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Anne Bubnic

Federal lawmaker targets cyber bullying - 0 views

  • "The Megan Meier Act would give prosecutors the tools t
  • Prompted by outrage over a Missouri teen's suicide after an internet hoax, United States Rep. Kenny Hulshof on May 22 introduced a bill that would impose federal criminal penalties for cyber bullying.
  • protect kids from the most egregious of online predatory attacks," Hulshof said in a statement.
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  • The effort in Congress comes a week after Missouri lawmakers approved a bill making cyber harassment illegal. The state measure revises Missouri law to cover harassment via computers, text messages, and other electronic devices.
  • Hulshof's bill would allow federal prosecutors to go after online messages meant "to coerce, intimidate, harass, or cause emotional distress" to others. Those convicted under the measure would face a fine or up to two years in jail.
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    Prompted by outrage over a Missouri teen's suicide after an internet hoax, United States Rep. Kenny Hulshof on May 22 introduced a bill that would impose federal criminal penalties for cyber bullying. "The Megan Meier Act would give prosecutors the tools to protect kids from the most egregious of online predatory attacks," Hulshof said in a statement. Hulshof's bill would allow federal prosecutors to go after online messages meant "to coerce, intimidate, harass, or cause emotional distress" to others. Those convicted under the measure would face a fine or up to two years in jail.
Anne Bubnic

The Impact of Cyberbullying [PDF] - 0 views

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    2005 Report by Dr. Beth Manke, Associate Professor, Human Development, California State University, Long Beach. Often the most dramatic incidents of cyberbullying get the attention of educators, parents and the authority. Those incidents that involve threats, particularly death threats and those that result in school shootings and suicide attempts prompt intervention for both the perpetrators and victims. We must remember, however, that all cyberbullying, even the less dramatic incidents including the spreading of rumors and saying mean things online can be harmful as they can erode a child's self esteem and confidence and lead to later academic difficulties, interpersonal problems and psychological distress.
Anne Bubnic

Penguins can fly! [BBC Video] - 0 views

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    Use this BBC video [4/1/07] as an icebreaker when teaching information literacy and digital citizenship. It will prompt a great conversations about the importance of critical thinking when examining information on the Web. [With thanks to Jane Krauss for the clever idea...]
Anne Bubnic

'Video-Gaming' Child Predators Offering Points For Nude Photos - 0 views

  • Maurer is warning parents to take precautions when it comes to gaming consoles because most are hooked to the Internet and anyone can be chatting with children during game play. IBSYS.ad.AdManager.registerPosition({ "iframe": false, "addlSz": "", "element": "ad_N6C0061.2D12", "interstitials": false, "beginDate": "", "endDate": "", "getSect": "", "name": "square", "qString": "", "width": "300", "height": "250", "section": "", "useId": "16995600", "interactive": false, "useSameCategory": false, "topic": "", "swSectionRoot": "", "useZone": "", "type": "DOM" }); "My theory on it is that predators are going to go where kids are, and kids are playing video games so it's a perfect place for them to be," Maurer said.
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    Child predators offering game points in exchange for nude images through Internet-connected video games have prompted a warning for parents. "Kids are playing games, and they are being asked to take photos of themselves naked in order to get game points," state attorney Cybercrime Detective Lt. David Maurer said. "There is not only the chatting version of the games but also a webcam involved."
Anne Bubnic

Cyberbullying The Real Threat on the Digital Playground - 0 views

  • "Parents are the key to this whole issue," explains Leasure. "They need to be involved and monitoring the computer and Internet activity of their kids. If they see something that isn't right, they need to act as parents and correct the issue."
  • parental awareness is truly the key to fixing this problem. If your child is the victim - or worse, the bully - it's time to step in. it's not being over-protective; it's trying to stop the current generation from 'virtually' destroying themselves emotionally
  • Cyberbullying Statistics: A recent survey of 395 students, ages 11 to 19, was conducted by the Kids/Teen Division of the Maine-based online safety organization Working To Halt Online Abuse. The study found that: � 28% of students have been cyberbullied, but... � Just over half tell their parents or another adult about it; of the students who did not report the cyberbullying, 25% felt it wasn't a big problem or didn't want to make a big deal out of it � 65% reported the cyberbullying was via IM, followed by email, MySpace, chat rooms and online games � 43% were cyberbullied by someone their age or in the same grade � 30% blocked or deleted the cyberbully, while 16% ignored them � 54 students admitted they had bullied somebody online themselves
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    While reports and stories in the media focusing on Internet predators have become all too frequent, the closer-to-home threat to our children may really be cyberbullying, also known as electronic or online bullying. A recent survey of 395 students (11 to 19 years old) found that 28% of students have been cyberbullied, and more than 1 in 7 admitted to acting as the bully."Cyberbullying could be the biggest online threat facing teens today," says James Leasure, co-founder of Pandora Corp. "Of course Internet predators do still exist, but statistically, kids have a much greater chance of being involved in some way with electronic bullying." Most cases of cyberbullying go undocumented because, fortunately, many kids are able to shrug off the 'unkind words' and look the other way. But there are some cases that make national headlines when they turn into tragedies, such as the Megan Meier case in 2006. Larger cases like this have prompted several states to adopt legislation that makes online bullying illegal.
Anne Bubnic

New York Teen "MindSpace" - 0 views

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    New York City's Department of Health launched its Mindspace program last week, an attempt to reach at-risk teens by creating MySpace pages for kids battling common mental health issues.
    Though many teens experience mental health issues, they are often reluctant to acknowledge them and seek help. When asked who they are most likely to talk with when they feel sad, more than 20% of teens NYC Teen said they talk to no one, one-third said they would talk to a friend only (31%), and just one-third said they would talk to an adult (32%). The Mindspace page responds to these issues with interactive features that raise awareness and combat stigma by helping teens identify with peers and prompting them to seek help.
Anne Bubnic

Olivia's Letters | PBS - 0 views

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    News coverage about a middle school student victimized by online and offline bullying has prompted a grassroots solidarity campaign. She's received over 1,400 letters of support so far, and it's serving as a teachable moment that no school should ignore. Olivia Gardner was just a sixth grader when the bullying began two years ago. Previously diagnosed with epilepsy, Olivia was tormented by her peers because of the disease. In school, they'd call her "retard." Online, they created an "Olivia Haters" page on MySpace and would use it to make fun of her. The school district eventually got involved, bringing in the families of the kids who were involved in the bullying, as well as holding a series of student assemblies on the problem. But it was too little, too late for Olivia, who soon transferred to another school.
Anne Bubnic

Implications for teachers who socialize with students online - 1 views

  • Always exercise extreme care when communicating online with students and if at all possible, avoid socializing. These measures, along with district policy that preempts the possibility of inappropriate relationships developing online between staff and students, seems the best way to go.
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    Significant concerns raised about student-teacher intractions in a social media environment, including the issue that students flirt. Relatedly, anything performed online by a public school employee - including information and images posted on social networking sites - will be used to judge the character of that individual. There is also the concern that the friends of the staff member may post unflattering information or tag inappropriate images of them which will quickly be used to prompt one major question: "Is this the kind of person we trust to be responsible for our children?"
Anne Bubnic

A Lawyer, Some Teens and a Fight Over 'Sexting' - 0 views

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    Revealing Images Sent Via Cellphones Prompt District Attorney to Offer Seminars but Threaten Felony Charges. Images had been discovered on cellphones confiscated at the local high school. The prosecutor gave teens an ultimatum: accept charges of child pornography or enroll in an education course designed to spell out the dangers of sexting.
adjustingto6figu

The View from all Sides - Are Public Adjusters Good or Bad? - 0 views

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    The goal of the insurance company is to settle a claim for as little money as possible. It's why insurance policies are laden with legal terms and doublespeak to the point that policyholders really have no idea what their policy does and doesn't cover. This confusion may prompt policyholders to hire a public adjuster unnecessarily. The truth is, many public adjusters don't review every detail of a policy and may even, occasionally, represent a claim that is not even covered.
Anne Bubnic

ChatRoulette, from my perspective [danah boyd] - 0 views

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    danah boyd says she's been following ChatRoulette for a while now but hasn't been comfortable talking about it publicly. For one, it's a hugely controversial site, one that is prompting yet-another moral panic about youth engagement online.
Anne Bubnic

House passes Rogers' Anti-Bullying Bill [Massachusetts] - 0 views

  • By a unanimous vote, the House of Representatives passed the Anti-Bullying Bill sponsored by Norwood state Rep. John H. Rogers to fight bullying and cyber-bullying in the schools of the Commonwealth. The legislation applies to public schools, charter schools and schools providing special education services to students for school districts.  The bill prohibits bullying at school including school-sponsored events, on school buses and at school bus stops as well as the use of electronic devices to commit cyber-bullying. The ban on bullying includes bullying or cyber-bullying that takes place outside of school if the bullying affects the school environment. 
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    A bullying/cyberbullying bill (similar to the one that passed in California in 2009) became legislation in Massachusetts this week. It requires training of teachers and students, reporting and investigation into cyberbullying incidents by school administrators if the bullying incidents that take place on campus, at school-sponsored events or bullying that affects the school environment.
Anne Bubnic

Why Don't Teens Tweet? - 0 views

  • The implication is that 11% is a small number, but if we look deeper, it turns out that Twitter has a higher concentration of teens than Facebook. You can see in the chart below that Facebook is only 9% teen, so Twitter is actually more teen than Facebook, which rightly has never been perceived as having a “teen problem.” Facebook has so many users that teens just can’t be that large a percentage of the service, by definition.
  • Nielsen also suggested that “Teens Don’t Tweet” in a report that was destined to become a trending topic on Twitter itself. Almost as quickly as it came out, a number of bloggers, including Danah Boyd, debunked the study for charting the age group 2 – 24 and yet drawing conclusions about teens, noting there are not too many 2-year-olds on Twitter.
  • As it turns out, teens actually tweet more than the general population, prompting Silicon Valley Insider to say yesterday, “Kids Don’t Hate Twitter Anymore
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    Over the last few months everyone has weighed in on the question of "Why Don't Teens Tweet" - except, it would appear, teens. We recently ran a survey of 10,000+ US teens aged 13 - 17 to see if we could add anything new to the question.
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