Skip to main content

Home/ ITGSonline/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by dr tech

Contents contributed and discussions participated by dr tech

1More

Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities | WIRED - 0 views

  •  
    "My personal coding projects have presented similarly thorny ethical questions. Should I write a computer program that will download the communications of thousands of teenagers suffering from eating disorders posted on an anorexia advice website? Write a program to post anonymous, suicidal messages on hundreds of college forums to see which colleges offer the most support? My answer to these questions, incidentally, was "no". But I considered it. And the glory and peril of computers is that they magnify the impact of your whims: an impulse becomes a program that can hurt thousands of people."
1More

What if we're living in a computer simulation? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

  •  
    "If we assume that these developments continue, and with them our interest in creating simulations of the world, then at some point in the future - 1,000 years, 100,000 years - it's reasonable to assume that the difference between reality and simulation will become indistinguishable. At which point it will mean we will have created simulated beings with their own consciousness.

    Advertisement

    But if that is the inevitable outcome of continued technological advancement, unless nuclear war or some other catastrophe intervenes, then it's quite possible - some would say an overwhelming certainty - that it's already happened, and we are the ancestor simulations created by an advanced post-human civilisation."
1More

Google Chrome: Phishing Scam 'Practically Impossible to Spot' | Fortune.com - 0 views

  •  
    "Indeed, this scam is far subtler. It works like this: fraudsters are able to register domains with characters plucked from various alphabets other than the default Latin script. When displayed, it's all but impossible to tell apart a Greek "O" from a Cyrillic "O" from a Latin "O," for instance."
1More

Robotic parcel sorting facility in China / Boing Boing - 0 views

  •  
    "Chinese delivery firm is moving to embrace automation.Chinese delivery firm is moving to embrace automation.

    Orange robots at the company's sorting stations are able to identify the destination of a package through a code-scan, virtually eliminating sorting mistakes.

    Shentong's army of robots can sort up to 200,000 packages a day, and are self-charging, meaning they are operational 24/7."
1More

Vast majority of Americans reject mass surveillance to thwart terrorist attacks / Boing... - 0 views

  •  
    "75% 75% surveyed by Ipsos/Reuters said, "they would not let investigators tap into their Internet activity to help the U.S. combat domestic terrorism"(up from 67% in 20"
1More

Backdoor access to WhatsApp? Rudd's call suggests a hazy grasp of encryption | Technolo... - 0 views

  •  
    "That's the crux of the problem. While you can legislate to only give state agencies access to terrorists' communications, and with proper oversight and authorisation, you cannot actually build encryption that works like that. If you put a backdoor in, it's there not just for security services to exploit, but for cyber-criminals, oppressive regimes and anyone else."
1More

The Era of Ownership Is Ending - 0 views

  •  
    "Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) is a model for traffic without ownership. You pay a monthly fee for it, like with Spotify, tell the app where you are going and get instant access to taxis, Ubers, buses, and so on. Everything is available on-demand and ownership is no longer needed."
1More

Google reduces JPEG file size by 35% | Ars Technica UK - 0 views

  •  
    "Google has developed and open-sourced a new JPEG algorithm that reduces file size by about 35 percent-or alternatively, image quality can be significantly improved while keeping file size constant. Importantly, and unlike some of its other efforts in image compression (WebP, WebM), Google's new JPEGs are completely compatible with existing browsers, devices, photo editing apps, and the JPEG standard."
1More

How the internet found a better way than illegible squiggles to prove you're not a robo... - 0 views

  •  
    "The company has revealed the latest evolution of the Captcha (short, sort of, for Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart), which aims to do away with any interruption at all: the new, "invisible reCaptcha" aims to tell whether a given visitor is a robot or not purely by analysing their browsing behaviour. Barring a short wait while the system does its job, a typical human visitor shouldn't have to do anything else to prove they're not a robot."
1More

Tim Berners-Lee calls for tighter regulation of online political advertising | Technolo... - 0 views

  •  
    "The 61-year-old British computer scientist described how political advertising has become a sophisticated and targeted industry, drawing on enormous pools of personal data on Facebook and Google. This means that campaigns create precisely targeted ads for individuals - as many as 50,000 variations each day on Facebook during the 2016 US election, he said."
1More

WikiLeaks publishes 'biggest ever leak of secret CIA documents' | Media | The Guardian - 0 views

  •  
    "The thousands of leaked documents focus mainly on techniques for hacking and reveal how the CIA cooperated with British intelligence to engineer a way to compromise smart televisions and turn them into improvised surveillance devices."
1More

When Bad Code Caused Disaster: 10 Worst Programming Mistakes in History - 0 views

  •  
    "Plus, programming can teach valuable life lessons. However, in its storied past, coding wrought destruction as well. Instances of a little bit of bad code caused disaster on a major level. The following are 10 of the worst programming mistakes in history."
1More

AI learns to write its own code by stealing from other programs | New Scientist - 0 views

  •  
    "DeepCoder uses a technique called program synthesis: creating new programs by piecing together lines of code taken from existing software - just like a programmer might. Given a list of inputs and outputs for each code fragment, DeepCoder learned which pieces of code were needed to achieve the desired result overall.

    "It could allow non-coders to simply describe an idea for a program and let the system build it""
1More

Internet-connected teddy bear leaked kids' data online / Boing Boing - 0 views

  •  
    "Security researcher Troy Hunt reports that the snuggly spies, from Spiral Toys, Security researcher Troy Hunt reports that the snuggly spies, from Spiral Toys, "represents the nexus" of the problem with internet-connected appliances and toys: children being recorded, data being leaked, and the technical possibility of surreptitious access to children through networked toys. "The best way to understand what these guys do is to simply watch the video [advertisement for the toy].""
1More

Study reveals bot-on-bot editing wars raging on Wikipedia's pages | Technology | The Gu... - 0 views

  •  
    ""The fights between bots can be far more persistent than the ones we see between people," said Taha Yasseri, who worked on the study at the Oxford Internet Institute. "Humans usually cool down after a few days, but the bots might continue for years.""
1More

Robot monitors in homes of elderly people can predict falls, says study | Technology | ... - 0 views

  •  
    "The study found that when a person's gait-speed dropped by 5cm/second within a week, this was a sign that they were at increased risk of a fall - in fact, 86% had a fall within three weeks when such a drop in walking speed was observed. By contrast, the elderly residents who had no change in walking speed had a background probability of falling of 19.5%."
1More

Driverless trucks: economic tsunami may swallow one of most common US jobs | Technology... - 0 views

  •  
    "It seems highly likely that competition between the various companies developing these technologies will produce practical, self-driving trucks within the next five to 10 years. And once the technology is proven, the incentive to adopt it will be powerful: in the US alone, large trucks are involved in about 350,000 crashes a year, resulting in nearly 4,000 fatalities. Virtually all of these incidents can be traced to human error. The potential savings in lives, property damage and exposure to liability will eventually become irresistible.

    There's only one problem: truck driving is one of the most common occupations in the US. "
1 - 20 of 1478 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page