolis, Zac Felli, a junior, walks to his first class of the day. He wears tortoiseshell glasses and is built like he could hit a ball hard. He has enviable skin for a teenager, smooth as a suede jacket. Over one shoulder he carries a slim forest-green and tan messenger bag that would have been social suicide in 1997. But 1997 was the year Zac was born, so he wouldn't know anything about that.

    A squat, taupe monolith flanked by parking lots, Lawrence Central smells like old brick and floor polish and grass. Its gleaming floors squeak if you move your foot a certain way. The school has existed on precisely this spot of land since 1963: maroon block letters over the door, tang of chlorine from the indoor pool. None of that has changed. Here's what has: After Zac turns the doorknob of Room 113 and takes his seat in Japanese III, he reaches into his shoulder bag, pushes aside his black iPhone 5S and Nintendo 3DS XL, and pulls out his Microsoft Surface Pro 3 tablet with purple detachable keyboard, which he props up on his desk using its kickstand. By touching a white and purple icon on his screen, he opens Microsoft OneNote, a program in which each of his classes is separated into digital journals and then into digital color-coded tabs for greater specificity. And then, without a piece of paper in sight and before an adult has said a word, he begins to learn."
John Evans

Option 3: Actually USE the smartphones | Dangerously Irrelevant - 0 views

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    "Murphy & Beland's recent study is making the rounds online, particularly among those who are eager to find reasons to ban learning technologies in classrooms. The economists found that banning mobile phones helped improve student achievement on standardized test scores, with the biggest gains seen by low-achieving and at-risk students. Here are my thoughts on this…

    The outcome measure is standardized test score improvement. Is that all you care about or do you have a bigger, more complex vision for student learning? For instance, creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, and problem-solving are difficult to assess with a standardized test. Most schools I know didn't adopt their learning technology initiatives for the sole purpose of test score improvement. (if they did, how sad is that?)"
John Evans

40 Uses For Smartphones in School | ExamTime - 7 views

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    "As Alanis Morissette once said, 'isn't it ironic'. After years of struggle between teachers and students and the use of smartphones in school, new educational trends are actually encouraging the use of these devices.



    The mobile, cellphone or smartphone is not just used for WhatsApp, Facebook or Angry Birds, it can be used in a multitude of ways from an educational perspective. Don't believe us? Keep reading. In this article we bring together 40 uses for smartphones in school."
Phil Taylor

Smartphones: From Toy to Tool | Edutopia - 1 views

  • Tabscott, Mettler, and Matthews suggest that you follow these steps to begin incorporating smartphones into classroom activities.
John Evans

How Smartphones Have Unleashed Humanity's Creative Potential | Gadget Lab | WIRED - 0 views

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    "Now it's the phone's turn. The smartphone began with a promise of productivity. Its first "killer app," in the parlance of those developing for it, was email. Smartphones let us send messages without launching a computer; that's what made them smart. Web browsing followed, but the device was still seen as a surrogate for the computer at your desk-something to keep you productive while out in the world. Today, though, the phone has become something else. The smartphone, like the PC and the Internet before it, has turned into a unique outlet for our creative impulses, and it will affect our creative lives even more fundamentally."
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