Skip to main content

Home/ Classroom 2.0/ Group items tagged PLN

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Steve Ransom

Twitter is Stupid. (until you realize…) - 23 views

  • Saying Twitter is ‘stupid’ is like saying all of TV is stupid. All newspapers, all magazines, all radio, all movies. EVERYTHING is stupid if that’s how we think.
  • The truth of the matter is that if all you’re tuning in to is the worst, most annoying things you can find on TV or on the radio, then EVERY kind of media will provide a horrible experience.
  • Tune in to the channels that have the best shows, and your Twitter experience be awesome. Tune in to people that post junk, and you’ll hate it. It’s not the channel that’s stupid; it’s the content we choose to see. Ultimately, if your Twitter experience sucks, it’s your fault, not Twitters.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • CONTROL
  • A Twitter experience isn’t made in 2 minutes. It’s crafted over time. It occurs as you discover awesome people you’ve never heard of. It occurs when you begin to see the world differently because you’re exposed to the lives of interesting people from all over the globe. It occurs when you interact with them. It occurs when you inspire them, and are inspired by them.
  • If you’ve tried Twitter and left because all your friends were posting updates from the bar or sharing the latest and greatest cat meme pictures, maybe your friends aren’t who you should be following.
Jennifer Barnett

My 24/7 Personal PD Provider - 19 views

  •  
    Jennifer Barnett's blog post on professional learner at Education Week Teacher
Tero Toivanen

EDTEC 470 - Using Twitter to Learn from Others - 31 views

  •  
    "Reading RSS feeds is a great way to keep up with what's happening. But there's another technology that provides a different, more spontaneous window into the minds of other people. It's called Twitter and it's one of the fastest growing Web 2.0 technologies."
Bruce Huddleson

The Complete Educator's Guide to Using Google Reader | The Edublogger - 68 views

  •  
    via Skip Zalneraitis
Peter Shanks

A Personal Cyberinfrastructure - 18 views

  •  
    "So, how might colleges and universities shape curricula to support and inspire the imaginations that students need? Here's one idea. Suppose that when students matriculate, they are assigned their own web servers-not 1GB folders in the institution's web space but honest-to-goodness virtualized web servers of the kind available for $7.99 a month from a variety of hosting services" - should be a no-brainer for web development or any creative courses
Steve Ransom

Seth Godin on social networking. - YouTube - 14 views

  •  
    Great video spot on creating a purposeful and valuable network... not just one with  big head count.
Steve Ransom

The 10 Worst Mistakes of First-Time Job Hunters - Finance and Accounting Jobs News and ... - 9 views

  •  
    Some salient and relevant advice for 21st century learners!

    "I would have actually networked."
    "I would have gotten more involved in career-relevant extracurricular activities.""I would have focused more on becoming 'professional.'""I would have kept better track of my achievements.""I would have focused more on developing relevant skills."
Steve Ransom

The Social Network Paradox | TechCrunch - 18 views

  • Instead, there is a new trend happening: We’re not really paying attention to our friends we’re connected to online. Take Twitter, for example. Twitter used to be a great place for many early adopters to talk tech. It wasn’t so long ago that there were few enough people on Twitter that you could read every single tweet in your stream.

    But as the network began to become more dense, and people found more people they knew and liked on Twitter, they began following hundreds of people, and reading all those tweets became impossible. This is such a fact of life that entire companies are based on the premise that you have too many friends on Facebook and Twitter to really pay attention to what they’re saying.

  • Therein lies the paradox of the social network that no one wants to admit: as the size of the network increases, our ability to be social decreases.

  • As the number of bits, photos and links coming over these networks grew, each of those invisibly began to decrease in worth.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • But as the number of friends begins to increase—particularly over that magic Dunbar number of 150—the spell begins to wear off. At this scale, we simply can’t easily keep track of it all. When our number of connections rises above 150 everything becomes simply comments, as real conversations tax our already limited ability to interface with the network.
  • That mythical thing, social connection, doesn’t flow over these networks; information flows over these networks. The only reason the network ever felt meaningful was because, at small scale, the network operated like a community. But that breaks apart at large scale.
  • The thing about all these is that they’re not a shared experience—they are my experiences, which I am sharing with you, but you probably cannot experience with me—my thoughts or fascination with the article I just posted, the feeling of getting on that plane, or the thrill of watching the Sharks tie the game. Perhaps you can compare your notes of your own experience of these things; that’s what most Twitter conversation seems to be, to me, but the experiences are not shared.

    This differs from a discussion in a community, such as the type that occurs on SB Nation game day threads. The conversation does not center around any one individual’s experience, but rather the collective condition of the community. The conversation is the experience. Each comment is driven with the purpose of evoking and expressing the emotions that the community experiences, and particularly the ones they hold in common.

  •  
    Great article.
Melissa Smith

Oh the Places! - 24 views

  •  
    Oh the Places - vanmeters' blog
1 - 20 of 54 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page