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Anne Bubnic

Identity Theft and Children - 0 views

  • Financial identity theft: This most commonly occurs when the Social Security Number (SSN) and name is used to establish new lines of credit.
  • Criminal identity theft: This typically occurs when a person “borrows” the information of the minor to get a driver’s license or uses the child’s identity when caught in a criminal act. This person may be an illegal immigrant who bought the information or a relative who has had a license suspended or revoked.
  • Identity Cloning: Cloning is when a identity thief uses an identity for financial, criminal, and governmental purposes. Most frequently, profilers have people in positions where they are able to collect information about minors and then sell it on the black market. The most frequent purchasers of this information, in our experience, are illegal immigrants or people who are trying to “restart” their lives and avoid arrest
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    A fact sheet from the Identity Theft Resource Center identifying three kinds of identity theft: financial identity theft, criminal identity theft and identity cloning.
Anne Bubnic

Digital Native Project Wiki [Berkman Center] - 0 views

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    An academic research team -- joining people from the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School and the Research Center for Information Law at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland -- is hosting and working on the core of this wiki, which illustrates the beginning stages of a larger research project on Digital Natives. The site offers a wealth of information in 10 topic areas:
    Digital Identity, digital safety, digital privacy, digital creativity, digital opportunities, digital information overload, digital information quality, digital piracy and digital education.

Anne Bubnic

MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning - MIT Press - 0 views

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    The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning examines the effect of digital media tools on how people learn, network, communicate, and play, and how growing up with these tools may affect a person's sense of self, how they express themselves, and their ability to learn, exercise judgment, and think systematically.

    Six topics are available as free downloads online:
    Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Current Volume
    Learning Race and Ethnicity: Youth and Digital Media
    Digital Young, Innovation, and the Unexpected
    The Ecology of Games: Connecting Youth, Games, and Learning
    Digital Media, Youth, and Credibility
    Civic Life Online: Learning How Digital Media Can Engage Youth

Anne Bubnic

This Is Me: UK Digital Identity Project - 0 views

  • his Is Me project aims to look at ways of helping people to learn more about what makes up their Digital Identity (DI) and at ways of developing and enhancing it.  "Digital Identity" is made up of multiple parts - it isn't just what we have published about ourself on the web, but also includes things other people have published about us.
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    This Is Me project aims to look at ways of helping people to learn more about what makes up their Digital Identity (DI) and at ways of developing and enhancing it. "Digital Identity" is made up of multiple parts - it isn't just what we have published about ourself on the web, but also includes things other people have published about us.
Anne Bubnic

Deter - Detect - Defend Against Identity Theft [Video] - 0 views

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    9-minute video that would be good to show in a digital citizenship class. Identity theft is a serious crime. People whose identities have been stolen can spend months or years and thousands of dollars cleaning up the mess the thieves have made of a good name and credit record. In the meantime, victims of identity theft may lose job opportunities, be refused loans for education, housing, or cars, and even get arrested for crimes they didn't commit. Humiliation, anger, and frustration are among the feelings victims experience as they navigate the process of rescuing their identity.
Anne Bubnic

Top 5 Ways Teens Are Compromising Their Identities Online [Video] - 0 views

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    From Qwest Communications. Identity theft is the fastest growing crime in America with 18-29 year olds being the largest group of victims. Educating 13-18 year olds about how and why they are being targeted is critical in preventing new victims. Clean credit and a low level of identity theft awareness are two top reasons teens are targeted. A new survey from Qwest Communications Teen Council Program shows that an alarming number of teens are making it easier for thieves to steal their identity. With answers from more than 1,600 students about their online habits, the report identified the top 5 ways teens are compromising their identities.\n
Anne Bubnic

Teaching Kids to Manage their Digital Footprint - 2 views

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    Teaching kids to manage their Digital Footprint really starts with the adults. Teachers can't teach this effectively if they, themselves have not managed their own digital footprint. It is also important not to confuse managing a digital footprint with being hidden or private. Branding our identities has become more and more important in the digital age and if students and teachers aren't actively managing their digital footprint, then who is?
Jason Epstein

Digital Tattoo - 4 views

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    Tutorial. Just like a tattoo, your digital reputation is an expression of yourself. It's highly visible, and hard to remove. Explore how your online identity affects you, your friends, your school and your job - for better and for worse - and how to make informed choices.
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    This is AWESOME! Thank you!
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    "In short, it is your digital identity. Just like a tattoo, your digital reputation is an expression of yourself. it is formed and added to by you and others over time."
Anne Bubnic

Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation - 0 views

  • Remember that nothing is temporary online. The virtual world is full of opportunities to interact and share with people around the world. It's also a place where nothing is temporary and there are no "take-backs." A lot of what you do and say online can be retrieved online even if you delete it — and it's a breeze for others to copy, save, and forward your information.
  • Mark your profiles as private. Anyone who accesses your profile on a social networking site can copy or screen-capture information and photos that you may not want the world to see. Don't rely on the site's default settings. Read each site's instructions or guidelines to make sure you're doing everything you can to keep your material private.
  • Safeguard your passwords and change them frequently. If someone logs on to a site and pretends to be you, they can trash your identity. Pick passwords that no one will guess (don't use your favorite band or your dog's birthday; try thinking of two utterly random nouns and mixing in a random number), and change them often. Never share them with anyone other than your parents or a trusted adult. Not even your best friend, boyfriend, or girlfriend should know your private passwords!
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  • Don't post inappropriate or sexually provocative pictures or comments. Things that seem funny or cool to you right now might not seem so cool years from now — or when a teacher, admissions officer, or potential employer sees them. A good rule of thumb is: if you'd feel weird if your grandmother, coach, or best friend's parents saw it, it's probably not a good thing to post. Even if it's on a private page, it could be hacked or copied and forwarded.
  • Don't respond to inappropriate requests. Research shows that a high percentage of teens receive inappropriate messages and solicitations when they're online. These can be scary, strange, and even embarrassing. If you feel harassed by a stranger or a friend online, tell an adult you trust immediately. It is never a good idea to respond. Responding is only likely to make things worse, and might result in you saying something you wish you hadn't.
  • Take a breather to avoid "flaming." File this one under "nothing's temporary online": If you get the urge to fire off an angry IM or comment on a message board or blog, it's a good idea to wait a few minutes, calm down, and remember that the comments may stay up (with your screen name right there) long after you've regained your temper and maybe changed your mind.
  • Learn about copyrights. It's a good idea to learn about copyright laws and make sure you don't post, share, or distribute copyrighted images, songs, or files. Sure, you want to share them, but you don't want to accidentally do anything illegal that can come back to haunt you later.
  • Check yourself. Chances are, you've already checked your "digital footprint" — nearly half of all online users do. Try typing your screen name or email address into a search engine and see what comes up. That's one way to get a sense of what others see as your online identity.
  • Take it offline. In general, if you have questions about the trail you're leaving online, don't be afraid to ask a trusted adult. Sure, you might know more about the online world than a lot of adults do, but they have life experience that can help.
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    Advice for teens from www.kidshealth.org. Here are some things to consider to safeguard your online identity and reputation:
    1. Remember that nothing is temporary online
    2. Mark your profile as private.
    3. Safeguard your passwords and change them regularly.
    4. Don't post inappropriate or sexually provocative pictures or comments.
    5. Don't respond to inappropriate requests
    6. Take a breather to avoid "flaming."
    7. Learn about copyrights.
    8. Check your digital footprint.
    9. Take it offline.
Rhondda Powling

Young People, Ethics, and the New Digital Media | The MIT Press - 4 views

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    "The authors argue that five key issues are at stake in the new media: identity, privacy, ownership and authorship, credibility, and participation. Drawing on evidence from informant interviews, emerging scholarship on new media, and theoretical insights from psychology, sociology, political science, and cultural studies, the report explores the ways in which youth may be redefining these concepts as they engage with new digital media."
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    "The authors argue that five key issues are at stake in the new media: identity, privacy, ownership and authorship, credibility, and participation. Drawing on evidence from informant interviews, emerging scholarship on new media, and theoretical insights from psychology, sociology, political science, and cultural studies, the report explores the ways in which youth may be redefining these concepts as they engage with new digital media."
Anne Bubnic

Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media - 1 views

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    Conventional wisdom about young people's use of digital technology often equates generational identity with technology identity: today's teens seem constantly plugged in to video games, social networks sites, and text messaging. Yet there is little actual research that investigates the intricate dynamics of youth's social and recreational use of digital media. Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out fills this gap, reporting on an ambitious three-year ethnographic investigation into how young people are living and learning with new media in varied settings-at home, in after school programs, and in online spaces.
Anne Bubnic

Howard Gardner on Digital Youth [Video] - 6 views

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    Howard Gardner, the founder of multiple-intelligences theory discusses the challenges ethics and education face as digital media become more prevalent. Through his GOODPLAY PROJECT, he examines the ethical sense of young people. He ooks at five elements related to what it means to be ethical with new media: sense of identity, sense of privacy, sense of ownership/authorship, trustworthiness and credibility, and what it means to participate in a community.
Anne Bubnic

Identity Theft Portal - 0 views

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    Learn everything you need to know about identity theft, credit card theft and fraud alerts and how to protect yourself. The portal provides both generic and state-by-state information. This resource would be good for a digital citizenship class and includes information on protecting both children and adults.
Anne Bubnic

Students plagued by Internet fraud - 4 views

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    October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and the National Cyber Security Alliance is looking to raise awareness among college students to help them stay safe and secure online. According to the 2010 Identity Fraud Survey Report, college students lost five times more money than any other age group as a result of identity fraud or other online fraud situations.
yc c

Single Sign On & Token Based Authentication - Auth0 - 0 views

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    We're a team of developers that got tired of the friction caused by complex identity environments. So we built a zero-friction, infinitely extensible, enterprise-class web-scale cloud solution that makes identity easy.
Anne Bubnic

A Great Guide on Teaching Students about Digital Footprint - 10 views

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    Have you ever Googled yourself ? Have you ever checked your virtual identity? Do you know that you leave a digital footprint every time you get online? Do you know that whatever you do online is accumulated into a digital dossier traceable by others ?
Anne Bubnic

Your Digital Footprint - 0 views

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    Article discusses "identity" in terms of DIGITAL FOOTPRINT (your online digital trail) and DIGITAL SHADOW (public/private information that is known about you from commercial transactions etc).
Anne Bubnic

Identity Theft: Stolen Futures [Video] - 0 views

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    This brief 11 minute video is a good introduction to protecting oneself against identity theft, but is especially applicable to raising the awareness of young people, many of whom are completely unaware of the dangers of exposing personal identifying information freely.
Anne Bubnic

Identity Theft Resource Center | Teen Space - 1 views

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    Identity theft can affect everyone, including teenagers. It is important for you to know what information is needed to steal your identity and the best ways of protecting your information. Your information, in the wrong hands, can 'jack your life!' The site includes lesson plans, games and a video.
Anne Bubnic

An Educator's Guide To Responsible Technology Use [pdf] - 3 views

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    26 page guide for Educators on Safety, Security and Ethics produced for K-12 students and teachers by the IIIA/James Madison University in cooperation with the Office of Ed Tech for the State of Virginia. Covers digital communication topics like ethics, digital footprint, flaming, spyware, viruses, hoaxes, spoofing & phishing, spam, identity theft, privacy, cyberpredators, social networking, gaming, and bullying via cell phone.
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