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Adam Babcock

If Romeo and Juliet had mobile phones | Networked - 13 views

    • Adam Babcock
       
      Yeah... but "wherefore" translates to "why" in our contemporary language...
  • would have allowed Romeo and Juliet to move around, liberated from locale and parental surveillance. They would have been less worried about their families when they were figuring out where to meet. At the same time, their parents would have felt reassured because they could call their children and ask where they were and what they were doing. But, would Romeo and Juliet have told the truth? A location-aware app would also have been useful for parents in tracking them. Or they might have prowled friends’ Facebook updates or photo albums for clues.
  • Romeo and Juliet could find each other now because mobility means accessibility and availability. They’d be on each other’s top-five speed dial. And they would probably have had a location-aware app that that showed exactly where each other were: no wandering the streets of Verona looking for each other.
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  • Public spaces have become more silent, as people concentrate on their text messages, while downwardly-peering texters have limited eye contact.
  • Imagine Romeo making plans to meet Juliet in the park, but his father calls to say that he has to come home immediately. At least, the mobile connection would have allowed Romeo to alert Juliet to his role conflict and possible absence.
  • As long as they talked or texted in private, neither the Montagues nor the Capulets would know – unless, of course, they snuck peeks at the list of previous calls and texts on the phones. Instead of a phone ringing in a home—where all would hear it and possibly become part of the conversation—internet communication and mobile communication are usually exchanges between two individuals.
  • Mobile contact has become multigenerational, as teens—and even children—are increasingly getting their own mobile phones. This affords people of all ages opportunities to become more autonomous agents.
  • As they grew up, Romeo and Juliet had gotten past their childhoods of being household and neighborhood bound.  They made contact by encounters in public places. Teens still do that—the shopping mall is the new agora—but their mobile phones also afford continuous contact with their homes and distant friends.
  • If they are right, Romeo and Juliet might never look up from their mobile phones to see each other. Or, would the course of true love have led them away from their screens and into each other’s arms?
  • The story of Romeo and Juliet is the story of two individuals escaping the bounds of their densely knit groups. It is a story of the social network revolution that began well before Facebook: the move from group-bound societies to networked individuals. This turn to networked individualism transforms communication from being place-based to person-based.
Tracee Orman

The Potter Games - 12 views

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    This is an interactive website based on the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure books/games. The characters of Harry Potter have been thrown into The Hunger Games (as tributes or mentors) by Lord Voldemort. The player chooses one of the characters and must read each passage, then makes a decision for that character, which could result in becoming the Victor...or "Reenervate" to try again.
    If you have students who like Harry Potter or The Hunger Games, they will have fun on this website. New characters are unlocked daily & we plan on writing more stories - one with the characters rebelling against Lord Voldemort and breaking out of the arena.
    It is great practice for reading skills - some characters have longer passages, some shorter. Some have up to 144 different scenarios (that's 144 pages of text). The least amount of reading for a player is 19 pages. So think about your low readers - that may be more than they read in a week by just playing one character.
    The writers who have/are contributing to this non-profit project include teachers, high school students, college students, professional writers, graphic artists, musicians, librarians, and so many more. We're all fans of both series, of course. :)
    (For grades 7 and up)
    I have a free download of lesson ideas for using The Potter Games in your classroom here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/The-Potter-Games-Using-Interactive-Fiction-to-Improve-Reading
Mark Smith

Reading and the Web - Texts Without Context - NYTimes.com - 14 views

  • We all may read books the way we increasingly read magazines and newspapers: a little bit here, a little bit there.
  • People tweet and text one another during plays and movies, forming judgments before seeing the arc of the entire work.
  • Recent books by respected authors like Malcolm Gladwell (“Outliers”), Susan Faludi (“The Terror Dream”) and Jane Jacobs (“Dark Age Ahead”) rely far more heavily on cherry-picked anecdotes — instead of broader-based evidence and assiduous analysis — than the books that first established their reputations. And online research enables scholars to power-search for nuggets of information that might support their theses, saving them the time of wading through stacks of material that might prove marginal but that might have also prompted them to reconsider or refine their original thinking.
Adam Babcock

One U.S. Corporation's Role in Egypt's Brutal Crackdown | Save the Internet - 7 views

  • Egypt, where the Mubarak regime today reportedly shut down Internet and cell phone communications -- a troubling predictor of the fierce crackdown that has followed.
  • The tools that connect, organize and empower protesters can also be used to hunt them down.
  • Narus provides Egypt Telecom with Deep Packet Inspection equipment (DPI), a content-filtering technology that allows network managers to inspect, track and target content from users of the Internet and mobile phones, as it passes through routers on the information superhighway.
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  • arus global customers include the national telecommunications authorities in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia -- two countries that regularly register alongside Egypt near the bottom of Human Rights Watch's world report.
Mark Smith

Your Brain on Computers - Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime - NYTimes.com - 5 views

  • “Almost certainly, downtime lets the brain go over experiences it’s had, solidify them and turn them into permanent long-term memories,” said Loren Frank, assistant professor in the department of physiology at the university, where he specializes in learning and memory. He said he believed that when the brain was constantly stimulated, “you prevent this learning process.”
Katie Anderson

Monitor: The net generation, unplugged | The Economist - 6 views

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    Questions raised: Who actually makes up the population of digital natives? What do we really know about them? What are their behaviors actually demonstrating online?
Teresa Ilgunas

Readability - An Arc90 Lab Experiment - 5 views

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    Wow...hate distracting ads when you're trying to read? This website allows you to read just the text. You pick the size, then drag the icon to your browser's toolbar. Nice.
Patrick Higgins

Stanford Study of Writing - Home - 15 views

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    This is a great piece to have your staff discuss.
Meredith Stewart

News - For Teachers (Library of Congress) - 0 views

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    Call from LoC for students to help archive the internet. Also link to new LoC teachers' page
James Miscavish

Threat for Big Media: Guerrilla Video Sites - WSJ.com - 0 views

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    Mr. Martinez read aloud an email from a YouTVpc user saying that the link to the film "Old School" didn't work anymore. He said he would track down a working link. Another user wrote, "I want to know whether this service is legal or not," and asked whethe
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