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Keri-Lee Beasley

Chineasy by ShaoLan: Clever design that takes some of the pain out of learning Chinese. - 0 views

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    Clever design helping people learn Chinese characters.
Jeffrey Plaman

Featured Resources | ScratchEd - 0 views

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    This is a great list of resources for learning scratch for students who need challenges to extend their skills. 
Jeffrey Plaman

Programming Power? Does Learning to Code Empower Kids? | DMLcentral - 1 views

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    Programming Power? Does Learning to Code Empower Kids? | DMLcentral http://t.co/23koz2Wj5m
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    Programming Power? Does Learning to Code Empower Kids? | DMLcentral http://t.co/23koz2Wj5m
Katie Day

Before Reading or Watching Videos, Students Should Experiment First | MindShift - 1 views

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    "The study's conclusion suggests that the current model of the flipped classroom should itself be flipped upside down. The researchers advocate the "flipped flipped classroom," in which videos come after exploration and not before."
Katie Day

OMG, kids these days: Digital tools don't make students better writers | Ars Technica - 1 views

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    New Pew study finds teachers believe students are now more prone to take shortcuts. "
Sean McHugh

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift - 2 views

  • “We were amazed at how frequently they multitasked, even though they knew someone was watching,” Rosen says. “It really seems that they could not go for 15 minutes without engaging their devices,” adding, “It was kind of scary, actually.”
  • media multitasking while learning. Attending to multiple streams of information and entertainment while studying, doing homework, or even sitting in class has become common behavior among young people—so common that many of them rarely write a paper or complete a problem set any other way.
  • But evidence from psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience suggests that when students multitask while doing schoolwork, their learning is far spottier and shallower than if the work had their full attention. They understand and remember less, and they have greater difficulty transferring their learning to new contexts.
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  • Under most conditions, the brain simply cannot do two complex tasks at the same time. It can happen only when the two tasks are both very simple and when they don’t compete with each other for the same mental resources. An example would be folding laundry and listening to the weather report on the radio. That’s fine. But listening to a lecture while texting, or doing homework and being on Facebook—each of these tasks is very demanding, and each of them uses the same area of the brain, the prefrontal cortex.”
  • Young people think they can perform two challenging tasks at once, Meyer acknowledges, but “they are deluded,
  • This ability to resist the lure of technology can be consciously cultivated
  • “The good thing about this phenomenon is that it’s a relatively discrete behavior that parents actually can do something about,” she says. “It would be hard to enforce a total ban on media multitasking, but parents can draw a line when it comes to homework and studying—telling their kids, ‘This is a time when you will concentrate on just one thing.’ ”
  • Stop fretting about how much they’re on Facebook. Don’t harass them about how much they play video games. The digital native boosters are right that this is the social and emotional world in which young people live. Just make sure when they’re doing schoolwork, the cell phones are silent, the video screens are dark, and that every last window is closed but one.
Sean McHugh

Storyline Online - 0 views

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    Um. ONline stories - read aloud my Hollywood super stars!
Sean McHugh

How Free Play Can Define Kids' Success | MindShift - 0 views

  • Creativity plays an integral part of developing these seven skill sets.
  • Keeping children on rigid, academically driven schedules denies them the space for some of the real self-learning that will see them through unexpected challenges, the ones that aren’t on the test.
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    "one of the most important skills a parent can foster in children is resilience, which he says can be fostered through creativity. Ginsburg relies on the "Seven C's of Resilience" as a road map for helping students to find their inner grit.

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Sean McHugh

How to Foster Grit, Tenacity and Perseverance: An Educator's Guide | MindShift - 0 views

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    "How can we best prepare children and adolescents to thrive in the 21st century? This question is at the heart of what every educator attempts to do on a daily basis. Apart from imparting content of knowledge and facts, however, it's becoming clear that the "noncognitive competencies" known as grit, perseverance, and tenacity are just as important, if not more so, in preparing kids to be self-sufficient and successful."
Louise Phinney

Avenue4Learning - The Tool Isn't The Problem - 1 views

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    Blog post about a schools experience with ipads
Sean McHugh

Do Violent Games Lead Kids Astray? - IGN - 0 views

  • dialogue is far removed, however, from the intensely heated conflict that exists at the smaller, more personal scale. On the one hand you have the millions of Americans who play games, whether on a console or a smartphone, and have been raised in a time where such things are ubiquitous. On the other is a (generally older) population whose exposure to games has been limited to the most visible examples of the medium, including billion-dollar series like Call of Duty and notorious time sinks like FarmVille that paint a limited portrait of gaming's full range.
  • "You’re not wrong to be concerned about the time your son spends playing video games," wrote Moody. "But let me ask you this: If there were no video games here, wouldn’t there be some other stimulus that could threaten his time by diverting his attention away from, wait, what did you call it? 'What I feel are much more worthwhile and ultimately rewarding pursuits.’ 
  • fears about video games are understandable. Like anything else, they can become the focal point of unhealthy behavior all too easily, a point Moody is quick to emphasize. As Moody says again and again, though, that’s hardly the fault of video games.
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  • Video games actually encourage problem solving and memory skills in young people. "[Children] have to discover the rules of the game and how to think strategically,"
  • Even video games that can horrify with their grisly depictions of violence have benefits that individuals like ADCP are unaware of due to an unwillingness to engage the material.
  • some studies are finding that video games can help improve people’s quality of life for longer.
  • their results point to the need for more study. They don’t know for sure if it’s the games that improves mental health in seniors, or simply the mental activity they stimulate.
  • Video games are just tools, outlets for people to express themselves in as vast a variety of ways as anything else. They are still relatively new creations, and the unknown can frighten anyone, hence the uproar that’s followed games for years. The same uproar and indignation that followed rock and roll in the '50s and novels in the 19th century.
  • This is why the Violent Content Research Act of 2013 is ultimately a good thing. It will lead to, ideally, a deeper understanding of how we interact with games. For parents, children, players, academics, and everyone else with a vested interest in a gaming future, the most important thing is to maintain perspective.
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    "Video games are just tools, outlets for people to express themselves in as vast a variety of ways as anything else. They are still relatively new creations, and the unknown can frighten anyone, hence the uproar that's followed games for years. The same uproar and indignation that followed rock and roll in the '50s and novels in the 19th century.
    This is why the Violent Content Research Act of 2013 is ultimately a good thing. It will lead to, ideally, a deeper understanding of how we interact with games. For parents, children, players, academics, and everyone else with a vested interest in a gaming future, the most important thing is to maintain perspective."
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