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anonymous

Giorgio Bertini's Public Library | Diigo - 1 views

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    Recommend this Diigo Metacognition Multidisciplinary Annotated Bibliography about Learning Change http://gfbertini.wordpress.com/ ... some readings from multidisciplinary research on society, culture, critical thinking, neuroscience, cognition, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, rhizomes, emergence, self-organization, complexity, systems, networks, methods, thinkers, futures ...
anonymous

Embodied Cognition (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) - 0 views

  • Consider four evocative examples of phenomena that have motivated embodied cognitive science. We typically gesture when we speak to one another, and gesturing facilitates not just communication but language processing itself (McNeill 1992). Vision is often action-guiding, and bodily movement and the feedback it generates are more tightly integrated into at least some visual processing than has been anticipated by traditional models of vision (O'Regan and Noë 2001). There are neurons, mirror neurons, that fire not only when we undertake an action, but do so when we observe others undertaking the same actions (Rizolatti and Craighero 2004). We are often able to perform cognitive tasks, such as remembering, more effectively by using our bodies and even parts of our surrounding environments to off-load storage and simplify the nature of the cognitive processing (Donald 1991).
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    Thinking about embodied cognition in young children's dramatic play with robotic teachers and augmented reality.
anonymous

Supersizing the Mind - Hardcover - Andy Clark - Oxford University Press - 0 views

  • Drawing upon recent work in psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, artificial intelligence, robotics, human-computer systems, and beyond, Supersizing the Mind offers both a tour of the emerging cognitive landscape and a sustained argument in favor of a conception of mind that is extended rather than "brain-bound." The importance of this new perspective is profound. If our minds themselves can include aspects of our social and physical environments, then the kinds of social and physical environments we create can reconfigure our minds and our capacity for thought and reason.
anonymous

DARPA's Robot Olympics » Cyborgology - 0 views

  • Schraube’s materialized action approach combines Actor Network Theory with Critical Psychology. From the latter, Schraube uses the idea of objectification which argues that technology is always imbued with human intention. From the former, he takes the idea that technologies always act back upon humans. In short, the materialized action approach says that technologies and humans have a mutually constitutive relationship, but this relationship is lopsided. Although both humans and technologies each act upon the other, humans take the primary position. Humans construct technologies in response to human problems. They build into these technologies cultural values and intentions. Technology is the material form of human action, but one without definitive consequences.
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    See article link to Schraube's technology as materialized action approach and comments about automation of physical tasks vs automation of mental tasks.
anonymous

Augmented Revolution » Cyborgology - 0 views

  • The Egyptian resistance used web tools as well as physical space, and most importantly, they did so by looking at the intersection of both. They used the web to inform people how to behave in physical space, e.g., what to do with tear gas containers, who should stand in front of the crowds and how the crowds should move about the city. It makes little sense to argue about whether these are social media revolutions or not. Instead, we should recognize them as augmented revolutions. Only then can we debate just how and how much of a role the digital aspect played.
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    Thinking about how augmented reality impacts physical reality.
anonymous

New Media Literacies - Learning in a Participatory Culture - 0 views

  • Simulation: the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes. Being able to interpret, manipulate and create simulations can help you understand innumerable complex systems, like ecologies and computer networks – and make you better at playing video games!
  • Multitasking
  • Distributed Cognition: 
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  • Judgment: the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources. If you’re worried about your students using Wikipedia at inappropriate times and taking everything they read on the internet as gospel truth, you’re worried that they aren’t exercising good judgment. But judgment also includes knowing when sources are appropriate for your use: for instance, sometimes Wikipedia might be the appropriate resource to use.
  • Visualization - the ability to translate information into visual models and understand the information visual models are communicating. VIsualization has become a key way we cope with large data sets and make sense of the complexity of our environment.
anonymous

Digital View news articles - Museum Interactive Displays - 0 views

  • Museums are increasingly using digital video presentation to engage with visitors. Moving away from traditional VHS and DVD delivery, new dedicated digital media players offer an extremely low cost, yet highly reliable option for all types of looping content. Digital View - a specialist in the provision of these solid state digital media players - has even added a range of low cost interactive options to its range of ViewStream™ & VideoFlyer™ digital presentation tools. Everything a museum needs; from buttons, levers and motion sensors, to touch screens, RS-232 and full AMX / Crestron connectivity. Interactivity that is simple to program, simple to integrate and fast-to-the-touch - ensuring the best visitor experience.`
anonymous

Whiten (1991): Natural Theories of Mind - 0 views

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    Inspired by Will Sullivan Diigo Link added to Thoughtvectors on 27 Jun 14 Simulacra and Simulation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia en.wikipedia.org/...Simulacra_and_Simulation visualculture augmentedreality See CogSci Bibliography; CogSci Index, and CogWeb for excellent review of developmental psychology research (last updated online 2007)
Will Sullivan

The Radio as New Technology: Blessing or Curse? A 1929 Debate » - 0 views

  • Accommodated as we are to mass media, we must work to imagine the impact of commercial radio broadcasting in its early years. From the late 1800s, new electronic devices had been expanding the realm of shared human experience — people conversed on telephones, sent news through telegrams, played records on phonographs, and enjoyed films in local theaters. But until the radio, nothing offered such widely shared simultaneous mass experience. By turning on your radio set, you could listen to a jazz band, baseball game, religious service, even a president’s speech, live, along with millions of fellow listeners.
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    An excerpt from an old criticism of the radio in the 1920s. Sound familiar?
Will Sullivan

Barcode - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • A barcode is an optical machine-readable representation of data relating to the object to which it is attached. Originally barcodes systematically represented data by varying the widths and spacings of parallel lines, and may be referred to as linear or one-dimensional (1D). Later they evolved into rectangles, dots, hexagons and other geometric patterns in two dimensions (2D). Although 2D systems use a variety of symbols, they are generally referred to as barcodes as well. Barcodes originally were scanned by special optical scanners called barcode readers. Later, scanners and interpretive software became available on devices including desktop printers and smartphones.
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    Barcodes are symbols just like any other, but they can only be read by computers! They're kind of like paintings for computers.
Will Sullivan

Simulacra and Simulation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 1 views

  • "Simulacra and Simulation" breaks the sign-order into 4 stages: The first stage is a faithful image/copy, where we believe, and it may even be correct, that a sign is a "reflection of a profound reality" (pg 6), this is a good appearance, in what Baudrillard called "the sacramental order". The second stage is perversion of reality, this is where we come to believe the sign to be an unfaithful copy, which "masks and denatures" reality as an "evil appearance—it is of the order of maleficence". Here, signs and images do not faithfully reveal reality to us, but can hint at the existence of an obscure reality which the sign itself is incapable of encapsulating. The third stage masks the absence of a profound reality, where the simulacrum pretends to be a faithful copy, but it is a copy with no original. Signs and images claim to represent something real, but no representation is taking place and arbitrary images are merely suggested as things which they have no relationship to. Baudrillard calls this the "order of sorcery", a regime of semantic algebra where all human meaning is conjured artificially to appear as a reference to the (increasingly) hermetic truth. The fourth stage is pure simulation, in which the simulacrum has no relationship to any reality whatsoever. Here, signs merely reflect other signs and any claim to reality on the part of images or signs is only of the order of other such claims. This is a regime of total equivalency, where cultural products need no longer even pretend to be real in a naïve sense, because the experiences of consumers' lives are so predominantly artificial that even claims to reality are expected to be phrased in artificial, "hyperreal" terms. Any naïve pretension to reality as such is perceived as bereft of critical self-awareness, and thus as oversentimental.
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    This is a short passage from a very interesting book about Symbols in modern culture.
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