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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Keri-Lee Beasley

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Using New Technology to Rediscover Traditional Ways of Learning | Edutopia - 0 views

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    Mobile tech helps us reconnect with traditional ways of learning:
    Oral storytelling
    Visual literacy
    Gestures, dance & the body
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How to Make Professional Looking iPad Screenshots | Jonathan Wylie: Instructional Techn... - 0 views

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    Some good tips here for iPad frames and apps to find and manage screenshots
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How to Minimize Digital Classroom Distractions - 0 views

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    Engaging lessons are the best way to ensure students are not distracted. A couple of good tips re expectations too.
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Unconventional Presentation Tips to Wow Your Audience - 0 views

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    How Humour can help your presentations
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Worksheets don't Work: Try Reggio-Inspired Mathematics! | Technology Rich Inquiry Based... - 1 views

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    Some great ideas here on Reggio inspired mathematics
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How Google Is Changing The Way We Think - 0 views

  • According to Small’s research, using a search engine increased activity in the regions of the brain dealing with decision making, complex reasoning and vision. Also, the more-experienced Internet users exhibited more than twice as much brain activity as the less-experienced subjects, leading Small to predict that the more we search, the stronger the brain’s reaction to searching.
  • One influential study, produced by researchers at Columbia, Harvard and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, found that people were less likely to remember a piece of trivia when they had access to the Internet. Instead, they were more likely to remember where the information had been saved.
  • “The Internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory, where information is stored collectively outside ourselves,” the researchers concluded.
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How computers change the way we learn - 0 views

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    "While there's no doubt that information technology can have its downsides for our day-to-day behaviour, there is very little evidence that computers are damaging our brains - any more than writing made us more forgetful. In fact, computers might just make us a bit smarter."
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Focus on Teaching - Jim Knight - 0 views

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    Teacher reflection protocols
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14 Essential Google Search Tips for Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning - 0 views

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    Search tips for google
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Freeplay Music | Welcome | The best music library on the planet! - 0 views

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    Site for free music to use in videos. 
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How to Arrange Presentation Slides Like a Graphic Designer | Visual Learning Center by ... - 1 views

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    Presentation design advice
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Five-Minute Film Festival: Classroom Makeovers to Engage Learners | Edutopia - 0 views

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    Lots of links to posts/videos about classroom setup and design
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Being a Better Online Reader - The New Yorker - 1 views

  • Maybe the decline of deep reading isn’t due to reading skill atrophy but to the need to develop a very different sort of skill, that of teaching yourself to focus your attention. (Interestingly, Coiro found that gamers were often better online readers: they were more comfortable in the medium and better able to stay on task.)
  • no difference in accuracy between students who edited a six-hundred-word paper on the screen and those who worked on paper. Those who edited on-screen did so faster, but their performance didn’t suffer.
  • It wasn’t the screen that disrupted the fuller synthesis of deep reading; it was the allure of multitasking on the Internet and a failure to properly mitigate its impact.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • students performed equally well on a twenty-question multiple-choice comprehension test whether they had read a chapter on-screen or on paper. Given a second test one week later, the two groups’ performances were still indistinguishable.
  • multitasking while reading on a computer or a tablet slowed readers down, but their comprehension remained unaffected.
  • Maybe her letter writers’ students weren’t victims of digitization so much as victims of insufficient training—and insufficient care—in the tools of managing a shifting landscape of reading and thinking.
  • In a new study, the introduction of an interactive annotation component helped improve comprehension and reading strategy use in a group of fifth graders. It turns out that they could read deeply. They just had to be taught how.
  • “We cannot go backwards. As children move more toward an immersion in digital media, we have to figure out ways to read deeply there.”
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    Really interesting information on being a better online reader. The author suggests the following:
    "Maybe the decline of deep reading isn't due to reading skill atrophy but to the need to develop a very different sort of skill, that of teaching yourself to focus your attention. (Interestingly, Coiro found that gamers were often better online readers: they were more comfortable in the medium and better able to stay on task.)"
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20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking - 0 views

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    Great classroom design ideas.
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5 back to school iPad activities - Erintegration - 0 views

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    Some good ideas for getting to know your students using the iPad.
    I like the HaikuDeck idea, and the find someone who... idea.
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