Skip to main content

Home/ educators/ Group items tagged philosophy

Rss Feed Group items tagged

C CC

UKEd Mag: February - Issue 02 | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Commu... - 1 views

  •  
    Tom Bigglestone, who explores the benefits of Philosophy for Children (P4C). Chris Healey, who write about homework in the digital Age. John Pearce, advocates that teachers pledge a pedagogical oath. James Abela gives us a global perspective, writing about his experience in Thailand. Andy Knill waves the flag for the SOLO Taxonomy. UKEdChat Exclusive feature asked teachers what jobs they do if quit the profession. Martin Burrett tells of various highlights observed at BETT this year. Sharon Jones debates how debating can benefit pupils. David Moody shares some Stickmen without Arms! Tina Watson explains how she supports pupils to fill the blank pages. Leon Cych gives tips on how to produce professional video and audio with pupils. We review the book "The Philosophy Shop", edited by Peter Worley.
Martin Burrett

Thought Questions - Asking the right questions is the answer. - 14 views

  •  
    This site contains hundreds of fascinating images with thought-provoking questions. These are a great resource for class discussions and philosophy. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/PSHE%2C+RE%2C+Citizenship%2C+Geography+%26+Environmental
Martin Burrett

365 things to make you go 'hmmm...' - 30 views

  •  
    A fascinating site with thought provoking questions specifically for teachers and students. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/Cross+Curricular
Ed Webb

Half an Hour: Being a Philosopher - 7 views

  •  
    Not just of relevance to philosophers. This is how the seminar process should work.
Martin Burrett

Thunks - Get Thunking - 10 views

  •  
    This site has been a wonderful source of discussion ideas in my class, especially in philosophy sessions. This site has an archive going back to 2007 of over 1,000 fabulous question that will get your class (and you) thinking and discussing. You can even submit your own brain bouncing questions to the site. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/PSHE%2C+RE%2C+Citizenship%2C+Geography+%26+Environmental
Mireille Jansma

LOGICOMIX - Homepage - 6 views

  •  
    Totally cool: a comic on philosophy (or more specific on logic and Bertand Russell).
Dave Truss

Edge In Frankfurt: THE AGE OF THE INFORMAVORE- A Talk with Frank Schirrmacher - 3 views

  •  
    thinking itself somehow leaves the brain and uses a platform outside of the human body. And that, of course, is the Internet and it's the cloud. Very soon we will have the brain in the cloud. And the raises the question about the importance of thoughts. For centuries, what was important for me was decided in my brain. But now, apparently, it will be decided somewhere else.
Ed Webb

C. Wright Mills on blogging | Savage Minds - 0 views

  • On Intellectual Craftmanship. I was amazed how clearly the reasons why scholars blog were laid out in the opening paragraphs. In what follows I have changed none of Mills’s original language except for replaced ‘journal’ and ‘file’ with ‘website’ and ‘blog’. Clearly Mills didn’t envision the files he advocates as public documents, but other than that the parallels are uncanny
Walter Antoniotti

Education Internet Library - 0 views

  •  
    A collection of free Internet materials designed for help students studying to become teachers, new teachers, and experienced teachers with the art of teaching.
Felix Gryffeth

In Tough Times, the Humanities Must Justify Their Worth - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • The study of the humanities evolved during the 20th century “to focus almost entirely on personal intellectual development,” said Richard M. Freeland, the Massachusetts commissioner of higher education. “But what we haven’t paid a lot of attention to is how students can put those abilities effectively to use in the world. We’ve created a disjunction between the liberal arts and sciences and our role as citizens and professionals.”Mr. Freeland is part of what he calls a revolutionary movement to close the “chasm in higher education between the liberal arts and sciences and professional programs.” The Association of American Colleges and Universities recently issued a report arguing the humanities should abandon the “old Ivory Tower view of liberal education” and instead emphasize its practical and economic value.
  • Derek Bok, a former president of Harvard and the author of several books on higher education, argues, “The humanities has a lot to contribute to the preparation of students for their vocational lives.” He said he was referring not only to writing and analytical skills but also to the type of ethical issues raised by new technology like stem-cell research. But he added: “There’s a lot more to a liberal education than improving the economy. I think that is one of the worst mistakes that policy makers often make — not being able to see beyond that.” Anthony T. Kronman, a professor of law at Yale and the author of “Education’s End: Why Our Colleges and Universities Have Given Up on the Meaning of Life,” goes further. Summing up the benefits of exploring what’s called “a life worth living” in a consumable sound bite is not easy, Mr. Kronman said. But “the need for my older view of the humanities is, if anything, more urgent today,” he added, referring to the widespread indictment of greed, irresponsibility and fraud that led to the financial meltdown. In his view this is the time to re-examine “what we care about and what we value,” a problem the humanities “are extremely well-equipped to address.”
Dave Truss

Statement of Educational Philosophy « The Reflective Teacher - 0 views

  •  
    The metaphors of education systems speak volumes about what each system ultimately achieves. Ask any student to compare education or school to something completely different, and you'll likely get a list that looks like this: "School is a prison," "School is hell," "School is a babysitter," or "School is a machine." Sadly, many schools are run quite like this last example-students enter the machine, are shuffled through a number of arbitrary gears, are forcefully bent to fit those gears, move according to bells, and leave the machine knowing they'll be back the next day to repeat the process until they become the desired product of the machine.
Art Gelwicks

Drape's Takes: A Refreshing Look At Networked Learning - 0 views

  • It is time to toss out the “blog, wiki, podcast” mantra. This is bigger than tools isolated for singular purpose. If we keep pushing the tools into categories, new users will continue to only use the tools for those purposes. We should be twisting, stretching and breaking these tools, not neatly packaging content with them.
  • Networked learners are more confident than individual learners in questioning authority, discovering alternative realities and resolving critical concerns through thoughtful inquiry.
1 - 20 of 21 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page