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Nick West

what happened to the "Read Later" button? - 342 views

toolbar suggestion

started by Nick West on 23 Aug 08
  • Nick West
     
    Hmm, I just noticed in the new toolbar that I can't find the "Read Later" button that I used all the time in the previous version. I see the "Unread" folder to the right of the toolbar...but how do I put items in there??



    I *really* liked the functionality of clicking once on the "Read Later" and having the page disappear!



    Nick
  • jplumey
     
    Me too! I used that daily. Where did it go?
  • Joel Liu
     
    To put a link in to Unread folder
    1) Click bookmark button, check Unread before you add a bookmark
    OR
    2) Click the quick save icon(the book icon) beside the bookmark button.

    I *really* liked the functionality of clicking once on the "Read Later" and having the page disappear! ==>This feature is also in the Unread folder.
  • Nick West
     
    yes, this puts items into the Unread folder...but it also bookmarks them!

    I don't know if I want to bookmark a page until after I've read it.

    In addition, the page is still visible on my tab bar.

    I really liked the previous functionality, where *one click* would simultaneously put a page into an unread list, and close the tab in Firefox. Apparently that's not possible any longer.

    Maintaining my Unread list had nothing at all to do with my bookmarking activity -- it was just a quick (and very handy!) way to clean out several tabs that I didn't want to deal with until later.

    Any chance that we could have this functionality back as an option?

    thanks for listening!

    Nick
  • Nick West
     
    oh, I forgot to add in my previous reply:

    adding an "unread" item to my bookmark list also means that I have to go back into that list later and delete the bookmark if I don't want it to remain on my list.

    Previous behavior:
    *one click* to both put a page into the Unread list and to close the tab.

    Now I need at least six clicks to do the same thing and simultaneoudly keep my Bookmark list clean:

    1) click the quick save icon
    2) open a new tab for Diigo bookmarks
    3) go to My Bookmarks page
    4) (after finding the particular unread page I am trying to unbookmark, if there are several) select that bookmark
    5) choose "delete" from the action pull-down menu
    6) confirm delete

    I just want to reiterate that I really want to keep my Unread pages *out* of my Bookmark list altogether. If I end up reading a page and liking it, *then* I'll bookmark it -- but not before.

    It would be really great to have the old functionality back!

    thanks,

    Nick
  • jplumey
     
    I really miss this feature. I've just installed the Read It later plugin for Firefox. I'd rather use diigo for everything but seeing as you've taken away a useful feature AND you never bothered to tell us about the change, maybe it's for the best.
  • Nick West
     
    thanks for the pointer to the Read It later plug-in. It will do what I want 9although I still miss Diigo's old feature of automatically closing the page when you marked it for "Read Later" -- that made clean-up at the end of a long research day very easy!

    Nick
  • Joel Liu
     
    Ok. We will rethink about the feature.
  • jplumey
     
    Cool!

    May I ask what was the reason for removing it in the first place?


    Joel Liu wrote:
    > Ok. We will rethink about the feature.
  • jplumey
     
    I noticed that this feature is still missing. Are you planning on bringing it back? For my part, my use of Diigo has really dropped since this feature was removed.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    jplumey wrote:

    > I noticed that this feature is still missing.

    I never noticed it missing. Is/was the issue specific to Internet Explorer?

    I sometimes find that my Diigo Toolbar for Firefox preference to show the Quick Access Filter button* is lost, but a simple click on the Options button allows me to re-set that preference.

    * What's described as a button ('Quick Access Filter') seems to equate to two menus (not a button) within the toolbar. That's not a complaint - both the 'Recent' and 'Unread' menus are enormously useful.
  • jplumey
     
    I don't know about the IE toolbar, but the feature was pulled (as acknowledged here by Joel) from the Firefox toolbar some time back. They were going to review it and presumably put it back, but the latest update still lacks the feature.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    Using Diigo 3.1.6.5 in Firefox 3.0.3:

    1. click the menu triangle alongside the Bookmark button

    2. select 'One-click Save Options…'

    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
    By grahamperrin

    3. set your preference to 'Mark as unread'

    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
    By grahamperrin

    4. click 'Save'.

    From then on, until you clear your preference, the one-click save button will correspondingly mark as unread.

    Regards
    Graham
  • Joel Liu
     
    Thanks Graham.
  • Joel Liu
     
    We plan to make read it later feature more easy to use and better than before. Any feature request and suggestion are welcome.
  • anonymous
     
    Joel Liu wrote:
    > We plan to make read it later feature more easy to use and better than before. Any feature request and suggestion are welcome.

    Related to previous discussions about lists, groups and filtering, it seems features are being considered at face value to tackle an immediate user problems and not getting to the root of the problem. What I want, and want I am hearing from my friends and others in this group, are ways to personalize your view.

    I heard someone say prior they would like a means to segregate out "research" bookmarks without disrupting their standard bookmark list. On this thread, people are saying they want their "Read Later" option back. The problem is what people want to do is "personal" so if you try and tackle each personal wish directly, you'll be left with a ungainly mess of features. Perhaps I would like two "Read Later" tabs, one called "Later- hobby" and "Later- work". Why couldn't I be able to get that feature?

    What I suggest here, as in prior threads, is a more powerful, elegant way to tackle such problems, which will be flexible and intuitive to address EVERYONE's desires. Make some of the Diigo tabs uneditable, but create a means to make new personal tabs. Go ahead and put back the "Read later" tab, in that way you don't isolate new users from a powerful feature because they haven't learned it yet. Make the Read Later tab editable, like the other tabs, and have it view all bookmarks that have been placed in the Read Later list.

    These personal tabs will have a means to include/exclude lists, filter tags, other metadata anything you wish. That way if I want to make "Later- work", "Later- hobby", "Research" and "History- Tibet" views then I could do that. If you want to do a quick adjustment of your current view without making a new tab, you can do that too by choosing the same filtration interface on the current view. This filtration interface could start simple and grow in power by adding new filtration mechanisms over time. One powerful elegant feature addresses them all and still pulls new users into the fold by pre-defining a couple of useful ones for them as a default.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    > flexible and intuitive to address EVERYONE's desires. Make some of
    > the Diigo tabs uneditable, but create a means to make new personal
    > tabs

    I have (had) different ideas for tabs … less focused on bookmarks, more about Diigo as a whole.

    I rarely filter; I often search; I most often perform a range of actions (not always sequential) (often with a significant time gap between actions, but these gaps don't always equate to 'later'); and for actions, I like drag-and-drop. Everyone's moves may vary.

    I wish to drag content to destinations, and where tabs and other GUI elements are present, my temptation is: drag to these elements.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    >> read it later

    Focusing on this one feature, considering my current approach to Diigolet, I'd like … for the moment, let's call it: 'Laterlet' (that's a ridiculous name; call it whatever you like :)

    Alongside my Diigolet at position #1 in my Bookmarks Bar
    Thanks ImageShack!
    I place Laterlet in position 2, so I can

    command-1 for Diigolet
    command-2 to read later

    and in response to comamnd-2 a discreet dialogue/signal appears, just briefly, confirming that my request was acknowledged.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    >> We plan to make read it later feature more easy to use and better
    >> than before.



    Ignore the words 'current Diigo WebSlide' at the core.

    Defocus from the uppermost blob.

    The five things remaining - 
    public, Diigo groups, Diigo friends, private, Diigo lists - 
    are the 'approaches' that I'm most likely to take with 'it' when I 'read it later'.

    The rough sketch is

    * loosely based on the few Diigo routines with which I'm familiar

    * based on _assumptions_ about what's under the hood…
  • anonymous
     
    Graham, I believe my work method is similar to yours in that I don't necessarily use a whole lot of lists and I mostly search. Be that as it may, the search function could use considerable work as well.
  • anonymous
     
    Graham Perrin wrote:

    > I wish to drag content to destinations, and where tabs and other GUI elements are present, my temptation is: drag to these elements.

    Well I can certainly see why you like iTunes so much (I think iTunes is well designed as well, for the record), with their drag and drop features for assets. I wish there were ways to incorporate drag and drop functionality into Diigo, unfortunately being a web environment and also looking ahead at hand held interfaces, these are not conducive to drag and drop functionality. Diigo does have some drag and drop, with reordering of bookmarks in list, but they are certainly limited in their ability to do so.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    > web environment and also looking ahead at hand held interfaces,
    > these are not conducive to drag and drop functionality.

    Drag, or drag and drop can be fine in web environments including some hand helds; http://www.diigo.com/user/grahamperrin/widgets (I'm disocvering) but (a) let's not be sidetracked by widgets and (b) my bookmarking there is not Diigo-specific.
  • anonymous
     
    Graham wrote:
    > I wish to drag content to destinations, and where tabs and other GUI elements are present, my temptation is: drag to these elements.

    > Drag, or drag and drop can be fine in web environments including some hand helds;

    iphones not withstanding, as they don't allow click and drag functions in their interface.

    Well that is true, but I think drag and drop must be introduced in very specific isolated functions in web environments, because there is a certain assumption that takes place, setting a precedence, that as soon as someone learns there is drag and drop capability, they think it is implemented in all areas where that function could apply. That could get tedious and trying to continually attempt that function, only to fail, as is exhibited by your comment that you are tempted to drag elements.
  • Sean Brady
     
    Joel,

    Three features stand out to me in my use of the Read it Later extension for Firefox and the LaterLoop service.

    1) Both have the ability to take the reading list offline. I did that on my plane ride yesterday and it worked very well. I think this is a good feature for any reading list service.

    2) Read It Later integrates AideRSS as a method of sorting. It offers a nice way to sort the list other than by date/time. The Aiderss api allows the rankings to be done not only on idividual items, but on the items as they relate to your entire reading list which is awesome.

    3) Both of these services allow Google Reader users to add items to the reading list without opening the item in a new tab. Work straight from GR. Read It Later has the edge in the implementation here.

    I really like the idea of having a reading list that is not part of my bookmarks. I read a lot more than I add to Diigo, and adding these not really Bookmarks in would be a nice addition.
    Joel Liu wrote:
    > We plan to make read it later feature more easy to use and better than before. Any feature request and suggestion are welcome.
  • Graham Perrin
     
    Joel Liu wrote:

    > We plan to make read it later feature more easy to use and better
    > than before. Any feature request and suggestion are welcome.

    From Sean's comments, re-ordered slightly:

    > 2) Read It Later integrates AideRSS …

    Interesting. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AideRSS leads me to http://www.postrank.com/ and I'll do some reading.

    > 3) … Google Reader … Work straight from GR …

    Historically I haven't 'enjoyed' reading RSS but more recently, on the bus I have appreciated the RSS features of Apple Mail. Then (coincidence) in the last couple of days I have appreciated how Mail, how Google x, y and z can integrate _very_ neatly with another 'later-oriented' application/service combination that's a favourite of mine.

    @ Sean: will you be happy for me to message you off-forum re: Google Reader + Gears? (What I have to ask may be fairly off-topic from Diigo Community.)

    > 1) … reading list offline …

    To me, off-line aspects are most interesting, in particular:

    a) the things that _we do_ with our 'stuff' before, during and after our off-line time

    b) the _services_ that we might like an application or service to perform for us (whilst _we do little or nothing_) before, during and after our off-line time

    -- and preconceptions of both (a) and (b).

    Thanks to some prompting from Scott Allam, I considered an existing application for iPhone, compared it with a more familiar desktop application that was behaving in iPhone-like ways long before iPhone was even rumoured, then took a trip to an online room -- a developer channel -- to chat about feasibility.

    (Off-topic: an amusing experience; the visitor is greeted with profanity and despite the presence of hundreds of people, conversation was obtuse and (ahem) concise, so it took me over half an hour to gain an answer to a simple question. Somewhere between their obtuseness and my verbosity, there is A Happy Land. But I shouldn't complain; much was learnt :)

    On-topic: I'll pose some questions about what you might/might not like about off-line experiences. Nothing too wordy, and yes/no answers should suffice :)

    In the meantime: related to off-line, some in-forum references to Google Gears:

    http://www.diigo.com/annotated/c98c4fb05f3487655836a2c9e34a27c5 (2007-09-24)
    http://www.diigo.com/annotated/b937f7c09b50851f464766f425e9ec0e (2008-04-09)
    http://www.diigo.com/annotated/7e1da199f8fcd971dfce4a3fd76bca28 (2008-11-23)

    Postscript: corrections to grammar
  • Sean Brady
     
    Graham,

    Sorry about that, yes AideRSS did re-brand to Postrank. And yes, feel free to contact me re. gears and Google Reader.

    sean
  • Joel Liu
     
    Thanks for everyone

    Scott had a good point that we can't respond every request with a feature. Here is an idea to solve the problem.

    Upgrade quick access filter feature to a more powerful smart folder feature. It contains the following kinds of folder.

    1. Filter by tag
    2. Filter by List
    3. Recent bookmarks
    4. Filter by group.
    5.Frequently access bookmarks folder
    6. Folder for bookmarklet ( that means it can contain javascript )
    7. Read it later ( Users can define the behavior of marking bookmarks in this folder as read, for example, whether remove the bookmark from server etc )

    Users can create multiple folders of each kind.

    Need your comments.

    Thanks.
  • Joel Liu
     
    Hey Graham,
    With toolbar installed, you can drag and drop a URL to a quick access filter folder and it will be bookmarked automatically.
  • Joel Liu
     
    @Sean,
    Y sorting by popularity/importance from social metrics is a very good idea. We will consider how to adopt this concept in diigo system.

    Thanks.
  • anonymous
     
    Joel Liu said:
    > Users can create multiple folders of each kind.
    >
    When you say "folder" are you talking conceptually (as in a container, like the various tabs) or are you thinking about adding an additional organizational convention all together?

    It is almost like you are creating an Advanced Search function which could be applied to your current view or applied to a user created tab (or Smart Folder, if you will).

    I am all for more powerful ways to segment your collection of bookmarks to only view what you deem to be the most relevant for that situation.
  • Joel Liu
     
    > When you say "folder" are you talking conceptually (as in a container, like the various tabs) or are you >thinking about adding an additional organizational convention all together?


    i mean a more powerful quick access filter in the toolbar.
    From my experience, it seems only few percent of people are using tab in My bookmark page. I am not sure how many people will use the user created tab feature even it is more powerful.
  • anonymous
     
    Joel, yes, I think that would be a perfect item to increase its power and the most obvious place to start, in my opinion. The new tabs idea could be explored over time (or even accessing the "named views" from an available pull down menu if that be more feasible to develop in a web environment). What I think would happen is those that do take advantage of a more powerful quick access filter, may find themselves doing specific filtrations repetitively and therefore would like a way to access that by name (or tab, if the case may be).

    The Mac Smart Folder feature:
    http://www.macworld.com/article/60315/2007/10/smartfolders.html
  • Graham Perrin
     
    Joel Liu wrote:

    > Hey Graham,
    > With toolbar installed, you can drag and drop a URL to a quick
    > access filter folder and it will be bookmarked automatically.

    My use of Diigo Toolbar is extremely rare (I brushed the dust off only when I began to report issues; again, now, Firefox is gathering dust) but still:

    * thanks, Joel -- other users will certainly
      use and appreciate this tip :)
  • Graham Perrin
     
    Joel Liu wrote:

    > Upgrade quick access filter feature

    First, please:

    * introduce the feature to a broader user base!

    Using Diigolet, I don't see the feature.

    My twopenneth :)
  • Graham Perrin
     
    Joel Liu wrote:

    > 1. Filter by tag
    > 2. Filter by List
    > 3. Recent bookmarks
    > 4. Filter by group.

    > 7. Read it later ( Users can define the behavior of
    > marking bookmarks in this folder as read, for example, whether
    > remove the bookmark from server etc )
    >
    > Users can create multiple folders of each kind.
    >
    > Need your comments.
    >
    > Thanks.

    Sorry for going off on one earlier … through the web, I would definitely use most of the features suggested above.

    > 5.Frequently access bookmarks folder

    I'd probably not use this.

    For anything to be found frequently, I'd use the search feature of Diigo (with some minor exceptions, some of which are reported, it _does_ fairly consistently find what I seek).

    > 6. Folder for bookmarklet ( that means it can contain javascript )

    Please, can you elaborate on that one? (A rough sketch maybe?)

    Thanks
    Graham
  • Graham Perrin
     
    > From my experience, it seems only few percent of
    > people are using tab in My bookmark page. I am not sure how many
    > people will use the user created tab feature even it is more powerful.

    It took me a long time to discover the tabs under My Bookmarks for a number of reasons:

    * tabs are too broadly separated from where tabs ought to be; too low
    * ads should be to one side, never disrupting important navigation
    * rows of tabs should not be separated by search box(es)
    * tabs ought to be blue (signifying click-ability) but they're grey in a sea of blue
    * et cetera.

    More than anything: I have used My Bookmarks interface very little because I have made so much _more_ use of the Diigo Groups view of bookmarks; and in that view I have become accustomed to _not_ finding the features I want (so it's a pleasant surprise when I find the features present in My Bookmarks).

    (Not forgetting that group-oriented features are relatively new additions to Diigo. Sorry for having moaned! :)

    In any case, things shouldn't be judged on percentages alone ... cross-reference the topics that discuss rankings ;)

    The under-used web interface may reflect the fact that it needs a little overhaul and rationalisation.

    Best,
    Graham
  • anonymous
     
    Graham Perrin wrote:

    > The under-used web interface may reflect the fact that it needs a little overhaul and rationalisation.

    Excellent, excellent points here Graham. Hats off. Also, the items currently found in the tabs (private, public, tagged, annotated) maybe useful to some, but not to others. Having the ability to assign personal relevance to tabs would make them in more demand, not to mention some design efforts to make them a bit more prominent.

    Think tabs in the browser... they are quite common place and heavily used. But it isn't the "tab" feature that I am MOST married to. Its the ability to create a personal view based on specific parameters and being able to save that for quick recall. Think to other discussions here of people who have a problem with the "ALL" tab in "My Bookmarks" and how they do not really reflect their true bookmark list. I bet they wish they could define one for themselves and they would use that tab religiously. I know I would.

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