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Anne Bubnic

Henry Sibley Presents: Managing Your Digital Footprint [Video] - 10 views

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    Excellent video developed for students at Sibley High School. College administrators and employers comment on how student representation in social media (digital footprint) influences college admission practices and hiring decisions.
Anne Bubnic

Google Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum - 22 views

Google has partnered with child safety experts at iKeepSafe to develop classroom lesson plans. Three classes are now available with pre- and post-assessments.

ad4dcss digital citizenship digital footprint identity theft digital literacy authentic sources evaluation lesson plan

started by Anne Bubnic on 30 Jul 13 no follow-up yet
Anne Bubnic

A Great Guide on Teaching Students about Digital Footprint - 10 views

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    Have you ever Googled yourself ? Have you ever checked your virtual identity? Do you know that you leave a digital footprint every time you get online? Do you know that whatever you do online is accumulated into a digital dossier traceable by others ?
Megan Black

Eminent Tech: Beware of this App - 7 views

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    Snapchat is becoming wildly popular with teens and tweens. The idea being that photos and texts self destruct after a few seconds. You can probably guess how it can and is being misused.
Anne Bubnic

What Petraeus affair teaches about email. - 5 views

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    Those who still have illusions about online privacy might want to consider the old adage "I can keep secrets; it's the people I tell who can't."
Anne Bubnic

What to Do About Consequences of Poor Decisions on Social Media [Video] - 5 views

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    Web Wise Kids discusses the consequences of poor decision making on social media, and gives advice on what to do to rectify such situations.
Anne Bubnic

How Recruiters Use Social Networks to Screen Candidates - 8 views

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    Social media monitoring service Reppler recently surveyed more than 300 hiring professionals to determine when and how job recruiters are screening job candidates on different social networks. Results provide really good insight on how comments displayed in a social networking setting may have positively (or negatively) influenced a decision to hire.
Anne Bubnic

Teachable Moment: Think Twice Before Sharing on Social Networks - 6 views

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    How one person's rant against his own company in a public media forum brought far more attention than he desired.
Anne Bubnic

Six Reasons Why Kids Should Know How to Blog | - 8 views

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    1. Create positive digital footprints 2. Communicate with digital tools 3. Provide transparency for parents & families 4. Demonstrate effective digital citizenship 5. Learn new ways of thinking about tools 6. Global audiences/pride in work
Anne Bubnic

Could you pass a Facebook background check? - 6 views

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    The next time you apply for a job, don't be surprised if you have to agree to a social-media background check. Many U.S. companies and recruiters are now looking at your Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and other accounts and blogs - even YouTube - to paint a clearer picture of who you are.
Anne Bubnic

Erasing Individual's Digital Past - 2 views

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    Reputation.com is among a growing corps of online reputation managers that promise to make clients look better online. In an age when a person's reputation is increasingly defined by Google, Facebook and Twitter, these services offer what is essentially an online makeover, improving how someone appears on the Internet, usually by spotlighting flattering features and concealing negative ones.
Anne Bubnic

6 Tips for Facebook Security [Video] - 4 views

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    Video produced by AVG Internet Security. Offers great privacy tips, scenarios and think-abouts for kids. Uses humor and exaggeration to make the point.
anonymous

Would you want a digital footprint from birth? - 6 views

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    It's important for parents today to realize they are creating an online dossier for a human being that will be with them for years to come. It's worth considering what kind of digital footprint or online history you want to leave for your child. When your child is a teenager or adult, what will they make of the information you are currently uploading now? 5% of babies under 2 have social media profiles, 7% have email addresses, 81% of two-year-olds have a digital footprint. The irony here is that Zogby International just published a survey of parents that found 90% of them think their kids share too much information online and social networks aren't doing enough to protect them. See the story at: http://bit.ly/CNNparentpoll
Anne Bubnic

Stalking in English Class - 5 views

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    Creative lesson on digital footprint and online safety in Clarence Fisher's class!
anonymous

Personas | Metropath(ologies) - 7 views

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    From the MIT Media Lab. Great resource. Find out how others view you on the web.
Anne Bubnic

Digital Literacy: Detecting Lies and Staying True [Video] - 5 views

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    Another video in the Google/YouTube Online Safety series. Covers online behavior and uncovering valid resources. Many of these resources are available in both English and Spanish.
Yoon Soo Lim

Digital Footprint - 0 views

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    this would be an interesting activity for students to do in their own context.  If you're blogging with students or creating any kind of online digital content, have them create their own digital footprints and then analyse what they've created this past year.
Anne Bubnic

Eight Tips for Monitoring and Protecting Your Online Reputation - 9 views

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    Here are 8 tips to monitor and protect one's online reputation from the U.S. Government Information Security Blog: Search your name. Type your first and last name within quotation marks into several popular search engines to see where you are mentioned and in what context. Narrow your search and use keywords that apply only to you, such as your city, employer and industry association. Expand your search. Use similar techniques to search for your telephone numbers, home address, e-mail addresses, and personal website domain names. You should also search for your social security and credit card numbers to make sure they don't appear anywhere online. Read blogs. If any of your friends or coworkers have blogs or personal web pages on social networking sites, check them out to see if they are writing about or posting pictures of you. Sign up for alerts. Use the Google alert feature that automatically notifies you of any new mention of your name or other personal information. Limit your personal information. Tweet/chat/discuss regarding business and the emerging trends in your industry, but limit posting information on your personal life, which could be a subject of major scrutiny by recruiters and hiring managers. Also, be sure you know how organizations will use your information before you give it to them. Use privacy settings. Most social networking and photo-sharing sites allow you to determine who can access and respond to your content. If you're using a site that doesn't offer privacy settings, find another site. Choose your photos and language thoughtfully. You need to ensure that information posted online is written professionally without use of swear words and catchy phrases. Also, be very selective in posting photographs, and use your judgment to ensure that these photographs are how you want the world to see you. Take action If you find information about yourself online that is embarrassing or untrue, cont
Anne Bubnic

A Difference: Google Never Forgets - 3 views

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    Teachable moment about the significance of digital footprints and online reputation in today's job market, even beyond corporate America. This blog recounts the story of someone who advertised for a housekeeper on Craigslist, researched the job candidates' social networking history and then, reports on what they found.
Anne Bubnic

Internet Smarts: Interactive Case Studies - 5 views

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    This excellent series of interactive case studies explores 8 topics: Wireless, Social Networking, Digital Permanence, Cyberbullying, Misinformation, Fair Use, Privacy and Downloading. Through multimedia activities, students examine issues affecting schoolwork, class papers, entertainment activities and online safety. Units are illustrated with Nickelodeon-style graphics and include assessments of learning. "Power to Learn" is Cablevision's nationally recognized education initiative. Some of the resources here are available in Spanish.
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