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Rozen Monroe

Victims Targeted Under Guise of Obamacare - 1 views

http://ambrociabanks.soup.io/post/331735693/Victims-Targeted-Under-Guise-of-Obamacare LAS VEGAS - What you don't know can hurt you when it comes to the hundreds of scams circulating about the Aff...

springhill home care korea reviews victims targeted under guise of obamacare

started by Rozen Monroe on 08 Aug 13 no follow-up yet
Evan Turk

Meaningful Ways of Honoring the Veterans of the Korean War - 1 views

http://www.nonprofitquarterly.org/policysocial-context/22669-meaningful-ways-of-honoring-the-veterans-of-the-korean-war.html This past weekend was the sixtieth anniversary of the signing of the K...

springhill home care korea reviews meaningful ways of honoring the veterans korean war

started by Evan Turk on 02 Aug 13 no follow-up yet
Gary Mason

Springhill Care Group | Alzheimer's as Most Feared Disease by Americans According to Poll - 1 views

  •  
    Free Alzheimer's Training Available in all 50 States to Support Family Caregivers
    Alzheimer's disease is a fatal, progressive and degenerative disease that destroys brain cells. It is the most common form of dementia. Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. Symptoms include having difficulty remembering things, making decisions and performing everyday activities. These changes can affect the way a person feels and acts. There is currently no way to stop the disease, but research is improving the way provide care and will continue to search for a cure.
    Americans fear developing Alzheimer's disease more than any other major life-threatening disease, including cancer, stroke, heart disease and diabetes according to OMAHA, Neb. - November 13, 2012 - Home Instead Senior Care®, the world's leading provider of home care services for seniors, announced new survey results.

    More than 1,200 Americans was designed to gain perspective on the most pressing concerns associated with Alzheimer's, including diagnosis and the difficulties of caring for a loved one with the disease, according to the survey of Marist Institute for Public Opinion
    .
    According to Jeff Huber, president and chief operating officer of Home Instead, Inc. "The survey confirmed what our franchise owners had been hearing from their clients and their families - the majority of Americans feel unprepared to care for a loved one diagnosed with Alzheimer's. The need for support and education for these families is critical."
    Additional survey highlights include:

    o Nearly two-thirds of Americans (63 percent) have had a personal experience with someone with Alzheimer's and/or a serious memory loss problem.

    o 61 percent of Americans feel unprepared to care for a loved one diagnosed with the disease.

    o If diagnosed with the disease, Americans most fear the inability to care for oneself, and burdening others (68 percent); followed by losing memory of life and lov
Saad Omar

Springhill Care Group: Sickle Cell Patients Rely On ER to Adult Health Care - 1 views

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    Livejournal News - Patients with sickle cell disease move from pediatric to adult health care because they now depend more on the emergency room, says researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

    Reported at the American Society of Hematology's annual meeting in Atlanta, more than 3,200 patients with sickle cell disease demonstrates that emergency room visits tripled from age 15 to age 24 this is according to the study of Medicaid data.

    According to hematologist Morey A. Blinder, MD, associate professor of medicine, "There seems to be a breakdown in medical care during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Not only emergency department usage, but hospitalizations go up during this time as well."

    Blinder further added that one possible explanation for the increased reliance on emergency care is the relative lack of adult health care providers with experience caring for sickle cell patients. Alarming similar issues are arising for other pediatric diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and hemophilia. The said illnesses were previously fatal. What is more sad about the problem is over the past few decades the number of children and teenagers are living into adulthood with these conditions increased. What makes the matters worse is there often aren't enough primary care physicians who can provide care for these adult patients.

    Many are not familiar to the understanding of the sickle cell disease. It refers to a number of inherited genetic conditions the "sickle" shape red blood cells aren't normal, they are suppose to be normally round, disk-like red blood cells. The problems with these malformed red blood cells are prone to clogging smaller blood vessels and they do not carry oxygen to the body as well as healthy cells. The condition often causes pain in places the cells block blood flow that sometimes causes more severe complications include blindness, strokes and pneumonia.

    Medical patients from five states
Krishna Singh

Springhill Group Korea: Is Home for the Aged a Better Option - 0 views

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    Home for the aged is a general term for a facility that cares for elderly people. It is not a question of where but a question of how. How is home for the aged can do good for our elderly?

    In a fast phase world like ours, finding time for fun and leisure is hard and finding time for family is harder. Sometimes we are left with no choice. We are forced to leave our elderly family members in a nursing home or more popular as home for the aged.

    There is always two sides in a story, leaving elderly family member in a caring home has advantages and disadvantages. Number of senior citizens suddenly seemed to multiply since 1950's. In 1900 the average life expectancy was forty-five, by 1950 the average life span was almost seventy years; the population has doubled but the number of people65 and over had quadrupled to become 8% of the total. In 1950's more and more population of "retirees" are supposed to get their pensions. Due to this case, extended families are seemed to be an obligation, where elderly had to stay with their sons, daughters or grandchildren.

    People then began wondering how to accommodate this burden. They started taking about nursing homes, retirement houses, or apartments where they can leave their elderly. Golden years are supposed to have a positive connotation but now the phrase developed into a different meaning. Instead of the "golden years" being now, I a one's old age golden refers to the good old days.

    Studies showed that people in developed countries are not only living longer, but also remain healthy for much of their lives, unlike in less developed countries, where the elderly tend to be plagued with serious illnesses. Causing them to live longer which means government has to support them because they are already retirees. In order to support them, one must work and working means no one to take care of the elderly.

    Elderly has a special healthcare although facilities like home for the aged are design
Springhill Care

Spain Borrowing Costs Ease, Catalonia Unhappy - 0 views

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    Springhill Care Group - Spain's borrowing costs on its 10-year government bonds fell to the lowest level since January on Thursday.

    At its latest debt auction raised 4.8 billion euros and saw strong demand from investors for the bonds maturing in three and 10 years' time.

    Madrid has been able to more easily sell its bonds at lower rates of interest since the European Central Bank announced its bond-buying plan.

    Trader Ignacio Blanco with Bankinter said: "Over the last month and a half bond interest rates are down more than two percent, since Draghi spoke at the end of July. There was strong demand in the days before the auction and today too. They were buying bonds before, they continued to buy today, and the initial operations after the auction were good."

    Many analysts have warned Spain's borrowing costs could skyrocket to unsustainable levels unless Rajoy asks for an international bailout, at which point the ECB would start buying Spanish bonds.

    The country's economic crisis is exposing deep fault lines with the wealthy, but heavily indebted, region of Catalonia calling for tax breaks.

    Catalonia, which is in northeastern Spain, generates one fifth of the country's economic output and is home to 16 percent of Spaniards.

    More than half of Catalans say they want a separate state, and hundreds of thousands marched in Barcelona last week - the biggest such show of separatist fervor.

    The upsurge in Catalan separatism is founded on a conviction that Madrid is draining the region financially.

    The central government collects most taxation payments then redistributes them to Spain's 17 self-governing regions, which run their own schools and hospitals. Each year Catalans say they pay 16 billion euros more in taxes than the regional government spends.

    The region's debts have made the Madrid government's task of balancing the budget more difficult.

    Rajoy has threatened to intervene in regions that cannot control their budgets. Catalonia is lik
Susan Easton

Seoul to Have Just Two Workers to Support One Elderly Person by 2039 - springhill care ... - 1 views

view.koreaherald.com/kh/view.php?ud=20120905001096&cpv=0 an average of two seoul citizens would have to work to support one elderly by 2039 amid the falling birth rate and rising life expectancy, ...

springhill group korea care Fraud news scam south seoul home

started by Susan Easton on 05 Oct 12 no follow-up yet
Springhill Care

Medication programme extended to more homes, home-care providers - 1 views

  •  
    On Blogger - Springhill Care Group
    A programme that gets pharmacists to help make sure nursing home residents take their medicines promptly and safely will be extended to more homes and home-care providers. It follows a successful one-year pilot at six nursing homes in the last year.

    They are St Theresa's Home, Society for the Aged Sick, Tai Pei Social Service, Sree Narayana Mission Home for the Aged Sick, Jamiyah Nursing Home and Moral Home for the Aged Sick.

    A spokesman for the Agency for Integrated Care (AIC), an entity under the Ministry of Health that oversees the long-term care of the elderly, said it would start getting in touch with other nursing homes and hoped to extend the programme to all eventually.

    For the pilot, pharmacists from Guardian Health & Beauty, Watson's Personal Care Stores, NTUC Unity Healthcare and the National Healthcare Group visited the six homes and met individual residents to sort out their medications. View full story at: http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/medication-programme-extended-more-homes-home-care-providers-20120930
  •  
    Extending the medication programme is really been a good news..thanks for the organization who support this programme..
  •  
    This is just so inspiring it made my day.
Louis Tomb

Springhill korea anti-fraud / Foursquare: Springhill Group Florida - Home Care - Southf... - 0 views

  •  
    Town Center Suite 1900 Southfield, Michigan 48075 (Town Center Suite 1900),Southfield, MI 48075
    Building

    Springhill Group look to cater to the special requirements of each person citizen and any changing circumstances that occur throughout their time living in our care. This gives families the comfort that their loved one has the support and care.

    We fully understand a need to a place that residents will be proud to call their homeis what they require most. All are built in attractive locations, nestled amongst existing communities, so our residents can easily retain their ties with their families.

    Springhill Care offers retirees the finest in clinical care, while receiving the positive aspects of living in our cozy and comfortable community.

    Email us now at info@springhillcaregroup.net
Louis Tomb

Springhill korea anti-fraud / Businesses Focus on Region's Aging Population - 0 views

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    Using a moisture sensor, a wireless system and a mobile phone, Kevin Wong, the chief executive of Ckicom Technology Ltd, explains how this new technology can alert caregivers when they should change the diapers of elderly people in nursing homes.
    As the rapid aging of Asia's population creates challenges for governments and societies, new opportunities are emerging for businesses serving the needs of the elderly and their caretakers.
    While population aging is a global phenomenon, the Asian-Pacific region is expected to see a particularly drastic demographic change over the next few decades. The number of elderly persons in the region-already home to more than half of the world's population aged 60 and over-is expected to triple to more than 1.2 billion by 2050, when one in four people in the region will be over 60 years old, according to the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
Timothy Weeper

Springhill Group Korea Region's Aging Population-BLOGGER-LIVEJOURNAL-ENEXPRESS - 1 views

  •  
    As the rapid aging of Asia's population creates challenges for governments and
    societies, new opportunities are emerging for businesses serving the needs of the
    elderly and their caretakers.
    While population aging is a global phenomenon, the Asian-Pacific region is
    expected to see a particularly drastic demographic change over the next few
    decades. The number of elderly persons in the region-already home to more
    than half of the world's population aged 60 and over-is expected to triple to
    more than 1.2 billion by 2050, when one in four people in the region will be
    over 60 years old, according to the United Nations Economic and Social
    Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
    Across Asia, large corporations and entrepreneurs in various industries are racing
    to come up with new products and services for the elderly, while health-care-
    related businesses are seeing soaring demand. Among various fields of health
    care for the elderly, nursing homes represent one of the fastest-growing sectors.
    In Japan, companies that previously had little to do with the issue of aging have
    jumped on the bandwagon. In 2005, Watami Co., which operates Japanese-
    style izakaya pubs serving food and drinks, entered a new business of running
    nursing homes. In the most recent fiscal year, the nursing business was more
    profitable than its izakaya business. Demand for Watami's new business is robust
    because Japan's population is the world's grayest, according to a 2009 United
    Nation report, with nearly 30% aged 60 or older.
    Other parts of Asia, such as China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea and
    Singapore, are also anticipating a surge in the percentage of elderly citizens. In
    China, people over the age of 60 now account for 13.3% of the country's
    population of 1.34 billion, up from 10.3% in 2000, according to the National
    Bureau of Statistics, and the aging trend is expected to accelerate.
    In January, China's state-run Xinhua news agency wrote about challenges facing
    nursing ho
  •  
    It's my pleasure to find this amazing website who provides mostly unseen information about every single topic which is i really like it.
Timothy Weeper

Springhill Group Korea Region's Aging Population-BLOGGER-LIVEJOURNAL-ENEXPRESS - 1 views

  •  
    In USA TODAY's article "The underlying duel of 2012: Seniors vs. Millennials,"
    GOP volunteer Immo Sulyok is quoted saying about Election Day: "I'll be there,
    or I'll be dead." As will I, but my vote will be for President Obama ("A defining
    gap: Seniors for Romney, Millennials for Obama")
    I believe that our major concern should be educating our young. It is
    unbelievably arrogant for seniors like me to worry about only our welfare,
    finances and health. We had our day in the sun. The future generation is being
    short-changed by cuts in education spending and the increasing cost of higher
    education. We are witnessing the dumbing-down of America.
    There is also so much misinformation floating around about the Affordable Care
    Act and so much we mere citizens do not understand. Many rely on radio or TV
    talk-show hosts to teach us, and unfortunately, the hosts "teach" their opinions.
    Perhaps we should still think for ourselves.
    Joan LaRose; San Diego
    Older voters remember
    There is a different sense of history that divides Millennials and those 65 and
    older. Older voters remember the Cuban missile crisis, the Cold War and the hot
    Korean War and Vietnam conflict.
    Seniors served and sacrificed in Korea and Vietnam to defend the free world
    against communism. They have seen what communism wrought in Eastern
    Europe and Asia.
    This brave generation will vote in droves for Mitt Romney to prevent President
    Obama from transforming a free America into a socialist or communist one.
    Paul Hoylen Jr.; Deming, N.M.
    Elderly rely on entitlements
    The great majority of older Americans are expected to vote for Mitt Romney,
    the Republican nominee for president, in the upcoming election. Ironically,
    most of these senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security and Medicare for
    survival. Both of these programs were enacted by Democratic presidents and
    Congresses controlled by Democrats! What are these seniors thinking?
    Bob Hamlett; Nashville
    GOP plan causes concerns
    While I am 65
  •  
    A perfect info source. Thanks for taking the time to discuss this, I feel strongly about it and love learning more on this topic.
Rich Parker

Springhill Group Korea Next generation-BLOGGER-LIVEJOURNAL - 1 views

  •  
    In USA TODAY's article "The underlying duel of 2012: Seniors vs. Millennials,"
    GOP volunteer Immo Sulyok is quoted saying about Election Day: "I'll be there,
    or I'll be dead." As will I, but my vote will be for President Obama ("A defining
    gap: Seniors for Romney, Millennials for Obama")
    I believe that our major concern should be educating our young. It is
    unbelievably arrogant for seniors like me to worry about only our welfare,
    finances and health. We had our day in the sun. The future generation is being
    short-changed by cuts in education spending and the increasing cost of higher
    education. We are witnessing the dumbing-down of America.
    There is also so much misinformation floating around about the Affordable Care
    Act and so much we mere citizens do not understand. Many rely on radio or TV
    talk-show hosts to teach us, and unfortunately, the hosts "teach" their opinions.
    Perhaps we should still think for ourselves.
    Joan LaRose; San Diego
    Older voters remember
    There is a different sense of history that divides Millennials and those 65 and
    older. Older voters remember the Cuban missile crisis, the Cold War and the hot
    Korean War and Vietnam conflict.
    Seniors served and sacrificed in Korea and Vietnam to defend the free world
    against communism. They have seen what communism wrought in Eastern
    Europe and Asia.
    This brave generation will vote in droves for Mitt Romney to prevent President
    Obama from transforming a free America into a socialist or communist one.
    Paul Hoylen Jr.; Deming, N.M.
    Elderly rely on entitlements
    The great majority of older Americans are expected to vote for Mitt Romney,
    the Republican nominee for president, in the upcoming election. Ironically,
    most of these senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security and Medicare for
    survival. Both of these programs were enacted by Democratic presidents and
    Congresses controlled by Democrats! What are these seniors thinking?
    Bob Hamlett; Nashville
    GOP plan causes concerns
    While I am 65
  •  
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Rich Parker

Springhill Group Korea Region's Aging Population-BLOGGER-LIVEJOURNAL - 1 views

  •  
    As the rapid aging of Asia's population creates challenges for governments and
    societies, new opportunities are emerging for businesses serving the needs of the
    elderly and their caretakers.
    While population aging is a global phenomenon, the Asian-Pacific region is
    expected to see a particularly drastic demographic change over the next few
    decades. The number of elderly persons in the region-already home to more
    than half of the world's population aged 60 and over-is expected to triple to
    more than 1.2 billion by 2050, when one in four people in the region will be
    over 60 years old, according to the United Nations Economic and Social
    Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
    Across Asia, large corporations and entrepreneurs in various industries are racing
    to come up with new products and services for the elderly, while health-care-
    related businesses are seeing soaring demand. Among various fields of health
    care for the elderly, nursing homes represent one of the fastest-growing sectors.
    In Japan, companies that previously had little to do with the issue of aging have
    jumped on the bandwagon. In 2005, Watami Co., which operates Japanese-
    style izakaya pubs serving food and drinks, entered a new business of running
    nursing homes. In the most recent fiscal year, the nursing business was more
    profitable than its izakaya business. Demand for Watami's new business is robust
    because Japan's population is the world's grayest, according to a 2009 United
    Nation report, with nearly 30% aged 60 or older.
    Other parts of Asia, such as China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea and
    Singapore, are also anticipating a surge in the percentage of elderly citizens. In
    China, people over the age of 60 now account for 13.3% of the country's
    population of 1.34 billion, up from 10.3% in 2000, according to the National
    Bureau of Statistics, and the aging trend is expected to accelerate.
    In January, China's state-run Xinhua news agency wrote about challenges facing
    nursing ho
  •  
    This is the proper weblog for anybody who needs to search out out about this topic.
Ranny Stunning

SEOUL TO HAVE JUST TWO WORKERS TO SUPPORT ONE ELDERLY PERSON BY 2039 - 0 views

  •  
    An average of two Seoul citizens would have to work to support one elderly by 2039 amid the falling birth rate and rising life expectancy, statistics showed Wednesday.

    Statistics data from the Seoul Metropolitan Government predicts that in 27 years, the working-age population between 15 and 64 would drop 26 percent to 5.99 million and senior citizens aged 65 and over are expected to grow 172 percent to 2.95 million.

    Currently an average of 7.4 working people support each senior citizen.

    The demographic change is feared to squeeze the city's workforce, threatening growth and pension systems.

    The data based on a survey by the Statistics Korea also indicated that the number of youth aged 1 to 14 is forecast to decrease by 25 percent to 1.03 million.
Floyd Filbert

Springhill Group Korea Next generation-BLOGGER - 2 views

  •  
    In USA TODAY's article "The underlying duel of 2012: Seniors vs. Millennials,"
    GOP volunteer Immo Sulyok is quoted saying about Election Day: "I'll be there,
    or I'll be dead." As will I, but my vote will be for President Obama ("A defining
    gap: Seniors for Romney, Millennials for Obama")
    I believe that our major concern should be educating our young. It is
    unbelievably arrogant for seniors like me to worry about only our welfare,
    finances and health. We had our day in the sun. The future generation is being
    short-changed by cuts in education spending and the increasing cost of higher
    education. We are witnessing the dumbing-down of America.
    There is also so much misinformation floating around about the Affordable Care
    Act and so much we mere citizens do not understand. Many rely on radio or TV
    talk-show hosts to teach us, and unfortunately, the hosts "teach" their opinions.
    Perhaps we should still think for ourselves.
    Joan LaRose; San Diego
    Older voters remember
    There is a different sense of history that divides Millennials and those 65 and
    older. Older voters remember the Cuban missile crisis, the Cold War and the hot
    Korean War and Vietnam conflict.
    Seniors served and sacrificed in Korea and Vietnam to defend the free world
    against communism. They have seen what communism wrought in Eastern
    Europe and Asia.
    This brave generation will vote in droves for Mitt Romney to prevent President
    Obama from transforming a free America into a socialist or communist one.
    Paul Hoylen Jr.; Deming, N.M.
    Elderly rely on entitlements
    The great majority of older Americans are expected to vote for Mitt Romney,
    the Republican nominee for president, in the upcoming election. Ironically,
    most of these senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security and Medicare for
    survival. Both of these programs were enacted by Democratic presidents and
    Congresses controlled by Democrats! What are these seniors thinking?
    Bob Hamlett; Nashville
    GOP plan causes concerns
    While I am 65
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Also, I've shared your website in my social networks!
  •  
    In USA TODAY's article "The underlying duel of 2012: Seniors vs. Millennials,"
    GOP volunteer Immo Sulyok is quoted saying about Election Day: "I'll be there,
    or I'll be dead." As will I, but my vote will be for President Obama ("A defining
    gap: Seniors for Romney, Millennials for Obama")
    I believe that our major concern should be educating our young. It is
    unbelievably arrogant for seniors like me to worry about only our welfare,
    finances and health. We had our day in the sun. The future generation is being
    short-changed by cuts in education spending and the increasing cost of higher
    education. We are witnessing the dumbing-down of America.
    There is also so much misinformation floating around about the Affordable Care
    Act and so much we mere citizens do not understand. Many rely on radio or TV
    talk-show hosts to teach us, and unfortunately, the hosts "teach" their opinions.
    Perhaps we should still think for ourselves.
    Joan LaRose; San Diego
    Older voters remember
    There is a different sense of history that divides Millennials and those 65 and
    older. Older voters remember the Cuban missile crisis, the Cold War and the hot
    Korean War and Vietnam conflict.
    Seniors served and sacrificed in Korea and Vietnam to defend the free world
    against communism. They have seen what communism wrought in Eastern
    Europe and Asia.
    This brave generation will vote in droves for Mitt Romney to prevent President
    Obama from transforming a free America into a socialist or communist one.
    Paul Hoylen Jr.; Deming, N.M.
    Elderly rely on entitlements
    The great majority of older Americans are expected to vote for Mitt Romney,
    the Republican nominee for president, in the upcoming election. Ironically,
    most of these senior citizens depend heavily on Social Security and Medicare for
    survival. Both of these programs were enacted by Democratic presidents and
    Congresses controlled by Democrats! What are these seniors thinking?
    Bob Hamlett; Nashville
    GOP plan causes concerns
    While I am 65
  •  
    You must be very astute at research and writing. This shows up in your original and unique content. I agree with your primary points on this topic. This content should be seen by more readers
Floyd Filbert

Springhill Group Korea Region's Aging Population-BLOGGER - 2 views

  •  
    As the rapid aging of Asia's population creates challenges for governments and
    societies, new opportunities are emerging for businesses serving the needs of the
    elderly and their caretakers.
    While population aging is a global phenomenon, the Asian-Pacific region is
    expected to see a particularly drastic demographic change over the next few
    decades. The number of elderly persons in the region-already home to more
    than half of the world's population aged 60 and over-is expected to triple to
    more than 1.2 billion by 2050, when one in four people in the region will be
    over 60 years old, according to the United Nations Economic and Social
    Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    This is really interesting, You are a very skilled blogger.
  •  
    As the rapid aging of Asia's population creates challenges for governments and
    societies, new opportunities are emerging for businesses serving the needs of the
    elderly and their caretakers.
    While population aging is a global phenomenon, the Asian-Pacific region is
    expected to see a particularly drastic demographic change over the next few
    decades. The number of elderly persons in the region-already home to more
    than half of the world's population aged 60 and over-is expected to triple to
    more than 1.2 billion by 2050, when one in four people in the region will be
    over 60 years old, according to the United Nations Economic and Social
    Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
    Across Asia, large corporations and entrepreneurs in various industries are racing
    to come up with new products and services for the elderly, while health-care-
    related businesses are seeing soaring demand. Among various fields of health
    care for the elderly, nursing homes represent one of the fastest-growing sectors.
    In Japan, companies that previously had little to do with the issue of aging have
    jumped on the bandwagon. In 2005, Watami Co., which operates Japanese-
    style izakaya pubs serving food and drinks, entered a new business of running
    nursing homes. In the most recent fiscal year, the nursing business was more
    profitable than its izakaya business. Demand for Watami's new business is robust
    because Japan's population is the world's grayest, according to a 2009 United
    Nation report, with nearly 30% aged 60 or older.
    Other parts of Asia, such as China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, South Korea and
    Singapore, are also anticipating a surge in the percentage of elderly citizens. In
    China, people over the age of 60 now account for 13.3% of the country's
    population of 1.34 billion, up from 10.3% in 2000, according to the National
    Bureau of Statistics, and the aging trend is expected to accelerate.
    In January, China's state-run Xinhua news agency wrote about challenges facing
    nursing ho
  •  
    You can definitely see your enthusiasm in the work you write. The world hopes for more passionate writers like you who are not afraid to say how they believe. Always go after your heart.
Willow Ranche

China-US Standoff over Dissident Chen - connotea - tumblr - 0 views

  •  
    The decision of US to let the blind human rights activist Chen Guangcheng return into China's fold following his escape from authorities is straining ties between the two countries as diplomatic dialogues opened in Beijing. The 40-year old Chen who is now considered a dissident became an international human rights inspiration to many Chinese after earning the ire of the local government for exposing forced abortions in line with the country's one-child policy. The self-taught lawyer took to the US embassy after his escape, apparently to ask for help but was eventually ushered into the Beijing Hospital.
Willow Ranche

Springhill korea anti-fraud / Obama seeks to widen support base with Florida seniors, H... - 0 views

  •  
    KISSIMMEE, Fla. - Kicking off a two-day Sunshine State barnstorm Saturday, President Barack Obama tapped into key parts of what he hopes will be a winning Florida coalition similar to but larger than the one he assembled in 2008.

    At stops in Seminole and Kissimmee, Fla., the president, who won the Sunshine State by just 50.9 percent in 2008, targeted the votes of senior citizens, warning that their Medicare benefits would be harmed by a plan put forward by his Republican opponents Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan.

    "I want you to know, AARP, I would never turn Medicare into a voucher," Obama said at a civic center here, making an explicit play for members of the 50-and-up club. "I believe no American should ever have to spend their golden years at the mercy of insurance companies."
Sandy Hayek

China-US Standoff over Dissident Chen - blogger - 0 views

  •  
    The decision of US to let the blind human rights activist Chen Guangcheng return into China's fold following his escape from authorities is straining ties between the two countries as diplomatic dialogues opened in Beijing.

    The 40-year old Chen who is now considered a dissident became an international human rights inspiration to many Chinese after earning the ire of the local government for exposing forced abortions in line with the country's one-child policy. The self-taught lawyer took to the US embassy after his escape, apparently to ask for help but was eventually ushered into the Beijing Hospital.
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