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BBC News - NatWest online services hit by cyber attack - 0 views

  • ails safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6");
  • Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); hyper-depth-st
  • 's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); Your Savings
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  • and cash machines. Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&amp;A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&amp;A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&amp;A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); <h4 cla
  • It came less than a week after a major computer failure left some customers unable to use cards and cash machines.
  • On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website
  • Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today,
dr tech

Kevin Kelly on the future of the Internet in China / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "There are three big challenges in the Internet space that all countries must face in the near future. China's approach to the challenges will impact not only Chinese Internet users, but potentially all Internet users. What interface follows the smart hone, whether it be AR-enabled glasses, foldable screens, or wearable projectors, will not only be influenced by China's substantial Internet-using population, but also by their manufacturing. Privacy, as it relates to online information collecting and sale, has consequences for broader community standards, and there is no one-size fits all approach to this issue. China must engage their own ethicists, community, government and technologists to develop a solution that works for China. Finally, globalization. Most of China's internet success has been within China, but as China begins to consider how it might attract users from outside its borders, it will need to consider dialing back the protections that have held foreign Internet companies at bay."
dr tech

The internet is the answer to all the questions of our time | Technology | The Guardian - 1 views

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    "The questions of the day are "How do we save the planet from the climate crisis?" and "What do we do about misogyny, racial profiling and police violence, and homophobic laws?" and "How do we check mass surveillance and the widening power of the state?" and "How do we bring down autocratic, human-rights-abusing regimes without leaving behind chaos and tragedy?" Those are the questions. But the internet is the answer. If you propose to fix any of these things without using the internet, you're not being serious. And if you want to free the internet to use in all those fights, there's a quarter century's worth of Internet Utopians who've got your back."
dr tech

Flicking the kill switch: governments embrace internet shutdowns as a form of control |... - 0 views

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    "Internet shutdowns are not just used by governments facing civil unrest. Every year millions of internet users from Sudan to Syria, Jordan to India also lose internet access during exam season as governments pull the plug in a bid to avoid hi-tech cheating."
dr tech

Record number of countries enforced internet shutdowns in 2022 - report | Global develo... - 0 views

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    "A record number of countries switched off access to internet services in response to political upheaval last year, causing "incalculable and persistent damage to people's lives", according to a new report. The research by internet rights group Access Now and the #KeepItOn coalition documents 187 shutdowns in 2022. These were introduced by governments in 35 countries - the highest number in a single year since the groups began documenting internet blackouts in 2016."
dr tech

Grinding our bums, flashing our boobs: the internet is making juveniles of us all | Mar... - 0 views

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    "How to summarise, then, the personality changes that the internet brings out in us? Tribalism, bullying, the wildfire spread of "crazes", "instant gratification culture", the triumph of the temper tantrum: future anthropologists might observe that the behaviour of adults online very much resembles that of children offline. I am often amazed at the rational common sense of those who don't bother with social media, when asked about some topic tearing the internet apart. Online, there is a level of adult sophistication that simply seems beyond us. Some call the internet a town square, some a wild west. In fact, it's a playground."
dr tech

Iraq shuts down the internet to stop pupils cheating in exams | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The blackouts coincided with exams for secondary and high-school students and were implemented as the ultimate step in the country's battle to stop students cheating using smuggled mobile phones and internet-connected devices in exam halls. While attempting to ban mobile phones from exams or setting up local jamming equipment might be a less draconian measure, shutting off the internet is undoubtedly efficient. However, the outage impacted every person and business in the parts of the country controlled by the Iraqi government, causing human rights campaigners, including Access Now, to condemn the move."
dr tech

Is technology bad for us? | Eva Wiseman | Life and style | The Observer - 0 views

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    "So instead of switching off the internet, the conversation should be about how to change it. How to clarify what we're giving for what we take. And the responsibility should not be with young people, in their WiFi-reliant worlds - it should be with the massive corporations that profit from them. As with cigarette packets (their photos of messy lungs a stark reminder of the choice you're making), so should the internet be required to advertise its risks, to alert you to where your data is being held. Because this is not just somewhere we play. The internet is where we live."
dr tech

Vietnam criticised for 'totalitarian' law banning online criticism of government | Worl... - 1 views

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    "Vietnam has introduced a new cybersecurity law, which criminalises criticising the government online and forces internet providers to give authorities' user data when requested, sparking claims of a "totalitarian" crackdown on dissent. The law, which mirrors China's draconian internet rules, came into effect on 1 January and forces internet providers to censor content deemed "toxic" by the ruling communist government. Vietnam's ministry of public security said it will tackle "hostile and reactionary forces", but human rights groups said it was authorities' latest method of silencing free speech."
dr tech

'Remember the Internet': An Encyclopedia of Online Life - The Atlantic - 0 views

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    "At the same time, the internet is constantly disappearing. It's a world of broken links and missing files-often because the people in charge cast things off on a whim. In 2019, MySpace lost 50 million music files and apologized for "the inconvenience." Around the same time, Flickr started deleting photos at random. Even though many of Vine's most unnerving or charming or "iconic" six-second videos have been preserved, its community was shattered when the platform was shut down. It doesn't help that the internet has no attention span and no loyalty: What isn't erased or deleted can still be quickly forgotten, buried under a pile of new platforms, new subcultures, and new joke formats. The feed refreshes, and so does the entire topography of the web."
dr tech

ICANN was hacked, but critical data was protected - 0 views

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    "Hackers breached the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization that coordinates unique web addresses all across the world, but luckily didn't hit the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, an important leg that keeps the Internet running smoothly. Attackers used "spear fishing" to break into the system in late November, according to a post on ICANN's website this week. Staffers received email messages that appeared to be coming from ICANN's own domain; several ICANN staffers' emails were compromised."
dr tech

The malware that's pwning the Internet of Things is terrifyingly amateurish / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "If mediocre malware can power some of the largest DDoS attacks ever, and considering the sad state of security of the Internet of Things in general, we should probably brace for more cyberattacks powered by our easy-to-hack "smart" Internet of Things, as many, including ourselves, had predicted months ago."
dr tech

Google Unveils Plan to Demolish the Journalism Industry Using AI - 0 views

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    "At first glance, the change might seem relatively benign. Often, all folks surfing the web want is a quick-hit summary or snippet of something anyway. But it's not unfair to say that Google, which in April, according to data from SimilarWeb, hosted roughly 91 percent of all search traffic, is somewhat synonymous with, well, the internet. And the internet isn't just some ethereal, predetermined thing, as natural water or air. The internet is a marketplace, and Google is its kingmaker. As such, the demo raises an extremely important question for the future of the already-ravaged journalism industry: if Google's AI is going to mulch up original work and provide a distilled version of it to users at scale, without ever connecting them to the original work, how will publishers continue to monetize their work?"
dr tech

The Internet of Things: How It's Changing Cars - 0 views

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    "As with most items and products that are re-engineered with the Internet of Things (IoT), they become even more powerful and useful in our daily lives. With the Internet of Things becoming an integral part of many industries, let's explore how this technology is changing the design and function of modern vehicles."
dr tech

Is my phone listening to me? My story of the internet reading my mind. - 0 views

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    "W hat What do I mean when I say the internet is reading my mind? I don't mean simply that it collects my data and observes patterns and interacts with me by reconfiguring that data in ways designed to engage me. I'm not talking only about targeted ads; as they have become increasingly sophisticated, my sense of failure when I succumb to them has morphed into something more like begrudging respect. You got me, internet. I bought those Instagram jogging pants. I am no different from every other playable bundle of synapses holding a phone."
dr tech

Much of west and central Africa without internet after undersea cable failures | Intern... - 0 views

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    "Much of west and central Africa has been left without internet service, as operators of several subsea cables reported failures. The cause of the cable failures on Thursday was not immediately clear. The African subsea cable operator Seacom confirmed that services on its west African cable system were down and that customers who relied on that cable were being redirected to the Google Equiano cable, which Seacom uses."
dr tech

Internet slows down after DNS attack on Spamhaus | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    Who said you could not bring the internet down?
dr tech

Internet anonymity is the height of chic | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "In this age of information overload, internet exhibitionism and NSA snooping, is it possible to make yourself unGoogleable? And does it earn you added credibility, as fashion designer Phoebe Philo and bands such as !!! suggest?"
dr tech

Are There Countries Whose Situations Worsened with the Arrival of the Internet? - 0 views

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    "There are concerning stories of censorship and surveillance coming from many countries. Have the stories added up to dramatic authoritarian tendencies, or do they cancel out the benefits of having more and more civic engagement over digital media? Fancier graphic design might help bring home the punchline. There are still no good examples of countries with rapidly growing internet populations and increasingly authoritarian governments."
dr tech

Google, democracy and the truth about internet search | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Are Jews evil? How do you want that question answered? This is our internet. Not Google's. Not Facebook's. Not rightwing propagandists. And we're the only ones who can reclaim it."
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