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Evan Abbey

Articles: Preparation - 3 views

    • pkmills
       
      This is my most common mistake. I know I tend to cram too much information. I am taking the same source document I used for the first presentation to try to re-do the presentation from scratch
  • Simple does not mean stupid. Frankly, thinking that the notion of simplifying is stupid is just plain, well, “stupid.” Simple can be hard for the presenter, but it will be appreciated by the audience. Simplicity takes more forethought and planning on your part because you have to think very hard about what to include and what can be left out
    • pkmills
       
      Simplifying my presentation will be the smartest but the most difficult thing I have done in a long time.
  • ...41 more annotations...
  • I suggest you start your planning in “analog mode.” That is, rather than diving right into PowerPoint (or Keynote), the best presenters often scratch out their ideas and objectives with a pen and paper. Personally, I use a large whiteboard in my office to sketch out my ideas (when I was at Apple, I had one entire wall turned into a whiteboard!).
    • pkmills
       
      I am looking forward to this step. my sister-in-law quilts and does this step to see what the quilt will look like laid out. I bought sticky notes just for the occasion,
    • aboevers
       
      You could use different colored sticky notes and make your own "quilt"!
  • When building the content of your presentation always put yourself in the shoes of the audience and ask “so what?” Really ask yourself the tough questions throughout the planning process.
    • pkmills
       
      This idea of "so what?" was my a=ha moment. It will probably be the one question to help me determine what is really important.
  • Ten slides.
    • ney4cy
       
      i know this is geared toward a venture capitalist but I think with some minor changes this would be great for a teacher. So much of what we do in education involves all 10 of these topics.
  • Twenty minutes
  • Thirty-point font
    • pkmills
       
      10/20/30 was another a-ha moment for me. I had not heard the 10 slides rule before. I had heard that 20 minutes was the ideal time and 30 point font for projecting. I am looking forward to getting to see if I can make my presentation work
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I actually disagree with this part of Kawasaki's post, though the math works out if you have only 20 minutes (since the general rule of thumb is 1 slide = 2 minutes). I have seen presentations where people use slides that build off one another, which means you are able to click through a series of 10 slides within 30 seconds to illustrate a point. Obviously, these presentations won't follow the 10 slide rule, and they will work fine.
    • chaneline
       
      Maybe that is a good rule to start with, but sometimes it will depend on the purpose of the slide.  For instructional sake, you may have a series of pictures that tell a quick story or give visual examples.  
    • suzdohrer
       
      I am posting on Ollie Iowa, but do not know why Evan's name shows up but mine does not. Am I missing some step? Does it matter? I agree that I had heard about 10 slides before, but I had not heard of the 10-20-30 ratio. It gives me a starting point of reference.
  • always volunteer to go first or last, by the way)
    • dougmay
       
      Always good to make the first or last impression
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Depending on the venue, you DO NOT want to go last. At conferences, for example, people will often leave before the final presentation. When we get stuck with the last presentation at a statewide conference for teachers, we are basically resigned to the fact that we will get 10% of the audience we would have gotten in the first two time slots. After lunch is also really bad. If the venue was for an interview, that might be a different story. My preference, though, would be to go second. The studies I've seen on this say that if a person "knocks it out of the park" early, it presents a hire-able option right away and they tune out to the rest of the interviews. They will give the first two people a chance just for the sake of comparison, but after that, it might not matter how good you are.
    • ney4cy
       
      My hsband speaks quite a bit on sunbstainablity and carbon trading. He always hated when he was scheduled to speak right after lunch. He said the audience was usually not as attentive.
  • If you want your audience to remember your content, then find a way to make it relevant and memorable to them
    • dougmay
       
      Making a connection will invest them.
    • rabraham
       
      Yes! and it will help them remember the important aspects.  Connections are  great way to help it be memorable.
  • When you remove the unknown and reduce anxiety and nervousness, then confidence is something that will naturally take the place of your anxiety.
    • dougmay
       
      I used to have my fifth graders perform Shakespeare memorized on stage. They were always nervous but I would tell them that it is just like we rehearsed over and over again. PREPARATION POWERS PERFORMANCE!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Having one successful presentation does wonders for your confidence. You have memories of what you said and how you said it that connected with the audience, and you can always fall back on those if you feel an audience isn't warmed up to you yet.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I always remind my students that there are two types of nerves: ones for when you're unprepared (the bad kind) and ones for when you're excited (the good kind). If presenters are prepared, then they can use confidence and excitement to connect with the audience.
  • Remember, even if you’ve been asked to share information, rarely is the mere transfer of information a satisfactory objective from the point of view of the audience
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is an interesting point to ponder. I'm finding myself thinking about what I enjoy in a presenter an then thinking about how I present to the students. Am I using the same strategies to get my point across to the students? Sadly, I don't think I am.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a good maxim for all of teaching, not just for presentations. We are here to inspire, guide, coach, and provide feedback more than we are to transfer information, especially in an age where there is so much information and it is readily accessible.
    • chaneline
       
      This point made me think about my presentation coming up.  I was asked to present because of my knowledge base, but I need to go beyond that.  What information does my audience need?  What are they interested in?  The answer to these questions will change and vary based on the audience knowledge level.  
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree.I always presume that I would be wasting peoples time to do anything beyond "just the facts" But when I reflect on some of the more memorable presentations I have attended, I would say that the ones with a connecting theme and story are more engaging and I retan more of the informtion presented. This is an A-ha moment for me.
    • aboevers
       
      I was also about to highlight this sentence and write the same things recorded here.
  • Do not fall into the trap of thinking that in order for your audience to understand anything, you must tell them everything.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Oh how I want to tell the students everything! I'm learning (through this and inquiry learning) that I should leave them curious for more.
    • chaneline
       
      I definitely do not appreciate being dumbed down to during a presentation.  Taking time to do some probing questions will help to know what level of understanding the audience is currently functioning.
  • The brain cares about story.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      While I know this to be true in my own experience sitting through presentations, it also scares me. How am I to come up with a relevant story for every presentation I make? I don't have that many stories, and I'm really not the greatest storyteller. I get it, but this can be stressful in itself!
    • chaneline
       
      When the presenter is a good storyteller, it's magnificent! I marvel at those people that can tell  interesting stories.  It's what I remember from presentations.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I agree that the best presenters are the best storytellers. I've found that my students love stories about me when I was younger. I've started adding in some of my funny childhood pictures to add some personality and connection to the content!
  • Simplicity takes more forethought and planning on your part because you have to think very hard about what to include and what can be left out. What is the essence of your message?
    • rabraham
       
      Keep it simple! By really thinking about and getting right down to the essence of your message, it may save a presentation and not have as many people tune out what is being shared.  These are the things that I take notes on at other presentations, why not just cut to the chase.
  • Cliff Atkinson in his 2005 book, “Beyond Bullet Points,” smartly states that starting to create your presentation in PowerPoint before you have your key points and logical flow first worked out (on paper or a white board in my case) is like a movie director hiring actors and starting to film before there is a script in hand.
    • rabraham
       
      I need to keep this in mind while creating PPts.  In the past, I started at the computer, but I think it would be more effective to write out the flow.
  • Humans have been sharing information aurally and visually far longer than we have been getting information by reading lists. A 2003
    • rabraham
       
      This supports the elimination of bullet points.
  • “In a story, you not only weave a lot of information into the telling but you also arouse your listener’s emotion and energy,” he says.
    • rabraham
       
      I like this idea and need to keep it in mind while putting together presentations.  The information is included, but it is also hooked to an emotion that helps it stay with the audience.
  • “But as a storyteller, you want to position the problems in the foreground and then show how you’ve overcome them,” says McKee. If you tell the story of how you struggled with antagonists, the audience is engaged with you and your material.
    • rabraham
       
      This is essential, especially to educators.  Many people are afraid to do something new because they may fail or have difficulties.  If you share how this happened to you, it helps the audience think of you as a real person rather than someone who got it right the first time...which is not reality most of the time.
  • Twenty minutes
    • rabraham
       
      I usually teach 30 minute classes, so my goal for a longer PPt is usually 15-20 minutes.  If I want to have more discussion, I usually aim for 10-15 minutes.
    • chaneline
       
      For the 50 minute presentation, this is a bogus rule.  People will not be happy with a 20 minute presentation with the rest of the time for discussion.  I would find that very annoying.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I have 40 minute classes... I don't think this is a good or workable rule. My kindergarten-5th grade students would NEVER have 20 minutes of meaningful discussion. I do often add extra gadgets to my presentations: games, videos, music, pictures to keep them focused and not just reading the text the whole time. 
    • vmcgee
       
      Twenty minutes is probably about the right amount of time for a Junior High class.  Go beyond that, and we start going beyond their attention span.
  • he stories and the connections they made with the audience caused these relatively small points to be remembered because emotions such as surprise, sympathy, and empathy were all triggered.
    • chaneline
       
      Isn't this so true!  We all remember those powerful stories and are drawn to them.  It's what connects us all.  If a presentation has this, it must be a winner.
    • aboevers
       
      Good point here! But we do need to remember some of the lesser points as well.
  • we learn best with a narrative structure.
    • dougmay
       
      I keep wondering how to use stories in an educational presentation such as information about the solar system.
    • ney4cy
       
      in a previous course I read about the power of anaarative on retention of information. This was from the work by Eric Jensen.
    • vmcgee
       
      Yes, I think that maybe "Narrative" is a good term to think of.  "Story" makes it difficult to put in terms of factual information that we deal with.  Maybe it would be easier for me to approach this if I think of it in terms of providing a narrative for students with my content.
  • We do not tell a story from memory alone; we do not need to memorize a story that has meaning to us. If it is real, then it is in us
    • dougmay
       
      This is so true in retrospect.
  • find out the age of the oldest person in your audience and divide it by two. That’s your optimal font size.
    • dougmay
       
      This may not work when teaching 12 year olds. HA
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was thinking the same thing! Ok, if my oldest kid could possibly be 14, then the font is 7 - nope! Right now in my elementary art room it could be much smaller. Funny
    • mrswalker_
       
      I have kindergarteners- so I'm guessing 2.5 font isn't what the author means. This article seems more directed at professional presenters rather than elementary teachers. 
    • ney4cy
       
      I would agree. if I were usng this with children I think I would be more likely to stick to larger end of the 30 point max. Yung children need larger font to focus and i would think find it on the slide.
  • The majority of the presentations that I see have text in a ten point font
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I just went to the ISEA's training for Mandatory Reporter. It was a video of an RN taking nonstop for 3 hours and going back and forth to a Powerpoint. It was horrible - her slides were the crayon template - what does that have to do with child abuse - and she crammed lots of words on a slide. One slide that she kept going back to, you couldn't even read it was such tiny print. Death by Powerpoint!
  • EXERCISE If your audience could remember only three things about your presentation,what would you want it to be? (1)__________ (2)__________ (3)__________
    • mrswalker_
       
      This should always be the first step to a presentation. It will help the presenter organizer their ideas around the key points, rather than from beginning to end.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is an excellent idea on how to plan your presentation. A must remember for sure!
  • Your audience needs to see where you are going.
  • Visuals should be big, bold, clear, and easy to see. Allow graphic elements to fill the frame and bleed off the edges. Use visuals in an active way, not a decorative one. Aim to carefully trim back the details. Make your presentation—visuals and narration—participatory.
    • vmcgee
       
      This really goes hand in hand with the focus of our lessons.
  • Contrast is about differences, and we are hardwired to notice differences.
    • vmcgee
       
      In science I think this can be done by emphasizing differences between a correct and an incorrect model.  I have found that students can learn what is correct often by understanding what is incorrect, as long as they understand why this is the case.
  • I guarantee it will make your presentations better because it requires you to find the most salient points and to know how to explain them well.
    • vmcgee
       
      I think that giving ourselves guidelines like this is a good way to force ourselves to make adaptations to the way that we do things.  It all comes back to concentrating on the focus of the lesson.
    • aboevers
       
      I wish all presenters followed these rules!
    • aboevers
       
      But usually students won't read assigned material and you need to present a summary--but this has to change!
  • elevator test. This exercise forces you to “sell” your message in 30-45 seconds
    • aboevers
       
      I do this (but I call it an Elevator Pitch) with my students when they are preparing the Proposal or Problem/Solution paper. They act like they are on "Shark Tank" and sell the idea to the class in a short speech. It is a great way for them to decide what are the most important support points and solidify the topic.
  • storytelling is the key to leadership and communication in business:
  • aim to unite an idea with an emotion
    • aboevers
       
      I see some connections to advertising here. We are creating emotional, logical, and persuasive presentations to "sell" the information we are presenting.
  • If clarity and economy of expression are the goals, it would be hard to find a more perfect medium.”
    • aboevers
       
      This is where power point originated, I suppose!
  • ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.
    • aboevers
       
      Good rules to live by!
  • PowerPoint
  • PowerPoint
  •  
    Articles: Preparation-This is a perfect "motto" to go by when creating presentations that I will begin using. In other readings we've already had, it was mentioned about having ten powerful slides and getting across the main idea, instead of having a long drawn out, boring presentation that doesn't allow the audience to take much away from it in the end. Working with this in mind, that is where the practice of my presentation comes into the picture. If a presentation is practiced well enough, the large font and small amount of text won't matter since will be able to expand the information on the slides.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Articles: Preparation-Whatever you are presenting needs to have a story behind it-somehow-as well as making the story interesting. Most of the time presentations can be given by doing so with personal experiences. Personally, I love hearing about other's personal experiences when it comes to pertaining to my career and their lives, due to the fact that it helps me learn from them. I feel by incorporating into the presentation some personal experience, this allows the presenter to be more comfortable in front of the audience, know their material well, and the audience will remember the presentation. Many presenters do a great job of incorporating comedy into their presentations, which adds to the creativity and helping the audience relate and remember the content.
  •  
    Articles: Preparation-I love the exercise that forces you to "sell" your message in 30-45 seconds. This is a great exercise to test yourself to see if you know your presentation. Would the presenter be able to do this? Would I be able to do this? Do I know my information I need to present? What do I need to do to improve my presentation in order to be able to sell in it such a short amount of time? This exercise would be a great way for my students to run through their presentation with another student as a practice for the actual presentation.
  •  
    Articles: Presentation-There are quite a few that mention font size. I feel this is a problem for many either questioning what size to have, if the size they are using is too large or too small, as well as what actual font to use. I find humor in the comment using the oldest person in the audience and divide by two with that being the font size. Using the 10/20/30 is the way to go to have an effective presentation. This is what I will be using and what part of my expectations will be for my students for any of their presentations to be more effective.
mrswalker_

Articles: Presentation "Awakening" - 11 views

  • if your presentation visuals taken in the aggregate (e.g., your “PowerPoint deck”) can be perfectly and completely understood without your narration, then it begs the question: why are you there?
    • rabraham
       
      I think this is a great summary of the information in this article.  It is also easy to remember.  The PowerPoint should be used as a tool, not the entire message.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      So true. This is one of the big shifts in this class, where you purposefully do not put all your info into your ppt, because that takes their attention off of you.
    • vmcgee
       
      I think this statement is something that I can use when I finish putting together a presentation.  If it is such that it can be understood without my narration, then do I need to take up class time going through it?
    • suzdohrer
       
      Why are you (the presenter) there? Great focal point, as I prepare my next PPT.
    • chaneline
       
      This is a great statement.  I know I get so annoyed when someone just reads off the PP.  I want more.
  • Some stick, and others fade away. Why? What the authors found—and explain simply and brilliantly in their book—is that “sticky” ideas have six key principles in common: simplicity, unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotions, and stories. And yes, these six compress nicely into the acronym SUCCESs.
    • rabraham
       
      This message is better remembered as SUCCESs.  I don't think I would remember the principles as easily otherwise.  Each of them is broken down and explained well in the rest of this article.
    • suzdohrer
       
      The use of acronyms is so helpful to learners, of all ages. I'm pleased that the author took time to share this one, too.
  • Second, make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them. Create slides that demonstrate, with emotional proof, that what you’re saying is true not just accurate.
    • rabraham
       
      I think this is something that needs to be remembered in many presentations.  Why would I listen to a presenter if they are telling me the same thing that is on the screen. I like the idea of making an emotional connection to go along with the message.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Agreed, and as the last article stated, you can't take in the verbal information while you are reading.
  • ...32 more annotations...
    • pkmills
       
      Weird thought: I've turned my thinking on this to include slides of how I would make up slide for the rules.
  • The reason you give a presentation is to make a sale. So make it. Don’t leave without a “yes,” or at the very least, a commitment to a date or to future deliverables.
    • rabraham
       
      I like thinking about a presentation as making a sale.  It gives me the extra challenge that the competitive (one of my top 5 strengths) part of me will take on and want to be successful.
  • What makes some presentations absolutely brilliant and others forgettable? If your goal is to create a presentation that is memorable, then you need to consider how you can craft messages that stick.
    • rabraham
       
      This needs to be in the forefront of my mind when presenting to any crowd.  How can I craft messages that stick?
    • aboevers
       
      I think the real problem is that there are too many words on most power points and this is why we tend to read them to students.
  • the diagram uses a visual modality and the speech uses an auditory modality which should result in greater working memory capacity and better understanding, depending, of course, on what is being presented
  • we all want to be sold
    • aboevers
       
      This is true. We want to be sold an idea by the presenter just like we are drawn to the advertising of products.
    • ney4cy
       
      This true of our students. we are trying to "sell" our learning objective or strategy. I always considered a power point of a anvenue to convay information. Did not consider the emotional side or selling it my students.
    • suzdohrer
       
      In the interest of being "green" is there any problem with posting thePPT on a class website, so students can review the slides online.? If so, then is there more reason to include more substance and words, so the PPT is not simply a presentation matter, but it also is a learning tool.
  • , what’s the key point? What’s the core? Why does (or should) it matter?
    • aboevers
       
      There should be a clear purpose to the presentation and that should be made clear to the audience.
    • dougmay
       
      We use I CAN statements everyday. It is very clear due to the fact it is written on the board. Do we need to be that blatant?
  • you must make them feel something.
    • aboevers
       
      This is a lot like advertising!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      In a large way, presentations are like advertising. You need to persuade the audience to care about your message, and then you also need to communicate that message clearly so that they do not misunderstand. Caring requires an appeal to "logos, pathos, and ethos", meaning you need to connect to their emotions and their sense of being a person.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is especially true in music. Creating connections to personal feelings and the material is key.
  • but for all of us to use the same format
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I'm imagining going to a conference and seeing the same type of Powerpoint over and over again! I don't think I would want to continue going to presentations because the boring factor would be too much for me.
    • ney4cy
       
      I have been witness to something close to this. I was in Las Vegas for a week long PLC Conference and almost every presenter had the same format, slides, clipart. As the week went on I found myself concentrating on the speaker and less on the slides. I fell the message was lost in many presentations.
    • dougmay
       
      I too have been to a seminar like this. We checked out early before the snores started.
    • chaneline
       
      Many people like to come to presentations with a printed out PP, they take notes on them....then recycle them later.  It is a very boring style to have to sit through and I find myself zoning out.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This happened way too often in my college days! Everything looked just the same!
  • Often, people come to a conclusion about your presentation by the time you’re on the second slide.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is a scary thought. You really don't have much time to catch your audience's attention. I would assume, in students this could be even faster!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I think this line is the most important one in the entire article. We really need to do something different and attention grabbing right away, or we've lost them by slide 2.
  • make yourself cue cards
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Seems like going back to the basics. This is what we used to do before powerpoint.
    • chaneline
       
      This is something I am going to do.  I was wondering what the audience would think, but it will help to keep me organized.  In the end, I may not need them much.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I don't use cue cards, but I do use the "notes" component of google slides. It helps me review my talking points before I present, but keeps me from reading from cue cards.
  • Don’t hand out print-outs of your slides
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had always thought this was a good idea. I remember times that I wanted print-outs of a presentation so that I could make notes on them. But, that must be because there are too many words on the slides!
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree, I always tried to get a copy of the presentation. Taking notes on each slide helped me remember the most important ideas. If I try and take notes with the slide it makes no sense to me later. I am not sure how I would do without the handout.
  • mirror the spoken word of the presenter
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This seems to be the problem, presenters who just read what is on the screen. I had a teacher who, before Powerpoint existed, would have his entire lesson written on overheads and would stand and read them. So very boring!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Wow... that's even worse that ppt reading. I thought overheads were expressed domain of "filling out the worksheet as a class"
    • vmcgee
       
      I guess that is what we are trying to focus on - using the presentation as a tool for the audience rather than as a crutch for the presenter.
  • people can not read and listen well at the same time
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had not thought about this, but I do find that if I am reading the powerpoint, I am missing what the presenter is saying. At our last meeting I asked one of our teachers if he could repeat his question because I was reading something and had heard the answers but completely missed what the question was
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I have problems with this as well. Whenever there is a lot of text on the screen and I'm in the audience, I invariably find myself just finishing the passage as the person is moving to the next slide, and I've missed everything that they said.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is enlightening! I thought for sure I was ADD! I am constantly missing the verbal information is I concentrate on the text of the slide. It can become an exhausting task during a lengthy presentation.
    • dougmay
       
      Ditto, I thought that I was reaching all types of learners, but I might have been reaching none. WOW
  • Before you go from analog to digital—taking your ideas from sketches on paper and laying them out in PowerPoint o
    • ney4cy
       
      I think this would be a great way to plan out a presentation. Sometimes you just need to start with good old paper and pencil.
    • vmcgee
       
      Yes, I think this would keep the technology "in check."  The technology is then just a tool to aid what I am trying to present rather than the technology controlling how I do my presentation.
    • chaneline
       
      It occurred to me that the act of using pen and paper in an analog way, makes the activity more active and therefore more exciting for the brain.
  • Speak of concrete images, not of vague notions. Proverbs are good, say the Heath brothers, at reducing abstract concepts to concrete, simple, but powerful (and memorable) language.
    • ney4cy
       
      This speaks to me! I think some presenters try to make their presentations unique which translates into complicated, wordy, unfocused. And yes I amone of them! This makes me think of the old saying "Keep It Simple Stupid!"
    • vmcgee
       
      I guess I knew this, but hadn't really thought about it.  Many times in the past when presenting with PowerPoint I have just stopped mid-talk and allowed my students to copy what was on the screen before I continued speaking.
    • vmcgee
       
      Great point here for educators.  Great idea to think of the presentation in terms of the students' brains.  In the past for me the focus of the presentation has been purely on the content.
  • No more than six words on a slide. EVER.
    • dougmay
       
      Even for educational presentations????? That will mean a lot of slides.
    • chaneline
       
      Not sure this is always entirely possible.  Wouldn't it depend on the presentation and what information needed to get across...I may have to break this rule.
  • No dissolves, spins or other transitions.
    • dougmay
       
      I will have to tell my students this.
  • Unexpectedness
    • dougmay
       
      Is this good for presentations for teaching??
    • suzdohrer
       
      Simplicity and concreteness, yes, but I am less sure that unexpected info helps students.
  • Great ideas and presentations have an element of story to them.
    • dougmay
       
      Once again, I question how to always accomplish this in educational presentations.
    • suzdohrer
       
      Why use note cards, when the PPT has a notes area and then you can print the slides with the notes to read or review.
  • IMPORTANT: Don’t hand out the written stuff at the beginning! If you do, people will read the memo while you’re talking and ignore you. Instead, your goal is to get them to sit back, trust you and take in the emotional and intellectual points of your pr
    • pkmills
       
      I have experienced this first hand. I will work at taking this advice and I know I should have better results than in the past.
  • the modality effect shows that ”working memory can be increased by using dual rather than a single modality.” That is, it is more effective to target both the visual and auditory processors of worki
  • Simplicity. If everything is important, then nothing is important. If everything is a priority, then nothing is a priority. You must be ruthless in your efforts to simplify—not dumb down—your message to its absolute core. We’re not talking about stupid sound bites here. Every idea can be reduced to its essential meaning if you work hard enough. For your presentation, what’s the key point? What’s the core? Why does (or should) it matter?
    • mrswalker_
       
      This will really help students figure out what is most important in their learning. By keeping things simple, it also helps the teacher prioritize what is most important to focus on.
  • Images are one way to have audiences not only understand your point better but also have a more visceral and emotional connection to your idea.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is a great way to connect with young elementary students, especially non-readers or low level readers. 
  • The redundancy effect says that if one form of instruction (such as the spoken word) is intelligible and adequate then providing the same material in another form (such as lines of text on a screen that mimic the words being spoken) are redundant and can actually hurt understanding.
    • chaneline
       
      The redundancy effect is something I hadn't ever thought of but it makes sense.  When something can be read off the screen, our brains kind of turn off the listening part...unless it's novel.
  • PowerPoint as a method. Instead... PowerPoint is a medium
    • aboevers
       
      The word "power" in power point is misleading. There really is no power in it unless you provide it through an active, engaging presentation.
  •  
    I agree this is an important part of the presentation process. Whatever you are presenting about, needs to get to your audience as though you are selling the information, idea, data, etc. Creating interesting, fun, and memorable presentations are more apt to stick with your audience and support what you are presenting-just like marketing!
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  •  
    I've made this mistake before. If you hand out the information beforehand, your audience knows (to some extent) what you are going to talk about. Therefore, you end up not having their full attention and possibly give away the main points of your presentation that would have been your key factors and "selling" points in the presentation that would have kept your audience attentive to you presenting.
  •  
    This is a great point to remember. If they can just read the powerpoint to get this information, the audience may as well leave. I have said this to myself before and need to remember it when doing my own presentation.
  •  
    When giving a presentation, it is important to get your audiences attention by delivering a strong message, however giving too much information and not allowing your audience to use their own imagination, may be an overload to them and therefore not understand what you are trying to say or not have them same emotions, thoughts, and feelings as you (the presenter) does. Give your audience a strong, clean, precise, and factual presentation, and the rest will do what it needs to do for the audience. I do not feel PowerPoint needs to be ditched, but instead cleaned up drastically and presented in a much more professional and effective manner.
  •  
    I agree with the article-I do not think when Garr says "Is it finally time to ditch PowerPoint?" that he means to get rid of it completely. I think that it may be overused at times and/or used incorrectly as there are certain criteria that is better to follow on PowerPoint than what some people are doing. Knowing the maximum information to put onto each slide, the correct information and format, and how it is used as a presentation, as well as the visuals, all makes a difference in its used and overuse.
  •  
    I really like this part of the article. You have to get your message across to your audience-make them feel the same you do about the topic. This sometimes takes a lot of work, but can be accomplished by putting in some time to create a powerful presentation. Putting into your presentation the emotion and feelings that you have will capture your audiences attention and keep them captivated.
dougmay

Articles: Delivery - 0 views

  • The biggest item that separates mediocre presenters from world class ones is the ability to connect with an audience in an honest and exciting way
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I think this is why it is important to use personal experiences to be able to connect with your audience. As I am presenting to my classes, I use at least one or two examples pertaining to their lives that may help them to connect with the information. Sometimes it helps and other times the students may not understand due to the fact that they have not had the exposure of the specific topic. Asking them questions afterwards and having another student give an example usual is where the discussion leads. I fell connection is an important key of successful presentations.
    • rabraham
       
      I agree.  Sometimes, the key to getting my students to remember things from my presentations is the story or tidbit of personal info. that I share.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is so important with my elementary students. In Forest City, we take the approach that elementary is when students learn to love music and middle/high school is when they learn to truly do music. We do music reading basics and theory/history concepts, but my number one goal is to connect with students and make them choose to participate through their lives.
  • First impressions are powerful.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      First impressions are not only important in a job interview, but in presenting as well. That's why I think it is important to have those first slides be attention getting enough that the audience will not want to stop listening.
  • First impressions are powerful
  • ...63 more annotations...
  • impressions are powerfu
  • if you have 30 minutes for your talk, finish in 25 minutes
    • mgoodwin5
       
      The presenter can give more information as a one-on-one basis after the presentation if someone in the audience has questions or would like a clarification, for example. By presenting the most important information, the audience will receive the best presentation. The presenter can also hand out note pages after the presentation for the audience to have the "extras" if they have not written anything down or it may help answer questions. Keeping the presentation interesting, straight to the point, and then done, is a presentation done well.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      With my youngest students I can always tell when I've talked to long. I aim for 10-15 minutes and if I hit 15 or even 20 minutes I've lost at least half of them.
    • mrswalker_
       
      If I would do this, I'd have 5 minutes of unplanned time! I think adding little activities into the presentation (brain breaks, songs to sing, etc) helps kids stay engaged for a longer time!
  • Get closer to your audience by moving away from or in front of the podium
  • Get closer to your audience by moving away from or in front of the podium
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is difficult to do if you do not have a remote and you have to continuously change the slides to the next one. I remember one of my instructors in college tell the class that we should not stay in one spot at the front of the room, then she made us practice it. Realize you can move, which is important for the class and the teacher. If you stay in one spot, it looks as though you are glued to the floor, which obviously you are not. 
    • chaneline
       
      I have heard this before and always like it when the presenter is dynamic.  Bummer I read this today because I have a big presentation tomorrow and was planning to hang out behind the podium.  Now I'll be forced to come out of hiding.  
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I do think having a remote in my room would be good. When I taught computers I actually just used a wireless mouse with a clipboard a lot. It worked great for what I needed at the time.
    • dougmay
       
      People get tied to the podium as a security blanket. They are as exposed behind it.
  • Always remember that the people in your audience get to determine whether your idea spreads or dies. You need them more than they need you. So be humble in your approach. Their desires and goals — and their frustrations and anxieties — should shape everything you present.
  • Always remember that the people in your audience get to determine whether your idea spreads or dies. You need them more than
  • Always remember that the people in your audience get to determine whether your idea spreads or dies. You need them more than they need you. So be humble in your approach. Their desires and goals — and their frustrations and anxieties — should shape everything you present.
  • Always remember that the people in your audience get to determine whether your idea spreads or dies. You need them more than they need you. So be humble in your approach. Their desires and goals — and their frustrations and anxieties — should shape everything you present.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I've never thought as much about this idea until this class, but it really is the audience who is the most important. Regardless of why someone is presenting, the audience will chose if they are interested or not. Their reaction is important to you as you may need to improve your delivery or what you deliver in order to gain their attention. I like the statement of your audience determines whether your idea "spreads or dies". That definitely puts it into perspective to make you think.
    • dougmay
       
      I used to work in retail and I was always told that the company wasn't paying my check but the customer was. This would be the same situation. They determine our success or failure.
  • ways rememb
  • Always remember that the people in your audience get to determine whether your idea spreads or dies. You need them more than they need you. So be humble in your approach. Their desires and goals — and their frustrations and anxieties — should shape everything you present
  • present
  • use images with little or no text on slides
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I really like this. The images are so important as we've discussed in earlier lessons and my goals is to use this tactic as much as possible.
    • dougmay
       
      This is something that will have to be sold to the audience since we are programed the other way.
  • Grab your digital video recorder, deliver your presentation and watch yourself,
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I do not like to watch myself on video (not that many people like to see themselves on video), but many times I'm too critical of myself. Not that there isn't room for improvement, so using a video might be very useful to me (or any presenter). 
  • personal/professional history, etc.
    • rabraham
       
      This is interesting because when I am asked to share about myself (for example when I got a teacher leader position), I tend to keep it short and simple.  I don't know what they actually want to know about me.  That's the information they tend to forget anyway.
  • It is better to have the audience wanting more (of you) than to feel that they have had more than enough.
    • rabraham
       
      This also allows time for questions and discussion before hurrying off to another presentation or class.
  • Remember the “B” key
    • rabraham
       
      This is something new that I did not know about it.  I'm sure it will be very useful knowledge in the future.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I'm really trying to remember if I knew this and just forgot or if I've never been told this - ever! I just went into powerpoint to try it! This is a really handy piece of information!
    • suzdohrer
       
      Ditto. I never knew of this. Great tip I can use immediately.
  • take on a conversational tone
    • rabraham
       
      Including the audience with interactions throughout the presentation will also help it come across as a conversation.  People usually feel less threatened when they feel like they are being talked with rather than talked at.
    • chaneline
       
      I really like this advice! It makes sense to me to have a conversation with the audience.  When I think of it this way it takes some of the pressure off
  • If your presentation has to be long, break it into 10-minute chunks. "At every 10 minutes or so, try to reengage the audience with something different—don't just keep showing slides," he says. Try inserting a short video clip, introduce a quick demonstration, or have another speaker get up and briefly present. "Try to find some way to break up the presentation into manageable chunks of time," he says, "so people don't get too bored."
    • rabraham
       
      This is a great idea to keep everyone engaged and mix up the way the information is presented.
    • chaneline
       
      This tip is great because it uses what we know about the brain and gives a practical tip.  The use of video clips and demonstrations help to break up the presentation and keep it interesting.
    • vmcgee
       
      I think this is especially true when dealing with a younger audience as many of us do.  We have to break things into short chunks.
  • he true professional can always remain cool and in control. Remember, it is your reputation, so always remain gracious even with the most challenging of audiences.
    • chaneline
       
      Courteousness and graciousness go along way.  People expect to be respected and the group dynamic definitely calls for that.  I was at a presentation earlier this year where the presenter forgot her manners.  She started to berated us for not asking questions and participating right off.  She seemed angry at us.  She totally lost the whole group and was very ineffective.  Interestingly, she was a national speaker who was expensive to bring in...I can't believe she has made it this far as a presenter.  
  • Practicing in front of another person or a video camera will help even more, he says. "Most of the great presenters actually rehearse much more extensively than anyone else," he says. "They don't just wing it."
    • chaneline
       
      This makes sense, but sometimes feels silly.  I have gone over my presentation out loud twice (several more in my head).  I am going to do another read through tonight, as the presentation is tomorrow.  Hope it's enough.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I have video taped my lessons many times and I will say that it is always beneficial. I sometimes realize that I forgot to use the correct terminology and instead used an explanation!
  • If you’ve made a sincere effort to look at the world through their eyes
  • less than 20 minutes
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I always aim for short times in front of the class and can always tell when I've gone too long. The class gets restless.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This doesn't really work for my classroom, but my presentations often involve songs they stand up and sing, brain breaks, videos, smart board activities, and more. I think the goal is to not lecture for 20 minutes, but the total presentation can be longer.
    • aboevers
       
      I agree. When you switch it up it makes the students more aware and awake. I like to incorporate activities that allow them to move around every 20 minutes.
  • bullet points are the worst way to learn and impart information
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I can't believe that I had never heard this before! This might be difficult at times. Sometimes I just want to quickly bullet the most important items. 
  • Practice 10 hours for every one hour of the presentation
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      WOW! This is a lot of time to practice! I'm wondering where I am going to find the time!
    • pkmills
       
      While I am not passionate about the subject of Personal Hygiene, I am passionate about presenting the Good Manuafacturing Practices topics and helping the production personnel be passionate about delivering a safe and qaulity product.
  • The audience wants to like you and they will give you a few minutes at the beginning to engage them — don’t miss the opportunity.
    • pkmills
       
      Each year that I do this presentation it gets more personal as I work with and get to know more of the staff each year.
  • Audience attention is greatest at the opening and then again when you say something like “In conclusion….”
    • pkmills
       
      Very true. Most people will remember the first thing you said and the lst thing you said and so it goes...
  • Removing physical barriers between you and the audience will help you build rapport and make a connection.
    • pkmills
       
      I need to work on my boss about getting a hand held remote so that all the speakers can do this.
  • If you press the “B” key while your PowerPoint or Keynote slide is showing, the screen will go blank
    • ney4cy
       
      This is a great tip. Instead of of just pausing on the slide you have projected you can actually create a visual break to go off topic or restate a prevouis topic. Love it!
    • aboevers
       
      Some projectors have a "black screen" key that works well too.
    • pkmills
       
      I did not know that. The "B" key will now be in my arsenal.
  • "When you prepare and rehearse the presentation—out loud, over many hours and many days—you'll come across as much more engaging as a speaker and effortless."
    • pkmills
       
      I do rehearse, I just need to do it more than I have in the past.
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree I need to step up my practice. Of course when you have your whole presentation on the slide you can just read it! Now, I know I will need to be more prepared with what I am saying.
  • "We know through research that 93 percent of the impression you leave on somebody has little to do with content and everything to do with body language and verbal ability—how you talk, sound, look and what you're wearing," Gallo says. "Only about 7 percent of the actual words or content is important."
    • ney4cy
       
      When I think about the best presentations I have been to this rings true. Sometimes I find myself getting preachy when I speak I need to remember this.
    • pkmills
       
      I try to make sure I am comfortable in the clothes that I am wearing and that translates to me being cmfortable presenting.
    • suzdohrer
       
      This is my number one point, learned previously. Having a remote clicker and moving among the students changes the entire dynamic of the class. I need to do this more.
  • presenting to a small group, then you can connect your computer to a large TV (via the s-video line-in). With a TV screen
    • suzdohrer
       
      Great idea for my small classes and seminars. I just ended a class of 6 students, and the screen at the front of the room seemed distant. We sat around a conference table and a smaller setting with a TV monitor would have worked better. Just did not ever think of it.
  • The audience is. It’s in their power to embrace — or reject — your ideas.
  • kinds of resistance
    • suzdohrer
       
      I face multi-tasking, over-burdened and tiredness resistance from the audience of students, commonly. They students have too much on their plates and too many distractions. So, perhaps this falls into practical resistance. There is not always a "reward" like comp time at the end.
  • discuss ideas or concepts
    • suzdohrer
       
      Okay, I am taking this to heart. I believe I have to go on a PowerPoint Bullet DIet.
  • most presenters will spend 99 percent of their time preparing the content and slides, and very little—if any—on understanding and controlling their body language
    • suzdohrer
       
      Oh yeah, of this I am soooo guilty! Another resolution.
  • Today’s projectors are bright enough to allow you to keep many of the lights on.
    • mrswalker_
       
      My classroom has these great dimmer lights so that I can cancel out distractions in the room without leaving the kids in the dark. Too bright of a room overstimulates some of my kids and they don't focus well.
  • Is it physically or geographically difficult for the audience to do what you’re asking?
    • mrswalker_
       
      I have to remember this sometimes, especially when my students are standing/sitting on choral risers!
    • ney4cy
       
      I like this tip. When I speak to parents it would be well forth the effort to let them know we are working together for their child.
    • vmcgee
       
      I agree with this statement, but I think it is because passion leads to (1) energy and (2) greater understanding.  These make for a better presentation.
    • vmcgee
       
      I agree.  As I reflect on my own presentations to my class, it seems that the success or lack thereof that occurs in the first few minutes of a lesson presentation will continue on through the rest of the lesson.
    • vmcgee
       
      I did not know this.  I could definitely use this.
  • Resistance doesn’t have to be a bad thing. In fact, if you prepare for it, you’ll sharpen your presentation and stand a much better chance of winning your audience over.
    • vmcgee
       
      I agree.  In effect, this is "preparing for the worst."  If we are ready for the worst-case scenario to develop, then we can handle whatever comes our way.
  • Unfortunately, people read from their PowerPoint slides much more than they think they do, Gallo notes.
    • vmcgee
       
      I hadn't thought about this before.  It makes perfect sense, and I am sure that I have read from the slides more than I have thought I was doing.
  • One sure way to lose an audience is to turn your back on them.
    • ney4cy
       
      Yes! I confess I did this all the time. Wow. I believe I will enjoy giving presentations after this class. I have learned so much!
  • When audience members ask questions or give comments, you should be gracious and thank them for their input
    • aboevers
       
      This depends on the age of the class as well. I substituted in 7th grade classroom and usually they interrupt for attention on themselves, and not as part of the presentation. However, the lesson could help a lot with the delivery in this case. Focus on the purpose!
  • The audience should be looking at you more than the screen.
    • aboevers
       
      I have to get used to this!
  • try to come up with arguments against your perspective
    • aboevers
       
      I always tell my students to prepare counterarguments when writing a paper, and this is the same thing.
  • So look at things from their perspective
    • aboevers
       
      It is sometimes hard to see things from the perspective of an eighth grader!
  • cram as much information into bullets as humanly possible—making it exceedingly hard for people to read the slides. And then the audience gets bored
    • aboevers
       
      I used to be able to give students my power points so they knew what we discussed in class. Now I will need to include a script that accompanies the power point.
  • they don't even rehearse it
    • aboevers
       
      I usually practice in a mirror.
  • sustain eye contact
    • aboevers
       
      Very important to keep your eyes on students for many reasons!
  • ); voice (don't speak in a monotone voice).
    • aboevers
       
      Also, watch for repetition of words or sounds, like "um" or "ok" or "aaaa". Those are annoying!
  • The first 2-3 minutes of the presentation are the most important.
    • dougmay
       
      I agree, hook them early or lose them.
  • Anticipating resistance forces you to really think about the people you’re presenting to, and that makes it easier to influence them.
    • dougmay
       
      Being proactive and anticipating resistance will allow you to less reactive, which would not be good for a presentation.
dougmay

Articles: Design - 0 views

  • The less clutter you have on your slide, the more powerful your visual message will become.
    • rabraham
       
      This is something that will help transform presentations.  Keeping it simple will ensure the audience stays engaged.
  • Instead of a copy of your PowerPoint slides, it is far better to prepare a written document which highlights your content from the presentation and expands on that content.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a great way to keep the talking points limited.  I think it will be great to use with students who are absent for the lessons too.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was glad to see that they still advise giving a document if the thought is to not give out the slide handouts. This is good for students who are absent.
  • You will be able to notice more extraneous pieces of visual data that can be removed to increase visual clarity and improve communication.
    • rabraham
       
      Slide Sorter view helps you to see the big picture of the entire presentation put together.
  • ...57 more annotations...
  • But including a healthy amount of white space sharpens viewers’ focus by isolating elements.
    • rabraham
       
      This is a key element to remember.
    • dougmay
       
      I wouldn't have thought of this, but this slide looks good. The old thought process was to not have extra space.
  • Highlight the key phrases that you will help you rehearse for your presentation
    • rabraham
       
      This is a good step to simplify what the audiences sees and may keep them interested because they can't simply read the rest of the information.
  • Listeners will get bored very quickly if they are asked to endure slide after slide of animation. For transitions between slides, use no more than two-three different types of transition effects and do not place transition
    • suzdohrer
       
      I've struggled with using animations for transitions and lists. Now I read it may not be worth it. Yeah, back to basics and keep it simple.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I will admit that I never use animations or transitions in any of my presentations. Not even a subtle fade. Not only is it extra junk, but it can add an hour to your development time. The most I do are builds. If I have a slide with an important point that I want to reveal, I will make two copies of the slide, and delete the "revealed" info on the first one. Then when I advance to the next slide, voila, I have a "transition".
    • dougmay
       
      With my students presentations, It sooooo delayed their presentations with all of their animartions and transitions. I, too, kept thinking of these articles.
  • Gill Sans
  • Cut out the extraneous content. Speak to that content when you present
    • suzdohrer
       
      This is when I move the cut text or additional text notes to the "Notes" section of the powerpoint, below the slide shot. Then, I like to print-out the slides to show the notes for my presentation.
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I was thinking that I would be using the notes area much more too. I've even been using it to keep the information of where I got the image on the slide so that I can decide where to add that later.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      For many people, the notes section is really good. If you haven't tried the presenter view within Power Point, it is worth trying. On your computer, you can see your current slide, the next slide coming up, the notes that you have, and a timer/clock. The audience only sees your slide.
    • ney4cy
       
      I have done so few PowerPoints but this was a great tip. I will be checking out my notes section and presenter for sure.
  • The blurred backgrounds set off the stark white illustrations for quick visual processing:
    • suzdohrer
       
      I do not have an artisticy background, but I now think this blurred background image will be a use ful tool.
  • You can achieve this through consistent type styles, color, image treatment, and element placement throughout the slide deck.
    • suzdohrer
       
      Another artistic point of placement and imagery through cohesiveness. I worry that I do not have the natural talent to put this together on my own, but I do see the real difference.
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters use lots of different colors, fonts and backgrounds.  May it's just because they can and they haven't taken this course.  The visual clutter distracts from the content and decreases the cohesiveness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like creating templates using Google Slides to ensure that colors and fonts translate to all of the slides in a deck.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      We kind of pooh-pooh color and design elements in learning, as though it is just pretty-ness. But, it does have a big effect, and it is worth it to improve one's sense of color combination.
  • If you have a detailed handout or publication for the audience to be passed out after your talk, you need not feel compelled to fill your PowerPoint slides with a great deal of text.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      I think this is a great point. The more I'm reading about what should (or is appropriate) be on a slide for the best presentations, it is better to have less, than more.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Do you think the "after" is important? Is it better to pass it out after or before?
    • ney4cy
       
      interesting point.At the presentation I attend Monday afternoon the speaker handed out a document before he started his talk. in a way I liked being able to dot notes or highlight an idea or concept I wanted to review more closely later, but on the other hand it was very distracting to be leafing through the document trying to find the page that matched up with what he was discussing. I guess I would say it is better to wait till after your talk is done.
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is something that we stress to our students, since based on what students will usually do is have many different text fonts and sizes. They tend to use whatever looks best for each slide, instead of having the presentation look more smooth and have a togetherness.
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like using two fonts on slides: one to convey the big idea (title) and another to convey the supporting ideas (text).
    • Evan Abbey
       
      My rule of thumb is no more than two. One for headers, one for text (though I often use the same for each). I use a sans-serif font for my text, and either the same sans-serif font for my headers, or a designer font to communicate a special theme. I never use serif fonts.
    • ney4cy
       
      Okay,Okay no more Comic Sans
  • Use the same font set throughout your entire slide presentation, and use no more than two complementary fonts (e.g., Arial and Arial Bold).
  • Images can be very powerful and effective if used with careful intention.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      This is so true. Many times the image used, is what immediately gets the audiences attention and interest. Images are very powerful. i.e. "A picture is worth a thousand words."
    • mrswalker_
       
      I like the idea of using text over images, but it has to be the right image! This creates one image for students to remember, rather than an idea and an image.
  • Lots of extras actually take away meaning because they become a distraction.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      As goes with the statement, "Less is more." I completely understand that too much can be a distraction for the eye. Too much on a slide, take s away the meaning and I feel it also makes a person wonder what they should focus on, such as what is the most important point I'm supposed to be receiving from this slide?
    • dougmay
       
      Agreed!
  • The first step is admitting that you have a problem
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Many of my slides in my presentations either look like this, or have started out like this. This is exactly what I need to work on! Eliminating some of the bullet points and a lot of text!
  • Depending on your content, you may be able to convert each bullet point into a separate image on one slide or over several slides.
    • mgoodwin5
       
      Here is what I'm going to work towards doing. Since learning about Zen, I realize I'm definitely adding too much to my slides, whether it be text or bullets. By using images, or at least less text and bullets, it appears presentations will be much more appealing and interesting to the audience. I really like the idea of using the images instead of any text at all. Then the presenter (me) will expand on the meaning of the image or what it stands for.
  • Your slides should have plenty of “white space” or “negative space.” Do not feel compelled to fill empty areas on your slide with your logo or other unnecessary graphics or text boxes that do not contribute to better understanding.
    • chaneline
       
      This point has been huge for me.  I really thought I would want to fill up the slide with information, not any more.  I see the power of simplicity of the white or negative space.
    • mrswalker_
       
      This is a great idea- I like the idea of negative space better than white space. My classroom is really bright so light text on a dark background sometimes works better than white.
  • No audience will be excited about a cookie-cutter presentation, and we must therefore shy away from any supporting visuals, such as the ubiquitous PowerPoint Design Template, that suggests your presentation is formulaic or prepackaged.You can make your own background templates which will be more tailored to your needs.
    • chaneline
       
      This lead me to think about use of a white background.  I was so afraid of it because it seemed boring, but with the use of visuals, a white background can be powerful and increase the interest of the slide.
  • Avoid off-the-shelf clip art (though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals).
    • chaneline
       
      Some presenters overuse cartoon type Clipart, maybe because it's easier, that's what they are used to, they are trying to be funny/cute or they haven't learned the power of a visual image/picture within a presentation.  
    • aboevers
       
      I don't think I will be drawing my own art either!
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
    • mrswalker_
       
      Great idea to take it step by step rather than just trying to cut a lot of information at once. 
  • Go through your bullet points and try to highlight the main point of each bullet point. Try to bold only the key parts of each point — limit it to as few words as possible.
  • It is very common for people to “brain dump” all of their ideas or thoughts into “stream of consciousness” bullet points as they create slides.
    • chaneline
       
      I think this happens because you want to make sure that all of the points you feel are important are given to the audience.  It has been one of the most eye opening concepts from this course.  I made note cards for my presentation, rather than putting all of the info on the slide. " Redundancy effect" is powerful!
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      Yes, I had always thought bullet points were a good thing! Oh how wrong I was!
    • ney4cy
       
      I thought bullet points would be superior to long connected text or narrative on a slide. I really felt it was the most effective way to get your message out. Now I have seen the light!
    • vmcgee
       
      Me too.  I have been using bullet points extensively all year.  Google slides makes it very easy to do so...
  • The best slides may have no text at all
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      It is interesting to go to presentations while I'm taking this class. I took the ISEA's mandatory reporter training last week and it was an RN on a video with powerpoint slides for 3 hours. Lots of text, the crayon template and a graph that she kept going back to that you couldn't even read due to tiny font. Death by PowerPoint!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is true. It also is somewhat of a curse. You can get to the point where you can't see any presentation without being critical of it :)
    • vmcgee
       
      Absolutely.  Just today I had to give a presentation to a class on behalf of another teacher.  It had WAY too much text and I had great difficulty keeping the attention of 13 year old students.  I couldn't help but think of this class while presenting.
    • dougmay
       
      In the past, I would have a hard time with no text. My thought was that the slide should do the work. My students did presentations and I kept wanting to critique their slides.
  • Presenters are usually guilty of including too much data in their on-screen charts
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This can be tricky when you really need to get all of the data in the hands of your audience. What to leave out?
    • ney4cy
       
      I guess this is where the analog planning is helpful. Along with the elevator test.
  • though your own sketches & drawings can be a refreshing change if used consistently throughout the visuals)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      I had not thought about the use of your own sketches and drawings. I would be afraid that it would look corny, like the clip art, but I'm also intrigued to try this!
    • ney4cy
       
      It does sound interesting. I think it would nice to try student drawings too when using this if educators or students themselves.
  • The trick becomes finding just the right image(s)
    • bdoudwaukee
       
      This is where I feel that I could take hours second guessing my choice of image, or trying to edit it to work.
    • ney4cy
       
      I agree. I have already been out looking, and I just keep looking and looking. I am hoping it will get easier the more experience I have creating PowerPoints.
    • dougmay
       
      This can seem to take more time than the planning.
  • Use high-quality graphics including photographs.
    • mrswalker_
       
      My students LOVE seeing pictures of themselves in a presentation. I try to use student examples as often as possible to create images for presentations.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This is a great idea! Especially for younger students!
  • But boring an audience with bullet point after bullet point is of little benefit to them
    • aboevers
       
      This reminds me of that first video we watched for this class and the gun image. That has stuck with me and it is all because of the image of the gun!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      I guess this goes to speak of the power of an image.
    • ney4cy
       
      I just sat through a presentation Monday afternoon on PLCs and Short Data Cycle. The presentaer was very engaging but his PowerPoint was not! Too much text and bullets very few images. I found myself critiquing his slides instead of listening to the message!
  • The right color can help persuade and motivate. Studies show that color usage can increase interest and improve learning comprehension and retention
    • aboevers
       
      Color can do so much, like make you feel stronger/weaker, or energize/soothe. That was why they painted our visiting team locker room pink!
  • This looks like they were going for the full-bleed background image effect but just missed
    • aboevers
       
      One of my classrooms has a projector that is slightly to the right and the image bleeds to the white board behind the screen. It is very distracting for me and my students!
  • in your slide deck
    • aboevers
       
      I have recently heard of a presentation set of slides referred to as a deck, but we certainly do not need 52 slides to present!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Well, this depends. Some presenters make one master deck and then "hide" the slides they don't want. For the next preso, they hide different slides. Also, it depends on how you use your slides. If you talk for each slide, then 52 is way to many. But if you are using builds or quick sequences of slides as a substitute for bulleted lists, you can get there pretty quick. My rule of thumb is one slide every two minutes, but I do have one preso with 70 slides in it for a 45 minute preso. It is the exception, not the rule.
    • ney4cy
       
      At a recent in-service the speaker had 3 PowerPoints open he retrieved slides from different presentations based on our dicussion. It made the informtion much more relevant to our school but at the same time created a distraction when he couldn't find a slide and had to flip back and forth.
  • the golden rule of PowerPoint presentations — always do what is right for your audience.
    • aboevers
       
      Shouldn't the rule state, "Present unto others as you would like presented to you?"
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Ha! Hilarious!
  • add unrelated “decorations
    • aboevers
       
      Keep the idea of purpose in mind constantly.
    • ney4cy
       
      This is was my typical slide! ALL bullet points.
    • pkmills
       
      Somehow that simple idea got very lost along the way.
  • “Sorry I missed your presentation. I hear it was great. Can you just send me your PowerPoint slides?” But if they are good slides, they will be of little use without you.
    • pkmills
       
      If someone had said this to me, I would have. Now if they say it to me I still will send them the slides. Ha Ha.
  • You can take your own high-quality photographs with your digital camera,
    • pkmills
       
      I ran into soem object that I need for my presentation that were "iffy" for me in the copyright area, so I decided to take my own pictures instead. I feel great about how it turned out.
  • So make sure your slides pass what I call the glance test: People should be able to comprehend each one in about three seconds
    • pkmills
       
      Love this idea. It's a good way for me to see if I am travelling down the right road.
  • Live long and prosper.
    • pkmills
       
      I found out that "Live long and prosper" was added by Leonard Nimoy for character and was based in his Jewish teachings.
  • By getting out of the Slide View and into the Slide Sorter view, you can see how the logical flow of your presentation is progressing. In this view you may decide to break up one slide into, say, two-three slides so that your presentation has a more natural and logical flow or process.
    • pkmills
       
      I used the sticky notes at the begginnig to check the flow of my presentation. I will use the sorter to check the presentation at the end of the creation process.
  • Try to avoid text-heavy (and sleep inducing) slides like this one
    • vmcgee
       
      I gave a presentation today on behalf of another teacher that was structured much like this slide.  It had too much text and information on it, and I found myself racing to get through it before I lost the attention of my audience.  Afterwards, it completely felt like a waste of time.
  • Not sure what two guys shaking hands in front of a globe has to do with the fertility rate in Japan. Yet even if we were talking about "international partnership" the image is still a cliché.
    • vmcgee
       
      It seems like I have seen some sort of "handshake" image a thousand times.  It is overused and carries no meaning - which I think defeats the purpose of an image in a slide.
  • An audience can’t listen to your presentation and read detailed, text-heavy slides at the same time (not without missing key parts of your message, anyway
    • vmcgee
       
      This is probably the topic that has had the greatest effect on my presentations so far.  I have done about 3 different presentations since this course began, and I am now always concentrating on not having my students read slide material while I talk.
  • Very few audiences enjoy paragraph-length bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I can't think of anybody, let alone a few people.
  • It’s okay to cover details verbally that are not reflected in your bullet points.
    • dougmay
       
      I am having a hard time adjusting to this thought. In the past, I wanted to include everything in the slides. Now I thinking of it more of an outline for me.
  • & contains watermark
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  • ) Image is of poor quality & contains watermark
  • This introduces distracting visual noi
    • dougmay
       
      Why would anyone do this? How could they think that this is ok?
jessicawoods8

Articles: Preparation - 6 views

  • Start with the end in mind
    • kbelland21
       
      I think this is really important. Looking at what we want our students to learn at the end of a lesson is the beginning of lesson planning. Looking at the end goal is the start of presentation planning.
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Yes. What is the outcome. Currently, we ask: What do I want students to know? and we also have to ask: How will I know they got it? In other words, what measuring tool will be used. This can indeed impact your story and the number of "big ideas" you choose to include.
    • Evan Abbey
       
      This makes sense for teachers, since we think this way for educational objectives. But for other speakers, this might be a more novel idea.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Even outside of education, Evan, we should be thinking of the end - what are we trying to accomplish or get across? Otherwise, the presentation would just be a mess....LOL
    • nettiemarie
       
      I think this only makes sense you need to know what you what your students to know in the end and work backwards
  • Who is the audience?
    • Patty Harrell
       
      Great question! And how do I get their attention?
    • tjbudd
       
      Exactly. I never have the same class from semester to semester. Students with different interests, abilities, and backgrounds.
    • pattyharris123
       
      Most of the time, my audience members have been teachers. (I have been an elementary principal.) My teachers want to focus more on getting papers graded, "side barring", and working on plans than listening. (Yes, they have been a challenge.) I need to really hit them with something catchy in order to get their attention! Teachers are hard to deal with. :) (Been there, done that. LOL)
  • If your audience could remember only three things about your presentation,what would you want it to be?
    • kbelland21
       
      This goes back to having the end in mind. What do you want the audience to remember at the end? Great question to ask when planning for your presentation.
    • mnollsch
       
      Yes, a great reminder about how to keep it simple.
    • joyisuful
       
      I always need to think about this before I start planning a presentation and then stick with it.
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      A helpful tip in order to slim down a presentation.
    • jessicawoods8
       
      Important to remember when planning a presentation! 
  • ...56 more annotations...
  • whiteboard in my office to sketch out my ideas
    • kbelland21
       
      This is another great idea. I am a very visual person. This would help me better prepare myself for the presentation.
    • mnollsch
       
      I think sticky notes will work well for me as I like to be able to move things around.  I do this with students as a class activity and it works well.  I think it will work for the planning stage too.
  • audience to remember your content, then find a way to make it more relevant and memorable by strengthening your core message with good, short, stories or examples.
    • kbelland21
       
      I agree. I can recall information if it can be related back to me in some way. Make it relevant to the audience.
  • contrast is one of the most fundamental and important elements to include.
    • kbelland21
       
      Never thought of having contrast in a presentation. Contrast does keep the audiences attention.
  • Do not fall into the trap of thinking that in order for your audience to understand anything, you must tell them everything. Which brings us to the idea of simplicity.
    • mnollsch
       
      I know I do this often.  It's a balancing act to figure out what the primary point of each lesson and yet also provide enough background for students to know the why. I want them to be able to talk about the evidence-base. It's important to recognize that the why can be done in a simple way.
    • joyisuful
       
      I do this as well.  Sometimes I need to let the background information come out as I'm talking and adjust if I feel I need to tell more as I find out their understanding.  Sometimes I give them way too much information when they would understand better if I kept it simple.
  • I draw sample images that I can use to support a particular point, say, a pie chart here, a photo there, perhaps a line graph in this section and so on
    • mnollsch
       
      In the past I have planned my words first and the visuals were added later to break up my words. So I wasn't really looking at the presentation as a whole.  This is definitely a new and better way of planning!
    • Kristina Dvorak
       
      This seems like it would be second nature to me, but I need to include more of this.  I use lots of visual examples, but this is different...using visuals to make points (rather than lots of bullets of information).
  • so what
    • mnollsch
       
      "So What?" Great question.  I want students to know some content in order to apply it to their own teaching and interactions with children.  If I am just giving them facts without asking the "So What? or So that?" question I might be overloading them.  This could help me learn to simplify
  • In a story, you not only weave a lot of information into the telling but you also arouse your listener’s emotion and energy,” he says.
    • mnollsch
       
      Weaving the facts into the story or connecting the facts back to the story will help them stick.
  • udiences tend to forget lists and bullet points, but stories come naturally to us;
    • mnollsch
       
      I know stories work when I see students use the stories or examples when they answer essay exam questions!  The story makes the concept stick.
    • joyisuful
       
      Bullet points only make us think we need to take notes and memorize.  We rush to get them all down and don't pay attention to what is being said.  Stories help us remember!
    • we4nails
       
      I often find that with bullets, now that most people will send you the outline or hand it to you, that I just start making a to-do list with (look over this later) as one of them!
    • Evan Abbey
       
      Some times I think bullets get a bad rap with Garr. I like them in many situations. But, they tend to be a crutch more than a tool in presentations.
  • Kamishibai is a form of visual and participatory storytelling that combines the use of hand-drawn visuals with the engaging narration of a live presenter. K