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Ideas to Improve Imaginations | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Commu... - 5 views

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    Includes ten tips to help encourage children's imaginations
Deron Durflinger

Niall Ferguson: How American Civilization Can Avoid Collapse - The Daily Beast - 4 views

  • “killer applications
  • Competition
  • The Scientific Revolution
  • ...29 more annotations...
  • Modern Medicine
  • The Consumer Society
  • The Work Ethic
  • The Rule of Law and Representative Government.
  • these killer apps were essentially monopolized by Europeans and their cousins who settled in North America and Australasia
  • the great divergence
  • They also grew more powerful
  • 20th century, just a dozen Western empires—-including the United States—controlled 58 percent of the world’s land surface and population, and a staggering 74 percent of the global economy.
  • tendency of Western societies to delete their own killer apps.
  • But there is a second, more insidious cause of the “great reconvergence,” which I do deplore—and that is the
  • Ask yourself: who’s got the work ethic now? The average South Korean works about 39 percent more hours per week than the average American. The school year in South Korea is 220 days long, compared with 180 days here. And you don’t have to spend too long at any major U.S. university to know which students really drive themselves: the Asians and Asian-Americans
  • Yet life expectancy in the U.S. has risen from 70 to 78 in the past 50 years, compared with leaps from 68 to 83 in Japan and from 43 to 73 in China.
  • On no fewer than 15 of 16 different issues relating to property rights and governance, the United States fares worse than Hong Kong. Indeed, the U.S. makes the global top 20 in only one area: investor protection
  • The future belongs not to them but to today’s teenagers
  • The latest data on “mathematical literacy” reveal that the gap between the world leaders—the students of Shanghai and Singapore—and their American counterparts is now as big as the gap between U.S. kids and teenagers in Albania and Tunisia.
  • Yet statistics from the World Intellectual Property Organization show that already more patents originate in Japan than in the U.S., that South Korea overtook Germany to take third place in 2005, and that China is poised to overtake Germany too
  • the United States’ average competitiveness score has fallen from 5.82 to 5.43, one of the steepest declines among developed economies. China’s score, meanwhile, has leapt up from 4.29 to 4.90.
  • Perhaps more disturbing is the decline of meaningful competition at home, as the social mobility of the postwar era has given way to an extraordinary social polarization. You don’t have to be an Occupy Wall Street leftist to believe that the American super-rich elite—the 1 percent that collects 20 percent of the income—has become dangerously divorced from the rest of society, especially from the underclass at the bottom of the income distribution.
  • Far more than in Europe, most Americans remain instinctively loyal to the killer applications of Western ascendancy, from competition all the way through to the work ethic. They know the country has the right software. They just can’t understand why it’s running so damn slowly.
  • What we need to do is to delete the viruses that have crept into our system: the anticompetitive quasi monopolies that blight everything from banking to public education; the politically correct pseudosciences and soft subjects that deflect good students away from hard science; the lobbyists who subvert the rule of law for the sake of the special interests they represent—to say nothing of our crazily dysfunctional system of health care, our overleveraged personal finances, and our newfound unemployment ethic
  • And finally we need to reboot our whole system.
  • If what we are risking is not decline but downright collapse, then the time frame may be even tighter than one election cycle
  • Western Civilization's Killer Apps

  • COMPETITION
  • THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION
  • THE RULE OF LAW
  • MODERN MEDICINE
  • THE CONSUMER SOCIETY
  • THE WORK ETHIC
David Wetzel

How to Encourage Critical Thinking in Science and Math | Teaching Science and Math - 22 views

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    Encouraging students to use critical thinking is more than an extension activity in science and math lessons, it is the basis of true learning.

    Teaching students how to think critically helps them move beyond basic comprehension and rote memorization. They shift to a new level of increased awareness when calculating, analyzing, problem solving, and evaluating.
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    Truly love your list of extended queries to extend our queries thanks David.
Kelly Faulkner

Presentation Skills for Teachers - 35 views

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    Great presentation on keeping our teaching presentations simply, appealing to our students, and to the point.
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    a handy reminder on visually presenting material
Patricia Cone

Adult Basic Skills Resource Centre for students and tutors. Home Page - 7 views

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    There are incredible resources connected to this site.
David Wetzel

What is the Value of Vocational or Technical Education? - 10 views

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    A shortage of skilled workers in today's workforce is attributed by many employers to the lack of satisfactory education beyond high school.

David Wetzel

Modeling the Composition of Earth's Atmosphere: The Layer of Gases Surrounding Planet E... - 6 views

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    This is a hands-on, minds-on approach to provide students with a concrete model of the earth's atmosphere to visualize the gases which comprise the air they breath.

David Wetzel

Investigating the Impact of Artificial Reefs: Problem-Based Learning Study of Human Inf... - 4 views

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    Students make connections with many science concepts and communicate their recommendations to officials and organizations regarding the future of artificial reefs.

David Wetzel

Understanding Scientific Inquiry: Inquiry Involves the Use of Critical Thinking to Unde... - 7 views

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    Scientific inquiry causes students to use higher order thinking skills and learn science from a minds-on approach. Inquiry's foundation originates with John Dewey. In Dewey's book Democracy in Education (1916), he indicates that education begins with the curiosity of learners. Student curiosity and involvement in scientific inquiry moves them beyond passive learning to higher order thinking.

Megan Black

Coping Skills for Kids - 8 views

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    This site provides resources including checklists for students with conflict and/or coping issues that affect learning in the classroom. Brain Based.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Reasons Why Adult Education is Crucial Beyond High School - 7 views

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    Better employment opportunities and personal development are the leading successes many adults seek when considering enrollment in continuing education.
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