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Paul Beaufait

Strategies for Diving into Successful Grading Reform - 2 views

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    In this article, Jay C. Percell outlined "issues at stake, address[ed] ... common hesitancies ..., and offer[ed] ... tips for success ... gleaned ... [from] 15 years of alternative grading" (¶2).
Paul Beaufait

PBL Pilot: Matching PBL With Traditional Grading | Edutopia - 22 views

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    "Editor's Note: Matt Weyers and co-author Jen Dole, teachers at Byron Middle School in Byron, Minnesota, present the fifth installment in a year-long series documenting their experience of launching a PBL pilot program."
erikerickson

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | MindShift - 41 views

  • pupils today can change the way they study to exploit the brain’s quirky learning processes, using the strategies revealed by memory and learning research
  • Students need to understand that learning happens not only during reading and studying, but in all sorts of ways, so that they can examine their own habits to know which ones may be helping or not, and make adjustments
  • We can be tactical in our schooling.
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • forgetting serves as a powerful spam filter
  • when the brain has to work hard to retrieve a half-forgotten memory (such as when reviewing new vocabulary words you learned the day before), it re-doubles the strength of that memory.
  • The brain is a foraging learner.
  • The human brain evolved to pick up valuable pieces of information here and there, on the fly, all the time, and put it all together
  • and it’s not only during study or practice
  • By foraging in this way, the brain is “building knowledge continually
  • Forgetting isn’t always bad.
  • Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.
  • Varying the studying environment
  • can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.
  • A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.
  • Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it
  • Experimenting With Learning Tactics
  • benefits of sleep (which improves retention and comprehension of what you learn), perceptual learning modules and mixing up different kinds of related problems or skills in practice sessions instead of repetitively rehearsing just one skill at a time.
  • teachers see all sorts of reforms come and go, and they’re skeptical
  • Surviving the Modern Jungle
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    Chen sums up an interview about Benedict Carey's book, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens, highlighting and exemplifying take-away messages for self-directed learners as well as teachers.
Paul Beaufait

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer | MindShift - 50 views

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    Thanks to Nik Peachey for pointing out this post on one of his Scoop.it sites. In this post, Katrina Schwartz (2012.10.26) provides a pointer to the Right Question Institute (an NPO), introduces a new book about inquiry-based learning, and explains, "Coming up with the right question involves vigorously thinking through the problem, investigating it from various angles, turning closed questions into open-ended ones[,] and prioritizing which are the most important questions to get at the heart of the matter" (¶4). An excerpt from the book spells out rules for student engagement in forming questions about topics under investigation.
Paul Beaufait

Making Mistakes is Important to Learning - 36 views

  • The integration of technology into the curriculum will not succeed unless teachers are allowed to make mistakes as they practice, explore, conceptualize, and collaborate with their peers and instructors.
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    Dr. Nellie Deutsch (2012.08.03) argued that in order to successfully integrate technology to teachers' practices, they must endeavour "to embrace their mistakes" (Fear of Making Mistakes, ¶2), with personal as well as technological support (Technology at School, & Teachers Need Support).
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