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Matti Narkia

Vitamin D, nervous system and aging. - Tuohimaa et al. - Psychoneuroendocrinology Volum... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D, nervous system and aging.
    P. Tuohimaa, T. Keisala, A. Minasyan, J. Cachat and A. Kalueff. .
    Psychoneuroendocrinology, Volume 34, Supplement 1, December 2009, Pages S278-S286
    NEUROACTIVE STEROIDS: EFFECTS AND MECHANISMS OF ACTION
    doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2009.07.003

    This is a mini-review of vitamin D3, its active metabolites and their functioning in the central nervous system (CNS), especially in relation to nervous system pathologies and aging. The vitamin D3 endocrine system consists of 3 active calcipherol hormones: calcidiol (25OHD3), 1α-calcitriol (1α,25(OH)2D3) and 24-calcitriol (24,25(OH)2D3). The impact of the calcipherol hormone system on aging, health and disease is discussed. Low serum calcidiol concentrations are associated with an increased risk of several chronic diseases including osteoporosis, cancer, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, hypertension, atherosclerosis and muscle weakness all of which can be considered aging-related diseases. The relationship of many of these diseases and aging-related changes in physiology show a U-shaped response curve to serum calcidiol concentrations. Clinical data suggest that vitamin D3 insufficiency is associated with an increased risk of several CNS diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, seasonal affective disorder and schizophrenia. In line with this, recent animal and human studies suggest that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with abnormal development and functioning of the CNS. Overall, imbalances in the calcipherol system appear to cause abnormal function, including premature aging, of the CNS.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D and Disease Incidence Prevention | Free The Animal - 1 views

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    "For what reason I don't know, but this January 2009 editorial by William Faloon of the Life Extension Foundation is making the rounds. Perhaps it just came available on the web.

    It's a good read, particularly in light of the billions and trillions of dollars the thieves & thugs in DC are about to flush down the crapper on your behalf. Some notable excerpts.

    A large number of new vitamin D studies have appeared in the scientific literature since I wrote my plea to the federal government. These studies don't just confirm what we knew 16 months ago-they show that optimizing vitamin D intake will save even more lives than what we projected.

    For instance, a study published in June 2008 showed that men with low vitamin D levels suffer 2.42 times more heart attacks. Now look what this means in actual body counts.

    Each year, about 157,000 Americans die from coronary artery disease-related heart attacks. Based on this most recent study, if every American optimized their vitamin D status, the number of deaths prevented from this kind of heart attack would be 92,500.

    To put the number of lives saved in context, tens of millions of dollars are being spent to advertise that Lipitor® reduces heart attacks by 37%. This is certainly a decent number, but not when compared with how many lives could be saved by vitamin D. According to the latest study, men with the higher vitamin D levels had a 142% reduction in heart attacks."
Matti Narkia

Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies: Serum vitamin D and prostate cancer risk - Scien... - 1 views

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    Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies: Serum vitamin D and prostate cancer risk.
    Yin L, Raum E, Haug U, Arndt V, Brenner H.
    Cancer Epidemiol. 2009 Dec;33(6):435-45. Epub 2009 Nov 25.
    PMID: 19939760
    doi:10.1016/j.canep.2009.10.014

    CONCLUSIONS: According to available evidence from longitudinal studies, serum 25(OH)D is not associated with PC incidence.
Matti Narkia

NephroPal: Vitamin D - The saga goes on... - 0 views

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    "Had enough about reading/hearing about Vitamin D? Well, it keeps on coming. And for my lack of surprise, the medical community in general is not catching on like wild fire. I really don't understand it.
    A recent study from the Heart Institute at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City (click) followed 27,686 patients greater than 50 years of age with no prior history of cardiovascular disease. The Vitamin D levels were checked and classified as such:

    * normal - greater than 30 ng/ml

    * low - 15 to 30

    * very low - less than 15

    The results of the study showed that patients with very low Vitamin D levels in comparison to normal had:

    * 77% greater risk of death

    * 45% increased risk of coronary artery disease

    * 78% increased risk of stroke

    * twice the risk of developing heart failure"
Matti Narkia

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of ovarian cancer - ScienceDirect - European Jou... - 0 views

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    Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of ovarian cancer.
    Toriola AT, Surcel HM, Agborsangaya C, Grankvist K, Tuohimaa P, Toniolo P, Lukanova A, Pukkala E, Lehtinen M.
    Eur J Cancer. 2009 Aug 25. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19713101
    doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2009.08.002

    Conclusion
    Overall, we did not observe a significant association between serum 25-OHD concentrations and the risk of ovarian cancer. However, we found evidence suggestive of an increased risk among women with low to insufficient serum 25-OHD concentrations.
Matti Narkia

Lack of Association between Serum Levels of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and the Subsequent Risk... - 0 views

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    Lack of association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the subsequent risk of prostate cancer in Finnish men.
    Faupel-Badger JM, Diaw L, Albanes D, Virtamo J, Woodson K, Tangrea JA.
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2784-6.
    PMID: 18086789
    doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0672
Matti Narkia

Serum 25(OH)-Vitamin D Concentration and Risk of Esophageal Squamous Dysplasia - Cancer... - 0 views

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    Serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentration and risk of esophageal squamous dysplasia.
    Abnet CC, Chen W, Dawsey SM, Wei WQ, Roth MJ, Liu B, Lu N, Taylor PR, Qiao YL.
    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Sep;16(9):1889-93.
    PMID: 17855710
    doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0461

    Background: Squamous dysplasia is the precursor lesion for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and nutritional factors play an important role in the etiology of this cancer. Previous studies using a variety of measures for vitamin D exposure have reached different conclusions about the association between vitamin D and the risk of developing esophageal cancer.

    Conclusions: Higher serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with significantly increased risk of squamous dysplasia. No obvious source of measured or unmeasured confounding explains this finding.

    In conclusion, we found that a higher serum 25(OH)D concentration was associated with an increased risk of esophageal squamous dysplasia, the precursor lesion for ESCC. This finding concurs with our previous prospective study which found that higher vitamin D status was associated with increased risk of incident ESCC in this same population. These unexpected findings suggest that further studies of the association of vitamin D and digestive tract cancers are needed before the effect of vitamin D in different populations can be elucidated.
Matti Narkia

Prospective study of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentration and risk of oesophageal and g... - 0 views

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    Prospective study of serum 25(OH)-vitamin D concentration and risk of oesophageal and gastric cancers.
    Chen W, Dawsey SM, Qiao YL, Mark SD, Dong ZW, Taylor PR, Zhao P, Abnet CC.
    Br J Cancer. 2007 Jul 2;97(1):123-8. Epub 2007 Jun 5.
    PMID: 17551495

    We prospectively examined the relation between pretrial serum vitamin D status and risk of oesophageal and gastric cancers among subjects who developed cancer over 5.25 years of follow-up, including 545 oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), 353 gastric cardia adenocarcinomas, 81 gastric noncardia adenocarcinomas, and an age- and sex-stratified random sample of 1105 subjects.

    We found no associations for gastric cardia or noncardia adenocarcinoma. Among subjects with low vitamin D status, higher serum 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with significantly increased risk of ESCC in men, but not in women. Further refinements of the analysis did not suggest any factors, which could explain this unexpected result.

    In conclusion, we found a direct association between higher serum 25(OH)D concentration and increased risk of ESCC in men but not women in a large population-based prospective cohort study from rural China. We found no association with risk of gastric cardia or noncardia adenocarcinoma in either sex. Greater than 50% of our cohort had an inadequate serum 25(OH)D concentration, yet higher concentrations were associated with increased risk of ESCC compared to lower concentrations.
Matti Narkia

A Prospective Nested Case-Control Study of Vitamin D Status and Pancreatic Cancer Risk ... - 0 views

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    A prospective nested case-control study of vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk in male smokers.
    Stolzenberg-Solomon RZ, Vieth R, Azad A, Pietinen P, Taylor PR, Virtamo J, Albanes D.
    Cancer Res. 2006 Oct 15;66(20):10213-9.
    PMID: 17047087

    Higher vitamin D concentrations were associated with a 3-fold increased risk for pancreatic cancer (highest versus lowest quintile, >65.5 versus <32.0 nmol/L: OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.56-5.48, Ptrend = 0.001) that remained after excluding cases diagnosed early during follow-up. Contrary to expectations, subjects with higher prediagnostic vitamin D status had an increased pancreatic cancer risk compared with those with lower status. Our findings need to be replicated in other populations and caution is warranted in their interpretation and implication. Our results are intriguing and may provide clues that further the understanding of the etiology of this highly fatal cancer.

    In conclusion, contrary to expectation, subjects with higher 25(OH)D concentrations were at greater risk for pancreatic cancer compared with those with lower concentrations in our prospective study with long-term follow-up. Caution is warranted in the interpretation and implication of our findings, however, as vitamin D inadequacy is an important public health problem and adequate status is desirable to prevent bone and other diseases (5). Our results, however, are intriguing and may provide clues that further the understanding of the etiology of this highly fatal cancer.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and haplotypes, interactions with plasma 25... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms and haplotypes, interactions with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and prostate cancer risk.
    Mikhak B, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D, Platz EA, Hollis BW, Giovannucci E.
    Prostate. 2007 Jun 15;67(9):911-23.
    PMID: 17440943
    DOI: 10.1002/pros.20570

    RESULTS
    No association was found between these SNPs or their associated haplotypes and all PC subtypes except that haplotype 2 (A-f-b) with Cdx2 A, Fok1 f, and Bsm1 b alleles and haplotype 3 (A-F-B) with Cdx2 A, Fok1 F and Bsm1 B alleles compared to the most common haplotype (A-F-b), were associated with reduced risk of aggressive PC (high stage or Gleason sum 7; P = 0.02), both with two alleles suspected of being low risk. Carriers of the variant Cdx2 A allele who were deficient in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (15 ng/ml) compared to non-carriers with normal 25-hydroxyvitamin D, had a lower risk of total and poorly differentiated PCs (Gleason sum 7) (P for interaction = 0.02 and 0.04, respectively). Plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D deficiency (26 pg/ml) was associated with a threefold risk of poorly differentiated PC (P for interaction = 0.01) when comparing carriers of the Cdx2 A allele to non-carriers with normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

    CONCLUSION
    In this population of men, none of the VDR polymorphisms studied was associated with susceptibility to PC.

    Carriers of the variant Cdx2 A allele with low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D may experience a reduction in risk of total and poorly differentiated prostate cancers compared to non-carriers with adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D.
Matti Narkia

Serum Vitamin D Concentration and Prostate Cancer Risk: A Nested Case-Control Study -- ... - 0 views

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    Serum vitamin D concentration and prostate cancer risk: a nested case-control study.
    Ahn J, Peters U, Albanes D, Purdue MP, Abnet CC, Chatterjee N, Horst RL, Hollis BW, Huang WY, Shikany JM, Hayes RB; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Project Team.
    J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008 Jun 4;100(11):796-804. Epub 2008 May 27.
    PMID: 18505967
    doi:10.1093/jnci/djn152

    CONCLUSION: The findings of this large prospective study do not support the hypothesis that vitamin D is associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer; indeed, higher circulating 25(OH)D concentrations may be associated with increased risk of aggressive disease.

    In summary, results from this large prospective study of men who underwent standardized prostate cancer screening in the context of a screening trial do not support the hypothesis that higher serum vitamin D status is associated with decreased risk of prostate cancer. The study showed no association of vitamin D level with nonaggressive disease; however, it raises the possibility that higher vitamin D level may be associated with increased risks for aggressive disease, although a clear monotonic dose-response relationship was lacking. Along with recent reports of adverse associations for higher vitamin D status and risk of pancreatic (32) and esophageal (33,34) cancer, caution should be taken in recommending high doses of vitamin D or sunlight exposure to the general public for prostate cancer prevention. Future analyses are warranted to confirm these results and to further clarify the effects of vitamin D on aggressive prostate cancer.
Matti Narkia

How this horrible weather could give you heart disease | Mail Online - 0 views

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    "We are fond of grumbling about Britain's grey skies, but there may be a good medical reason for doing so. It seems the dreary weather is bad for our hearts - worse, even, than raised cholesterol and an unhealthy diet.

    That's the controversial claim being made by Dr David Grimes, a gastroenterologist from Blackburn. He's been gazing at the sky for 20 years for clues about why his patients get more sick than those in the south of the country.

    And what he's found turns key assumptions about heart disease on their head. 'It's not diet or cholesterol levels that raise your risk of heart disease,' he claims. 'It's where you live. People in the north are more likely to be ill because they get less sunshine

    Basically they are suffering from 'latitude' sickness. The link is vitamin D. While we get some from our diet, the main source is the sun - sunlight converts a compound in the skin into vitamin D, so the amount you make is directly related to the amount of sunshine you get.

    In a new book Dr Grimes argues the higher the level of vitamin D in your blood, the lower your risk of heart disease and a range of other illnesses.

    If he's right, what we need is not diet and lifestyle advice, but food fortified with vitamin D. For years the vitamin was thought to be useful only for preventing rickets.

    So how does he treat them? 'You can do it with diet,' he says 'One Bangladeshi woman eats oily fish every day and now has a vitamin D blood level of 40. 'We give supplements of 1,000 international units (IU) a day or we can give an injection of 300,000 IU that lasts for a year.

    'The patients respond well,' says Grimes 'but what's needed is a proper controlled, long-term trial and who is going to fund that? Not a drug company.'"
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D can save half million babies each year: study - foodconsumer.org - 0 views

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    "Friday Oct 16, 2009 (foodconsumer.org) -- Results of a new trial presented at an international research conference in Bruges suggest that vitamin D supplementation can reduce the risk of premature births and boost the health of newborn babies, the Times reported Oct 10.

    Vitamin D deficiency, which is common everywhere, has been linked in many previous studies to a variety of illnesses from heart disease, cancers, multiple sclerosis
    and many others.

    In the trial, Dr. Bruce Hollis and Dr. Carol Wagner of the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, gave one group of pregnant women 4,000 IUs per day of vitamin D at about three months of pregnancy. They gave a second group 400 IUs per day, amounts recommended by U.S. and UK"
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D supplementation during the first year of life and risk of schizophrenia: a Fi... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D supplementation during the first year of life and risk of schizophrenia: a Finnish birth cohort study.
    McGrath J, Saari K, Hakko H, Jokelainen J, Jones P, Järvelin MR, Chant D, Isohanni M.
    Schizophr Res. 2004 Apr 1;67(2-3):237-45.
    PMID: 14984883

    Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation during the first year of life is associated with a reduced risk of schizophrenia in males. Preventing hypovitaminosis D during early life may reduce the incidence of schizophrenia.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D levels associated with survival in lymphoma patients - 0 views

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    ScienceDaily (Dec. 5, 2009) - A new study has found that the amount of vitamin D in patients being treated for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was strongly associated with cancer progression and overall survival. The results will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in New Orleans.

    Also, several recent reports have concluded that vitamin D deficiency is associated with poor outcomes in other cancers, including breast, colon and head and neck cancer. This is the first study to look at lymphoma outcome
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Deficiency Lead to Disease - Dr. Weil's Weekly Bulletin - 0 views

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    "If you're running low on vitamin D - as an estimated 70 percent of the U.S. population is - your immune system may not be functioning as well as it should. As a result, you may be more vulnerable to infectious diseases than you would if your vitamin D levels were optimal. Worse, you could be at higher than normal risk of a long list of diseases including heart disease and several kinds of cancer. A report recently published journal, Future Microbiology, highlighted research at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, which has shown that vitamin D induces expression of an antimicrobial peptide gene called cathelicidin that is the "first line of defense" in the immune system's response to minor wounds, cuts and bacterial and viral infections. The regulation of cathelicidin by vitamin D could help explain its vital role in immune function. The report noted that vitamin D is a key cofactor in reducing inflammation, in blood pressure control and helping to protect against heart disease. Author Adrian Gombart explains that there is still much to explore about D's mechanisms of action, the potential use of synthetic analogs of it in new treatments, and its duty in fighting infection."
Matti Narkia

Low vitamin D linked with CVD risk factors in teens - theheart.org - 0 views

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    "March 18, 2009 | Marlene Busko

    Palm Harbor, FL - In a large study of adolescents, low serum levels of 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) strongly predicted prevalence of hypertension, hyperglycemia, and metabolic syndrome [1]. The findings were reported at the AHA 49th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention.

    Adolescents with vitamin-D levels in the lowest quartile were almost four times more likely to have metabolic syndrome than those with vitamin-D levels in the highest quartile. "I think that is quite alarming," lead author Dr Jared P Reis (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD) said in an AHA podcast issued to the media."
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D association with estradiol and progesterone in young women - Cancer Causes Co... - 0 views

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    Vitamin D association with estradiol and progesterone in young women.
    Knight JA, Wong J, Blackmore KM, Raboud JM, Vieth R.
    Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Nov 15. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19916051

    Conclusions Higher levels of vitamin D may reduce progesterone and estradiol, providing a potential mechanism for reduction in breast cancer risk from increased vitamin D exposure in young women
Matti Narkia

Effects Of Vitamin D Deficiency Amplified By Shortage Of Estrogen - 0 views

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    "Researchers at Johns Hopkins are reporting what is believed to be the first conclusive evidence in men that the long-term ill effects of vitamin D deficiency are amplified by lower levels of the key sex hormone estrogen, but not testosterone.

    In a national study in 1010 men, to be presented Nov. 15 at the American Heart Association's (AHA) annual Scientific Sessions in Orlando, researchers say the new findings build on previous studies showing that deficiencies in vitamin D and low levels of estrogen, found naturally in differing amounts in men and women, were independent risk factors for hardened and narrowed arteries and weakened bones. Vitamin D is an essential part to keeping the body healthy, and can be obtained from fortified foods, such as milk and cereals, and by exposure to sunlight.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Shows Heart Benefits in Study - Well Blog - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    "A new study suggests many Americans aren't getting anywhere nearly enough of the vitamin, and it may be affecting their heart health.

    In the study, researchers looked at tens of thousands of healthy adults 50 and older whose vitamin D levels had been measured during routine checkups. A majority, they found, were deficient in the vitamin. About two-thirds had less vitamin D in their bloodstreams than the authors considered healthy, and many were extremely deficient.

    Less than two years later, the researchers found, those who had extremely low levels of the vitamin were almost twice as likely to have died or suffered a stroke than those with adequate amounts. They also had more coronary artery disease and were twice as likely to have developed heart failure.

    The findings, which are being presented today at an American Heart Association conference in Orlando, don't prove that lack of vitamin D causes heart disease; they only suggest a link between the two. "
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