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thinkahol *

People who really identify with their car drive more aggressively, study finds - 0 views

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    The studies found:People who perceive their car as a reflection of their self-identity are more likely to behave aggressively on the road and break the law.People with compulsive tendencies are more likely to drive aggressively with disregard for potential consequences.Increased materialism, or the importance of one's possessions, is linked to increased aggressive driving tendencies.Young people who are in the early stages of forming their self-identity might feel the need to show off their car and driving skills more than others. They may also be overconfident and underestimate the risks involved in reckless driving.Those who admit to aggressive driving also admit to engaging in more incidents of breaking the law.A sense of being under time and pressure leads to more aggressive driving.
thinkahol *

Plants And Animals Moving As Climate Changes, Study Finds - 0 views

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    A new study suggests that plants and animals are moving as the climate changes. Red Orbit reports on research published in the journal Science, showing that as temperatures rise, plants and animals are moving away from the equator and to higher elevations.
thinkahol *

New Autism Study Implicates Environmental Factors - NYTimes.com - 3 views

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    A new study of twins released online on Monday marked an important shift in thinking about the causes of autism.
thinkahol *

BPA-exposed male deer mice are demasculinized and undesirable to females, new study finds - 1 views

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    ScienceDaily (June 27, 2011) - While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration notes "some concern" with the controversial chemical BPA, and many other countries, such as Japan and Canada, have considered BPA product bans, disagreement exists amongst scientists in this field on the effects of BPA in animals and humans. The latest research from the University of Missouri shows that BPA causes male deer mice to become demasculinized and behave more like females in their spatial navigational abilities, leading scientists to conclude that exposure to BPA during human development could be damaging to behavioral and cognitive traits that are unique to each sex and important in reproduction.
thinkahol *

Nuclear radiation affects sex of babies, study suggests - 0 views

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    ScienceDaily (May 27, 2011) - Ionizing radiation is not without danger to human populations. Indeed, exposure to nuclear radiation leads to an increase in male births relative to female births, according to a new study by Hagen Scherb and Kristina Voigt from the Helmholtz Zentrum München.
thinkahol *

Children learn language in moments of insight, not gradually through repeated exposure,... - 2 views

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    ScienceDaily (May 23, 2011) - New research by a team of University of Pennsylvania psychologists is helping to overturn the dominant theory of how children learn their first words, suggesting that it occurs more in moments of insight than gradually through repeated exposure.
thinkahol *

Artificial grammar reveals inborn language sense, study shows - 1 views

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    ScienceDaily (May 13, 2011) - Parents know the unparalleled joy and wonder of hearing a beloved child's first words turn quickly into whole sentences and then babbling paragraphs. But how human children acquire language-which is so complex and has so many variations-remains largely a mystery. Fifty years ago, linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky proposed an answer: Humans are able to learn language so quickly because some knowledge of grammar is hardwired into our brains. In other words, we know some of the most fundamental things about human language unconsciously at birth, without ever being taught.
thinkahol *

Vehicle pollution significantly damages the brain, mouse study suggests - 0 views

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    ScienceDaily (Apr. 13, 2011) - If mice commuted, their brains might find it progressively harder to navigate the maze of Los Angeles freeways. A new study reveals that after short-term exposure to vehicle pollution, mice showed significant brain damage -- including signs associated with memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.
thinkahol *

Evidence lacking for widespread use of costly antipsychotic drugs, study suggests - 0 views

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    ScienceDaily (Jan. 7, 2011) - Many prescriptions for the top-selling class of drugs, known as atypical antipsychotic medications, lack strong evidence that the drugs will actually help, a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and University of Chicago has found. Yet, drugs in this class may cause such serious effects as weight gain, diabetes and heart disease, and cost Americans billions of dollars.
thinkahol *

Retracted autism study an 'elaborate fraud,' British journal finds - CNN.com - 1 views

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    (CNN) -- A now-retracted British study that linked autism to childhood vaccines was an "elaborate fraud" that has done long-lasting damage to public health, a leading medical publication reported Wednesday.
thinkahol *

Men more likely to cheat if they are economically dependent on their female partners, s... - 0 views

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    The more economically dependent a man is on his female partner, the more likely he is to cheat on her, according to new research.
Skeptical Debunker

Naps May Improve Performance Later In The Day : NPR - 0 views

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    "In the study, researchers took two groups of healthy young adults. Each group completed two learning sessions. The difference was that between the first and second sessions, one group got to take a 90-minute nap. The group that got the nap improved in their ability to learn by 10 percent, while the non-napping group did 10 percent worse."
Skeptical Debunker

Research: How you think about your age may affect how you age - 0 views

  • "How old you are matters, but beyond that it's your interpretation that has far-reaching implications for the process of aging," said Markus H. Schafer, a doctoral student in sociology and gerontology who led the study. "So, if you feel old beyond your own chronological years you are probably going to experience a lot of the downsides that we associate with aging.

    "But if you are older and maintain a sense of being younger, then that gives you an edge in maintaining a lot of the abilities you prize."

    Schafer and co-author Tetyana P. Shippee, a Purdue graduate who is a research associate at Purdue's Center on Aging and the Life Course, compared people's chronological age and their subjective age to determine which one has a greater influence on cognitive abilities during older adulthood. Nearly 500 people ages 55-74 were surveyed about aging in 1995 and 2005 as part of the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States.

    In 1995, when people were asked what age do you feel most of the time, the majority identified with being 12 years younger than they actually were.

    "We found that these people who felt young for their age were more likely to have greater confidence about their cognitive abilities a decade later," Schafer said. "Yes, chronological age was important, but the subjective age had a stronger effect.

    "What we are not sure about is what comes first. Does a person's wellness and affect their cognitive abilities or does a person's cognitive ability contribute to their sense of . We are planning to address this in a future study."

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    The saying "You're only as old as you feel" really seems to resonate with older adults, according to research from Purdue University.
Skeptical Debunker

Controversial Studies Trigger Dropoff in Osteoporosis Treatment - 0 views

  • The North American Spine Society and the Society of Interventional Radiology have pointed to flaws in both studies. And earlier studies, published over 15 years, found major benefits to kyphoplasty and a related procedure called .

    "We're missing opportunities for patients to receive a safe and effective treatment that can significantly reduce their pain and disability," said Malamis, an interventional radiologist.

    The procedures are used to treat vertebral compression fractures in patients with osteoporosis and other conditions that result in brittle bones. In a vertebroplasty, an acrylic cement is injected into a fractured vertebra. In a kyphoplasty, a balloon-tipped first is inserted into the fracture. The balloon is inflated to restore the height and shape of the vertebra before the cement is injected.

    Neva Nelson, 74, of Naperville, Ill., said a kyphoplasty that Malamis performed in October, 2009, has greatly reduced her pain in a vertebra in her lower back that she fractured after falling on ice. Before her kyphoplasty, Nelson had to sit on cushions. Walking, and especially standing, were painful. "I had to do something," she said. "I could not go on like that."

    Nelson said that since undergoing her kyphoplasty, "I don't have to worry about my back any more."

    In the controversial studies, patients were randomly assigned to receive a vertebroplasty or a placebo-like "sham" procedure. In the sham procedure, patients received an injection of anesthetic, but no cement.

    However, patients in severe pain are reluctant to enroll in a trial where there's a 50 percent chance of receiving a sham treatment. In one of the studies, researchers had to screen 1,813 patients to enroll just 131 subjects. In the other study, only 78 of 219 eligible patients were enrolled. This low enrollment rate raises the possibility that the patients who did enroll were not representative.

    Patients experience the greatest pain during the first three months after a compression fracture. Thereafter, pain gradually subsides. Thus, a vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty provides the greatest benefit when performed within a week or two of the fracture. But the studies enrolled patients up to 12 months after fractures.

    In addition to reducing pain and disability, a kyphoplasty can reduce the risk of subsequent fractures by improving the angle and height of the spine. The studies evaluated vertebroplasty alone, and did not include the more innovative and very different kyphoplasty procedure.

    Malamis suggests the medical community wait for the results of additional studies now underway before passing final judgment on vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty. In the mean time, he notes that Medicare still covers the procedures.

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    Dr. Angelo Malamis says that 90 percent of his patients who have undergone a treatment called balloon kyphoplasty for vertebral fractures report significant reductions in pain and disability.

    But the number of kyphoplasty referrals Malamis has received from primary care doctors has dropped sharply since two controversial studies were published last year in the New England Journal of Medicine. In findings that have been disputed by two medical societies, researchers reported that a procedure related to kyphoplasty was not significantly better than a placebo-like procedure in reducing pain and disability.
Walid Damouny

Epidemic of student cheating can be cured with changes in classroom goals - 0 views

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    Schools have the ability to drastically reduce cheating among their students - all they need to do is follow the relatively simple and inexpensive solutions suggested by research.
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