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thomas lloyd

Warning! First Impression is very important - 1 views

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    Here are some of the errors you might be making when reaching out to strangers. Westhill Consulting Career and Employment, Australia's reveals why they won't hire you before they even meet you. You're too casual. It is nearly always better to blunder on the side of formality, specifically when asking someone for something. It's wiser to be more polite and lead off with "Dear So and So," or "Hello WhatHisName" than "Hey, Elizabeth!" You're presumptuous. Career "experts" all over the place are at all times telling you close with a meeting proposal, but then again you have to do it correctly. Say something like "I would like to buy you a coffee or lunch sometime soon if you can spare the time. Please let me know if this is possible." Don't make it sound like complaints. Do not do this also, reach out to complete strangers on LinkedIn and ask for endorsements. You're sloppy. If you can't take five minutes to proofread your message, or even pay the energy to give care to spellcheck, you display a obvious lack of respect for the person you're contacting. There's a wavy red line that plays below your spelling errors. All you have to do is take notice in it. Always review! You're random/haven't done your research. Know what the person you're contacting actually does because you cannot ask a zookeeper for a job in a bank. Do some basic research or do not expect a teacher of Bahasa Indonesia in Jakarta would talk to you in Chinese. You're asking for something and offering nothing. The job market is not the place to beg. It's OK to ask for something. If you want help, or advice, you ought to ask for it - respectfully, from the correct person. But you need to make a motion of mutuality, like the offer to purchase lunch. What you can do is for example write an article, design something, organ
thomas lloyd

Why Candidates Fail to Make an Impression in Interviews - 1 views

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    Poor preparation: Candidates who come to an interview understanding insufficiently about the company, the industry and maybe the role are in a poor situation to match with well-prepared professionals who will devote the compressed interview time exactly putting themselves for the employer's precise requirements. Employers intend to know you are curious, energetic, resourceful and inspired and what clearer verification of that than coming completely prepared and with sharp understandings into the employer and their brand/positioning/problems/news etc. If you have prepared right you will be able to hit the ground running in the interview with answers that show how you are exceptionally placed to increase value from the get-go given the company's specific culture (maybe you are from outside the country, Indonesian from Jakarta or American from the USA), positioning, objectives, circumstances and situation. Showing a negative attitude: Many polls conducted by Westhill Consulting Career and Employment, Australia have uncovered that attitude takes a vital share in defining character and persuading the employment decision. Warning indications of bad attitudes that are positive to reject by a possible employer involve badmouthing former bosses, companies and colleagues; self-justifying or foully equivocal answers to key interview questions; or openly aggressive answers, posture and demeanor. Keep in mind people hire experienced people they consider they will actually like working with and who will extend a good optimistic atmosphere inside the organization and to exterior clients and stakeholders. Employers are highly aware that negative attitudes are very spreadable and are very different from being interested to applicants with less than an exemplary attitude regarding work, life and themselves. Absence of enthusiasm in the company: Some things can estrange an employer more than an applicant
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