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Cathy Oxley

Lion Television . Case Study . Horrible Histories - 13 views

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    Television series and interactive game based onHorrible Histories books
J Black

Full Disclosure » Blog Archive » Forget broadcasting, the future is narrowcasting | Blogs | - 0 views

  • Media organizations the world over are currently focusing on the future of their businesses. As audience and viewer attention fragments and the internet fuels a wholly different kind of information consumption there are many siren voices suggesting that traditional media business models are dead, or in some cases on life support. Rising print and distribution costs and flagging advertising are driving even flagship newspapers and magazines to slash their costs, jettison journalists and production staff, and in some cases, go entirely out of business. In Britain, television companies like ITV — once described as having a license to print money — are reconsidering their entire business rationale and, crucially, their future relationship with viewers and consumers. Yet this week the world’s largest multimedia news agency, Reuters, unveils what we believe will be the future of news dissemination — not broadcasting, but narrowcasting.
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    Media organizations the world over are currently focusing on the future of their businesses. As audience and viewer attention fragments and the internet fuels a wholly different kind of information consumption there are many siren voices suggesting that traditional media business models are dead, or in some cases on life support. Rising print and distribution costs and flagging advertising are driving even flagship newspapers and magazines to slash their costs, jettison journalists and production staff, and in some cases, go entirely out of business. In Britain, television companies like ITV - once described as having a license to print money - are reconsidering their entire business rationale and, crucially, their future relationship with viewers and consumers. Yet this week the world's largest multimedia news agency, Reuters, unveils what we believe will be the future of news dissemination - not broadcasting, but narrowcasting.
Amanda Kenuam

Kids Just Like You - Special Needs Episode - 0 views

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    "special needs, learning, lessons, children, television, asperger's, interaction"
Steve Ransom

Understanding 9/11: A Television News Archive - 21 views

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    The 9/11 Television News Archive is a library of news coverage of the events of 9/11/2001 and their aftermath as presented by U.S. and international broadcasters. A resource for scholars, journalists, and the public, it presents one week of news broadcasts for study, research and analysis.
Jeff Johnson

Broward teachers learn a lesson from an 11-year-old - Miami-Dade - MiamiHerald.com - 0 views

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    In most schools, the adults teach the children. But in some Broward County classrooms on Friday, the roles were reversed. The teacher was Adora Svitak, an 11-year-old prodigy and published author from Washington state. She delivered the day's lesson -- a seminar on effective teaching -- live from the television studio in her basement in Redmond. It was broadcast through the Internet into 10 South Florida middle schools.
J Black

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 1 views

  • New media demand new literacies. Because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, widely distributed new media tools, being literate now means being able to read and write a number of new media forms, including sound, graphics, and moving images in addition to text.
  • New media coalesce into a collage. Being literate also means being able to integrate emerging new media forms into a single narrative or "media collage," such as a Web page, blog, or digital story.
  • New media are largely participatory, social media. Digital literacy requires that students have command of the media collage within the context of a social Web, often referred to as Web 2.0. The social Web provides venues for individual and collaborative narrative construction and publication through blogs and such services as MySpace, Google Docs, and YouTube. As student participation goes public, the pressure to produce high-quality work increases.
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  • Historically, new media first appear to the vast majority of us in read-only form because they are controlled by a relatively few technicians, developers, and distributors who can understand or afford them. The rest of us only evolve into writers once the new media tools become easy to use, affordable, and widely available, whether these tools are cheap pencils and paper or inexpensive digital tools and shareware.
  • Thus, a new dimension of literacy is now in play—namely, the ability to adapt to new media forms and fit them into the overall media collage quickly and effectively.
  • n the mid 1960s, Marshall McLuhan explained that conventional literacy caused us to trade an ear for an eye, and in so doing, trade the social context of the oral tradition for the private point of view of reading and writing. To him, television was the first step in our "retribalization," providing a common social experience that could serve as the basis for dialogue in the global village.2  However, television told someone else's story, not ours. It was not until Web 2.0 that we had the tools to come full circle and produce and consume social narrative in equal measure. Much of the emerging nature of literacy is a result of inexpensive, widely available, flexible Web 2.0 tools that enable anyone, regardless of technical skill, to play some part in reinventing literacy.
  • What is new is that the tools of literacy, as well as their effects, are now a topic of literacy itself.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital tools, but also when to use them and why.
  • The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • They need to be the guide on the side rather than the technician magician.
Steve Ransom

Portland high schools take byte out of laptop use at home | The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram - 15 views

  • She said she never wanted her children to have television in their bedrooms. But thanks to streaming sites like Hulu and YouTube, laptop computers also function as television sets.
    • Steve Ransom
       
      Well, don't let them take their wireless laptops into their bedrooms!!!
Aman Khani

OTT Video Platform: Changing the Face of Digital Media - 0 views

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    With the advancement of technology, there has been an immense success in the field of television broadcasting & internet technology.
Tero Toivanen

How To Define Web 3.0 | How To Split An Atom - 1 views

  • I think I have managed to explain Web 3.0 quite nicely, so without further ado. Definition: Highly specialized information silos, moderated by a cult of personality, validated by the community, and put into context with the inclusion of meta-data through widgets.
  • Web 3.0 will take this one step further. If you are searching for information on Cars, for example, you would use the search engine as you normally would, but your results would be more specialized subengines.
  • Web 2.0 brought us a change in the basic way that we search, tagging.
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  • The strong algorithms that are currently used would be kept, but in addition some weight would be given to items that the community has flagged as interesting or voted on. Meme: Community built around search results.
  • You could type in what you were looking for, “conservative viewpoint on Darwin” for example and it would pull up results ordered by relevance (algorithms), tagging, and validation through user voting.
  • Seeking Validation
  • Seeking Entertainment
  • StumbleUpon may be the closest analogy to how we will be entertained in Web 3.0. You fill out a profile, define your tags and then flip the channel.
  • Meme: Relevance through user interaction.
  • Imagine a world where you could search a name and bring up that person, all the social networks they belong to, and produce a feed around them.
  • If I put a proper name into the search engine of Web 3.0 it would provide the running profile of my presence on the web; it would show everything in the webosphere that has been tagged as belonging to me, ordered by community validation and relevance.
  • In this Wikiality my page would contain both information that I have written about myself and information that has been written about me.
  • Meme: Everyone will have Page Rank.
  • Web 3.0 will see a more complete integration between devices like cell phones and the world wide web (does anything still use that term?) Posting pictures, videos and text from anywhere, anytime with as little hassle as possible.
  • Our pages will be little more than our personal interpretations of all the data available on the web, plugged into these pages through a growing array of widgets and shared with the world. Meme: The Widget Web
  • Summary Specialized Subengines for Search Social Networks replaced by People Search Your Online Presence Searchable, Taggable and Ordered by Relevance through Voting and Algorithms Increased Microblogging and more Powerful Widgets to allow you to place any of your feeds anywhere. Increased Integration between devices like cell phones and the web.
  • In ten years RSS and its related technologies will be seen as the single most important internet technology since Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau created the World Wide Web at CERN around 17 years ago.
  • If Web 3.0 is the Semantic Web, where computer agents read content like human beings do — then RSS will be its eyes (or at least its corrective lenses).
  • In this future, RSS will be extended to include a host of data-points it currently does not. Each blog post (or microblogging feed), every picture, every video clip will have searchable, taggable, XML based syndication around it.
  • Finally, RSS enables users to define their own contexts for information. Imagine a word where creating a mashup between Google maps and your Twitter account was no more difficult than sticking a few widgets together.
  • If you used a search engine, your results would be weighted based not only on the standard Web 3.0 metrics, but also on “what you care about” as defined by all your previous interactions with this particular search engine and all of this would be completely transparent.
  • Programs that surf the web for you will become more and more powerful. In a world where your personal profile containing your likes, dislikes and search history is as easy to upload as it is to add a feed to your RSS reader, it is no surprise that a major industry will be software that does your searching for you.
  • Microblogging will be the critical change in the way we write in Web 3.0. Imagine a world where your mobile phone, your email, and you television could all produce feedback that could easily be pushed to any or all blogging platforms. If you take a picture from your smart-phone, it would be automatically tagged, bagged and forwarded to your “lifestream”. If you rated a television show that you were watching, your review would be forwarded into the stream.
  • Fortunately, microblogging also opens up the world to new opportunities. Live blogging, a technique usually reserved for important events, would become common. If you can’t actually be at a conference, pictures, video and commentary could be pushed to you in real time. The entire world would become an Op-Ed piece.
  • In Web 3.0 search engines will need to have a better understanding of “context”. One way to accomplish this is to take a nod from directories and allow results to be tagged. These tags can be voted on by the community and would only be an addition to, not a replacement for, traditional sorting algorithms.
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    How To Define Web 3.0 | How To Split An Atom
Aman Khani

Enhance-playout-efficiencies-with-next-gen-cloud-technologies.pdf - 1 views

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    Learn how B4U Television Network transitioned their global playout to Amagi CLOUDPORT to drastically reduce OPEX, support new revenue opportunities and future market expansions, while retaining agility to respond to constant technology changes with ease. Visit us:- http://www.amagi.com/
Peter Horsfield

Joseph Prince - Free Extraordinary Profiles - 0 views

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    Grace. In this word revolves the life and ministry of Joseph Prince, who is one of the world's most influential ministers today, reaching millions with his television broadcasts and books. It is quite amazing to see how a former stuttering high school student would rise to become one of the leading voices of Christianity and be one of the most successful pastors in the world. Read the story of this extraordinary preacher and witness the incredible power of grace that worked in his life.
Peter Horsfield

Extraordinary People - T.D. Jakes - 0 views

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    Named as the 'Next Billy Graham,' T.D. Jakes certainly lives up to his reputation: he is one of today's most influential preachers in the world, with his television show being aired daily in more than one hundred countries worldwide, reaching millions of people with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. His church, "The Potter's House," a congregation of more than thirty thousand members, is among the ten largest protestant churches in the United States.
Peter Horsfield

Ric O'Barry - Extraordinary People Changing the Game - 0 views

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    Meet the extraordinary Richard O'Barry. He is a former dolphin hunter and trainer who turned activist after one of the dolphins he trained died in his arms. He is most popular for being the trainer of the five dolphins that were used in the 1960s television series "Flipper", as well as being the founder of the international organization "The Dolphin Project". "Everything starts with a dream". To read more about Richard O'Barry visit www.thextraordinary.org
Peter Horsfield

David Bellamy - Extraordinary People Changing the Game - 0 views

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    Meet the extraordinary world-renowned author, environmental campaigner, botanist and former broadcaster who is most famous for his numerous television shows in BBC in the seventies and eighties, as well as his activism against the theory of global warming, David Bellamy. Throughout his career, he has been significant in promoting environmental care and protection. "When I see that the truth is being covered up I have to voice my ­opinions". To read more about David Bellamy visit www.thextraordinary.org
justquestionans

Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help - 1 views

Get help for Ashford-University ECE 332 Homework and Assignment Help. We provide assignment, homework, discussions and case studies help for all subjects Ashford-University for Session 2017-2018. ...

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