Skip to main content

Home/ Groups/ UWCSEA Teachers
Keri-Lee Beasley

How to Create a Coaching Schedule {and handle your busy-ness} | Ms. Houser - 1 views

  •  
    Coaching blog by an Instructional coach.
Keri-Lee Beasley

7 Questions To Ask When Uncovering Your Personal Brand - Forbes - 1 views

  •  
    Personal Branding
Sean McHugh

Education in the Age of Globalization » Blog Archive » How Does PISA Put the ... - 1 views

  •  
    PISA, the OECD's triennial international assessment of 15 year olds in math, reading, and science, has become one of the most destructive forces in education today. It creates illusory models of excellence, romanticizes misery, glorifies educational authoritarianism, and most serious, directs the world's attention to the past instead of pointing to the future.
Keri-Lee Beasley

Infoactive - 0 views

  •  
    Make gorgeous visuals with this tool
Keri-Lee Beasley

import*io - Structured Web Data Scraping - 0 views

  •  
    Grabs data from websites into useable formats for infographics
Keri-Lee Beasley

NumberPicture - Next-level Charts. Free! - 0 views

  •  
    Infographic chart maker awesomeness
Sean McHugh

The Overprotected Kid - The Atlantic - 0 views

  • Sandseter began observing and interviewing children on playgrounds in Norway. In 2011, she published her results in a paper called “Children’s Risky Play From an Evolutionary Perspective: The Anti-Phobic Effects of Thrilling Experiences.” Children, she concluded, have a sensory need to taste danger and excitement; this doesn’t mean that what they do has to actually be dangerous, only that they feel they are taking a great risk. That scares them, but then they overcome the fear. In the paper, Sandseter identifies six kinds of risky play: (1) Exploring heights, or getting the “bird’s perspective,” as she calls it—“high enough to evoke the sensation of fear.” (2) Handling dangerous tools—using sharp scissors or knives, or heavy hammers that at first seem unmanageable but that kids learn to master. (3) Being near dangerous elements—playing near vast bodies of water, or near a fire, so kids are aware that there is danger nearby. (4) Rough-and-tumble play—wrestling, play-fighting—so kids learn to negotiate aggression and cooperation. (5) Speed—cycling or skiing at a pace that feels too fast. (6) Exploring on one’s own.
  • This last one Sandseter describes as “the most important for the children.” She told me, “When they are left alone and can take full responsibility for their actions, and the consequences of their decisions, it’s a thrilling experience.”
  • the final irony is that our close attention to safety has not in fact made a tremendous difference in the number of accidents children have.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • sometimes it seems as if children don’t get the space to grow up at all; they just become adept at mimicking the habits of adulthood. As Hart’s research shows, children used to gradually take on responsibilities, year by year. They crossed the road, went to the store; eventually some of them got small neighborhood jobs. Their pride was wrapped up in competence and independence, which grew as they tried and mastered activities they hadn’t known how to do the previous year. But these days, middle-class children, at least, skip these milestones. They spend a lot of time in the company of adults, so they can talk and think like them, but they never build up the confidence to be truly independent and self-reliant.
  •  
    Sandseter began observing and interviewing children on playgrounds in Norway. In 2011, she published her results in a paper called "Children's Risky Play From an Evolutionary Perspective: The Anti-Phobic Effects of Thrilling Experiences." Children, she concluded, have a sensory need to taste danger and excitement; this doesn't mean that what they do has to actually be dangerous, only that they feel they are taking a great risk. That scares them, but then they overcome the fear. In the paper, Sandseter identifies six kinds of risky play: (1) Exploring heights, or getting the "bird's perspective," as she calls it-"high enough to evoke the sensation of fear." (2) Handling dangerous tools-using sharp scissors or knives, or heavy hammers that at first seem unmanageable but that kids learn to master. (3) Being near dangerous elements-playing near vast bodies of water, or near a fire, so kids are aware that there is danger nearby. (4) Rough-and-tumble play-wrestling, play-fighting-so kids learn to negotiate aggression and cooperation. (5) Speed-cycling or skiing at a pace that feels too fast. (6) Exploring on one's own.
Katie Day

Journal of Emerging Investigators | JEI is a scientific journal for middle and high sch... - 0 views

  •  
    the Journal for Emerging Investigators (JEI), a publication founded by a group of Harvard grad students in 2011 that provides a forum for the work of middle school and high school students. It has the same standards as academic journals, and each submission is reviewed by grad students and academics.
Keri-Lee Beasley

ooomf Blog | Tips and other good things. - 2 views

  •  
    Fascinating article about the science behind fonts. Talks about optimum font size/spacing and line length and has great examples.
Keri-Lee Beasley

Google Fonts - 0 views

  •  
    Test out fonts then add to your collection in Google! Genius! Great for helping to show students how fonts can convey a message.
Keri-Lee Beasley

100 Free Fonts You Should Have in Your Library | Cruzine - 0 views

  •  
    A lovely collection of fonts 
1 - 20 of 2750 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page