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Contents contributed and discussions participated by J.Randolph Radney

J.Randolph Radney

creative uses of moodle modules - Google Slides - 3 views

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    This is an interesting survey of how certain Moodle tools might be used in classes.
J.Randolph Radney

Ten Tips for More Efficient and Effective Grading Practices | Faculty Focus - 2 views

  • Bank Comments: Keep a bank of comments about frequent errors students make and organize them in groups for easy access. Consider grouping comments according to module, assignment, and chapter, or grammar, content, and organization. For example, if an instructor sees frequent errors regarding point of view, keep related comments grouped in the same area to access them easily.
  • Less is More: Instructors should avoid the temptation to respond to everything that calls for adjustments or changes. Brookhart (2011) reports, many struggling students need to focus on just a few areas or even one item at a time. If a student backs off from his or her paper because he or she is intimidated by the number of instructor comments, then all is lost. It is better to target two or three areas that need to be addressed for the student’s success on future papers.
  • Questions for Reflection: Consider inviting reflective, critical thinking and further conversation in a productive, scholarly exchange with the student. Instead of telling students what they did “wrong,” ask them to rethink their approach. For example, consider using a phrase such as “What is the most interesting aspect of your essay?” Or “What would draw your attention to this topic, as a reader?” This way, the student is not only prompted to make more thoughtful revisions, but also is given tools to use when considering how to write a hook for future essays.
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  • Douglas B. Reeves, author and educator, said, “Technology sometimes encourages people to confuse busyness with effectiveness” (Reeves, 2010). Instructors sometimes equate certain grading practices such as an authoritative tone, strong criticism, or copious comments with being effective. In fact, the more conscious and deliberate an instructor is when delivering feedback, the better that feedback tends to be. Instructors often feel as though they must sacrifice effectiveness for efficiency, or efficiency for effectiveness. By honoring these guiding principles, instructors will realize that they do not need to make a choice between the two.
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    Standard approaches to evaluation of work, but with a few nice (and new) ideas.
J.Randolph Radney

Instructions Not Included | Popular Science - 0 views

  • the transition from physical manuals to embedded help has been slow, steady, and apparently benign, like the proverbial tide that lifts all boats—who would argue against help after all?
    • J.Randolph Radney
       
      What if university instruction were re-imagined in such a way: Provide just-in-time help for skills on the job in order to address needs at the time they occur?
J.Randolph Radney

Community Toolkit | Community - 1 views

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    This is the actual community toolkit website.
J.Randolph Radney

A Must Have Google Drive App for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning - 2 views

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    For those who want to grade Google Drive submissions online
J.Randolph Radney

This is How to Grade Students Work on Google Drive ~ Educational Technology and Mobile ... - 2 views

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    For those who want to grade Google Drive submissions online
J.Randolph Radney

The Lesser Kudos - Lingua Franca - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 1 views

  • I’ve sometimes wondered if the visual similarity between kudus and kudos contributed to a belief that a kudo was a shy and retiring noun best observed in the plural.
    • J.Randolph Radney
       
      I love his humour!
J.Randolph Radney

Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education | Association of College... - 2 views

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    The Association of College and Research Libraries has developed a site discussing information literacy standards for education.
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