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Ruth Howard

Digital Ethnography » Blog Archive » Toward a New Future of "Whatever" - 0 views

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    A brief history of "whatever" fab!
Dennis OConnor

Digital Ethnography - 0 views

  • a Kansas State University working group led by Dr. Michael Wesch dedicated to exploring and extending the possibilities of digital ethnography.
  • Almost 9 months ago, the College of Wooster president, Grant Cornwell, forwarded my video to a remarkable collection of people who were daring and creative enough to think they could dance it … not just dance to it … but truly dance it.
  • This little smartpen from livescribe just might revolutionize my note-taking in seminars, discussions, and ethnographic interviews.  If you have never seen it before, check out some of the demos on YouTube.  In short, it records audio as you write and links what you are writing to the audio (by recording what you write through a small infrared camera near the tip of the pen).  When you are done recording you can actually tap the pen anywhere on your page and the pen will play the audio that was recorded at the time you were making that specific pen stroke. 
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    Best know for the great viral video the Web is using us, Michael Wesch is exploring web 2.0 as only an anthropologist could. Fascinating work. Interesting mind!
Ruth Howard

Basics - In a Helpless Baby, the Roots of Our Social Glue - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    Quote "Our capacity to cooperate in groups, to empathize with others and to wonder what others are thinking and feeling - all these traits, Dr. Hrdy argues, probably arose in response to the selective pressures of being in a cooperatively breeding social group, and the need to trust and rely on others and be deemed trustworthy and reliable in turn. Babies became adorable and keen to make connections with every passing adult gaze. Mothers became willing to play pass the baby. "Dr. Hrdy points out that mother chimpanzees and gorillas jealously hold on to their infants for the first six months or more of life.Dr. Hrdy wrote her book in part to counter what she sees as the reigning dogma among evolutionary scholars that humans evolved their extreme sociality and cooperative behavior to better compete with other humans." Very cool.
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