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alexandra m. pickett

Seven Principles of Effective Teaching - A Practical Lens for Evaluating Online Courses - 0 views

  • Principle 1: Good Practice Encourages Student-Faculty Contact
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      Our SLN research shows that the highest predictor of satisfaction with online instruction among online students is the quantity and quality of interaction with the online instructor. How would you move that research finding into practice in your own online course? How do you see that understanding expressed in our course ETAP 687?
  • Principle 2: Good Practice Encourages Cooperation Among Students
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      The second highest predictor that we have found in our SLN research of satisfaction and high levels of reported learning among online students is the quantity and quality of interaction between students. Knowing that, what implications might that have in the design of online activities in your online course?
  • The "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education," originally published in the AAHE Bulletin (Chickering & Gamson, 1987), are a popular framework for evaluating teaching in traditional, face-to-face courses. The principles are based on 50 years of higher education research (Chickering & Reisser, 1993). A faculty inventory (Johnson Foundation, "Faculty," 1989) and an institutional inventory (Johnson Foundation, "Institutional," 1989) based on these principles have helped faculty members and higher-education institutions examine and improve their teaching practices.
alexandra m. pickett

Visible Knowledge Project Home Page - 0 views

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    i added this becuase it looked interesting.
alexandra m. pickett

Virtual Teacher Education: Affordances and Constraints of Teaching Teachers Online - 0 views

  • ASYNCHRONOUS ONLINE ENVIRONMENTS . . . AFFORDCONSTRAIN accesscontext mindfulness, reflectivityinterpersonal communication personal expressionbias, values equity, multiple perspectivesauthority, narrative breadthdepth multiple symbol systemsconsistency construction of knowledgeinstruction association, connectionsyllogism, hierarchy bricolage, juxtapositionlogical progression of ideas Figure 1: Affordances & Constraints
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      what do you think about these reflections?
alexandra m. pickett

Issues in Distance Learning - 1 views

  • This review of literature and current information related to distance learning is an expansion and update of Schlosser and Anderson's (1994) literature review for the Iowa model of distance education. Additional reports were obtained through the Pacific Mountain Network, the ERIC database, electronic communications via Internet with administrators of open universities and open learning agencies throughout the world, collections of manuscripts and documents in the Department of Instructional Technology and Special Education at the University of Colorado at Denver, and personal communications with distance education developers at professional conferences as well as school districts in the Greater Denver area. It is intended as a companion piece to Sherry and Morse's (1995) Needs Assessment for Distance Education, as well as background information for other projects in telecommunications and distance learning.
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      this is an early lit review on distance learning that i thought you would find interesting.
Robert Braathe

Aliant launches Online Learning Centre - 0 views

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    A unique concept in online learning.
alexandra m. pickett

Sloan-C - Publications - Journal: JALN - Vol4:2 Student Satisfaction and Perceived Lear... - 0 views

  • For new SLN faculty the first stage in their development as on-line instructors is to get on-line and access the SLN Faculty Developer Gateway (http://SLN.suny.edu/developer). There, they are introduced to the SLN faculty development and course design processes. They participate in a facilitated on-line conference to network with our growing community of on-line instructors and to get the feel for on-line discussion in the asynchronous Web environment. In stage two, faculty begin to conceptualize their courses. They complete an on-line orientation to the Web course environment and they also have the opportunity to observe a variety of live on-line courses that have been selected as models to help them get a sense of the possibilities and to get the look and feel of the on-line classroom. Stage three is the SLN Course Development stage. They are asked to attend three workshops. At the first workshop, faculty receive a customized course template created in Lotus Notes, access to our networked system and on-line resources, and a step-by-step guide for building the components of their course. They are also assigned an instructional design partner to work with throughout their first course-development and delivery cycles and have access to a Help Desk for technology support. Note that it is not until stage three of our faculty development process that faculty are introduced to the technology that they will use to create their course. Our primary focus is on developing and supporting on-line faculty and effective on-line pedagogy, not on the technology. 
    • alexandra m. pickett
       
      what are your thoughts on this passage?
    • Robert Braathe
       
      Getting faculty involved in the system of communicating in a new way is very effective. If we expect our students to be involved, we need to (as faculty) get immersed in communicating in these new ways to make the technology effective. Otherwise, the technology is obsolete
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    Student Satisfaction and Perceived Learning with On-line Courses: Principles and Examples from the SUNY Learning Network Eric Fredericksen, Alexandra Pickett, Peter Shea State University of New York William Pelz Herkimer County Community College http://www.sloan-c.org/publications/jaln/v4n2/pdf/v4n2_fredericksen.pdf Karen Swan University of Albany
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    doing a demo ignore this.
alexandra m. pickett

Sloan-C - Publications - Journal: JALN - 0 views

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    The aim of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks is to describe original work in asynchronous learning networks (ALN), including experimental results. Our mission is to provide practitioners in online education with knowledge about the very best research in online learning. Papers emphasizing results, backed by data are the norm. Occasionally, papers reviewing broad areas are published, including critical reviews of thematic areas. Papers useful to administrators are welcome. Entire issues are published from time-to-time around single topic or disciplinary areas. The Journal adheres to traditional standards of double-blind peer review, and authors are encouraged to provide quantitative data; currently JALN's acceptance rate is 25%. The original objective of the Journal was to establish ALN as a field by publishing articles from authoritative and reliable sources. The Journal is now a major resource for knowledge about online learning.
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    This jounal is a major resource for knowlege about online learning.
alexandra m. pickett

Sloan-C - Publications - Journal: JALN - Vol8:3 - 0 views

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    Required reading for ETAP 687
alexandra m. pickett

Sloan-C - Publications - Journal: JALN - Vol5:2: Assessing Teaching Presence in a Compu... - 0 views

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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a tool developed for the purpose of assessing teaching presence in online courses that make use of computer conferencing, and preliminary results from the use of this tool. The method of analysis is based on Garrison, Anderson, and Archer's [1] model of critical thinking and practical inquiry in a computer conferencing context. The concept of teaching presence is constitutively defined as having three categories - design and organization, facilitating discourse, and direct instruction. Indicators that we search for in the computer conference transcripts identify each category. Pilot testing of the instrument reveals interesting differences in the extent and type of teaching presence found in different graduate level online courses.\nhttp://www.aln.org/publications/jaln/v5n2/pdf/v5n2_anderson.pdf
alexandra m. pickett

No Significant Difference Phenomenon Website - 0 views

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    No Significant Difference Phenomenon\n\nThis website has been designed to serve as a companion piece to Thomas L. Russell's book, "The No Significant Difference Phenomenon" (2001, IDECC, fifth edition). Mr. Russell's book is a fully indexed, comprehensive research bibliography of 355 research reports, summaries and papers that document no significant differences (NSD) in student outcomes between alternate modes of education delivery, with a foreword by Dr. Richard E. Clark. Previous editions of the book were provided electronically; the fifth edition is the first to be made available in print from IDECC (The International Distance Education Certification Center).
alexandra m. pickett

Factors Influencing Faculty Satisfaction with Asynchronous Teaching and Learning in the... - 0 views

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    Eric Fredericksen, Alexandra Pickett, Peter Shea State University of New York William Pelz Herkimer County Community College Karen Swan University of Albany Abstract "…100% of faculty reported that they were either satisfied or very satisfied with the SUNY Learning Network." Spring 1999 SLN Faculty Satisfaction Survey The State University of New York (SUNY) Learning Network (SLN) is the on-line instructional program created for the 64 colleges and nearly 400,000 students of SUNY. The foundation of the program is freedom from schedule and location constraints for our faculty and students. The primary goals of the SLN are to bring SUNY's diverse and high-quality instructional programs within the reach of learners everywhere, and to be the best provider of asynchronous instruction for learners in New York State and beyond. We believe that these goals cannot be achieved unless faculty receives appropriate support. This paper will examine factors that have contributed to the high level of faculty satisfaction we have achieved in the SLN. The analysis will be done on several levels. This first section will look at the SLN at a program-wide level and will provide information regarding the systemic implementation of our asynchronous learning environment. The second section examines issues that contribute to on-line teaching satisfaction from a faculty- development and course-design perspective. This section will present the evolution of the four-stage faculty development process and a seven-step course design process that was developed by SLN and comment on lessons learned. The third section presents results from the SLN Faculty Satisfaction Survey conducted in spring 1999. This section examines factors from a quantitative analysis that significantly contributes to faculty satisfaction with on-line teaching and offers recommendations for course and program design based on these factors. The fourth section e
alexandra m. pickett

The e-mature learner - 0 views

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    required reading
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