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John Evans

Science Infographics Breakdown STEM Subjects as Visual Maps - 1 views

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    "It's often easy to get stuck into a narrow view of what a particular field of study entails, but as Dominic Walliman reveals in his impressive science infographics, there's much more than meets the eye when thinking of particular STEM subjects. Walliman demonstrates the diversity and complexity of biology, chemistry, computer science, physics, and mathematics in visual maps that explore the breadth of each field.

    Walliman, who also created animated videos exploring his science infographics, manages to pack all the shades of each complex field on one page. For instance, the Map of Mathematics travels from the origins and foundations of the field to the differences between pure mathematics and applied mathematics. Likewise, chemistry is divided between rules and different sub-topics like biochemistry and inorganic chemistry, with fun illustrations to clearly show what falls underneath each area.

    Whether you are a scientist who feels like people never quite get what you do or a student who can't put their finger on how they might use their math or science degree, Walliman's infographics will come in handy. Consider them roadmaps to possible careers or cheat sheets to figuring out how quantum physics is related to the theory of relativity. Best of all, by studying the visual maps, it becomes easy to see how all these scientific fields overlap and fit together like a puzzle."
John Evans

Google Maps now lets you send directions to your iPhone from desktop search | iMore - 0 views

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    "If you're planning a trip in the near future, Google Maps got a nice update that's sure to come in handy. Users can now send directions from their desktop browser straight to their iPhone."
John Evans

This Amazing Collection of Historical Maps Just Got Easier to See | WIRED - 3 views

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    "IT JUST GOT way, way easier to search and browse the US Geological Survey's collection of historical topographic maps, thanks to a new online map viewer. These maps-more than 178,000 of them-date back to 1880, and they cover the entire country. Best of all, they're free to download for anyone who wants to, say, check out the contours of the Grand Canyon or study the urbanization of the San Francisco Bay Area (see below)."
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