Skip to main content

Home/ History with Holman/ Group items tagged Quest4

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Garth Holman

Middle Ages History - YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    What to watch the BBC TV Show called "Medieval Life" Hosted by Terry Jones (Monty Python) Each show focuses on the life of one type of person in the middle ages: Peasant, Monk, Knight, Noble, Outlaw, Jester, etc.. Well worth the time. Enjoy.
Garth Holman

Steps to Knighthood - 1 views

  •  
    Learn the Steps to becoming a Knight.
Garth Holman

Middle Ages History - YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    What to watch the BBC TV Show called "Medieval Life" Hosted by Terry Jones (Monty Python) Each show focuses on the life of one type of person in the middle ages: Peasant, Monk, Knight, Noble, Outlaw, Jester, etc.. Well worth the time. Enjoy.
Garth Holman

Medieval education in Europe: Schools & Universities - 0 views

  • It is estimated that by 1330, only 5% of the total population of Europe received any sort of education
  • Even then education, as we understand it, was not accessible or even desired by everyone. Schools were mostly only accessible to the sons of high lords of the land.
  • In most kingdoms in Europe, education was overseen by the church.
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • The very fact that the curriculum was structured by the church gave it the ability to mould the students to follow its doctrine
  • Unofficially, education started from a very young age. This sort of early education depended on the feudal class of the child’s parents
  • Even the children of serfs would be taught the skills needed to survive by their parents. The boys would be taken out into the fields to observe and to help their parents with easy tasks, while the girls would work with the animals at home, in the vegetable garden with their mothers, or watch them weave.
  • Children of craftsmen and merchants were educated from a very young age in the trade of their fathers. Trade secrets rarely left a family and they had to be taught and understood by all male (and unusually, female) heirs, in order to continue the family legacy.
  • Young boys of noble birth would learn how to hunt and swing a weapon, while the young ladies of nobility would learn how to cook
  • The main subject of study in those schools was Latin (reading and writing). In addition to this, students were also taught rhetoric – the art of public speaking and persuasion – which was a very useful tool for both men of the cloth and nobles alike.
  • Lessons frequently started at sunrise and finished at sunset
  • University education, across the whole of the continent, was a luxury to which only the wealthiest and brightest could ever aspire
  • Since the creation of the first university in 1088
  • Students attended the Medieval University at different ages, ranging from 14 (if they were attending Oxford or Paris to study the Arts) to their 30s (if they were studying Law in Bologna)
  • The dynamic between students and teachers in a medieval university was significantly different from today. In the University of Bologna students hired and fired teachers by consensus. The students also bargained as a collective regarding fees, and threatened teachers with strikes if their demands were not met
  • A Master of Arts degree in the medieval education system would have taken six years; a Bachelor of Arts degree would be awarded after completing the third or fourth year. By “Arts” the degree was referring to the seven liberal arts – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric
  • The sons of the peasants could only be educated if the lord of the manor had given his permission
  • Any family caught having a son educated without permission was heavily fined
  • Historians today believe that this policy was another way in which authority figures attempted to control the peasants, since an educated peasant/villein might prove to question the way things were done and upset the balance of power which kept the nobles strong.
  • Students held the legal status of clerics which, according to the Canon Law, could not be held by women; women were therefore not admitted into universities.
  •  
    This explains the importance of education and how each group got an education.
Garth Holman

BBC News | Health | A millennium of health improvement - 0 views

  • In the medieval world, there was a belief that only miracles were so powerful
  • full and healthy life for men was making it through early childhood. For women, it was making it past childbearing age.
  • boy had reached 20 he could hope to live to 45, and if he made it to 30 he had a good chance of making it into his fifties.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • main threats lay in early childhood, as the child's immune system was coming to terms with the threats posed by a disease-ridden environment.
  • Thatch roofs were common in the countryside (where 85-90% of the population lived) and they attracted insects and rodents
    • Garth Holman
       
      Thatching is the craft of building a roof with dry vegetation such as straw, water reed, sedge (Cladium mariscus), rushes, or heather, layering the vegetation so as to shed water away from the inner roof. It is a very old roofing method and has been used in both tropical and temperate climates. See images:  https://www.google.com/search?q=Thatch+roofs&safe=strict&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjttJ-5su3KAhXDzoMKHXb_D-EQ_AUIBygB&biw=1374&bih=676&dpr=0.9
  • They carried bacteria, which they deposited either on the inhabitants or the food they would eat
  • There was no plumbing, so human waste was deposited outside - but not too far from - the house. Such material produced a breeding ground for the biggest killers of the period, cholera and typhoid, which were caused by unsanitary living conditions.
  • body lice living on infected people.
  • increased risk of death as a result of accidents at work.
  • It was noblemen who were most successful at keeping themselves clean, and they surrounded themselves with well-scrubbed servants.
  • But between the ages of 14 and 40 - the years of having children - a woman's life expectancy was half that of a man's.
  • One reason offered for this is that having babies in the middle ages was more dangerous than going to war
  • less sanitary, and put the mother at a high risk of fatal infection.
  • Food storage was also primitive, with no refrigeration except in winter, and consumers showed a tolerance of slightly rancid goods because there was a general shortage of food.
  • while relatives of the afflicted prayed for miracles.
Garth Holman

Diseases during the Middle Ages - 1 views

  • Rough wool worn close to the skin by peasants led to numerous and widespread skin diseases.
  • Scarcity of fruits, vegetables and proteins needed for a healthy diet led to maladies of the intestinal tract and scurvy.
  • Winter was especially hard on medieval society, as cold, drafty dwellings led to numerous cases of deadly pneumonia.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • improper sanitation
    • Garth Holman
       
      As you will see, human waste was dumped on the streets, out windows, or from the roof of buildings or castles.  Image walking under that. 
  • Mental illness was also widespread during the Middle Ages. Injuries received to babies during the birthing process often led to brain trauma.
  • Leprosy remained the most feared disease of the Middle Ages,
    • Garth Holman
       
      Leprosy:  is a chronic infection caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis   Can be seen on the skin, deforms head, hands and feet. 
  •  
    Diseases of the Middle Ages: How do we deal with them? 
  •  
    Diseases of the Middle Ages: How do we deal with them? 
Garth Holman

Medicine - 1 views

  • Arabic anatomical and pharmaceutical knowledge, far greater in scope than that of medieval Europe's learning, was quickly assimilated
  • Isolation of the sick and contagious was commonplace and possibly the greatest step taken in medieval medicine.
  • Hospitals began to be built in Europe during the 13th century
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Bleeding and the use of leeches to draw "bad blood" from the patient were typical. Some surgeries were performed to cure patients of hernias, cataracts, for the removal of gallstones. Surgery was often more precarious than the actual problem. Folk cures and poultices made from herbs were options for the peasant class. There were those who would risk being called "witch" to provide these remedies, although many found themselves tied to a burning stake.
  • the Church was often called to exorcise demons and say prayers and incantations over the patient.
    • Garth Holman
       
      When all else fails turn to the Church! 
  •  
    Medicine, no aspirin for a headache, lets try blood letting:)
  •  
    Medicine, no aspirin for a headache, lets try blood letting:)
  •  
    Medicine, no aspirin for a headache, lets try blood letting:)
Garth Holman

Castles in Medieval Times - 0 views

  •      Large stone castles were built in Europe from about the 1100’s to about the 1500’s. These huge buildings served not only to defend the country from foreign invaders but as the basic tool in preserving the king’s and the nobles’ power over the land. The social system was very rigid in the Middle Ages.
  • Under Feudalism, the basic social structure in this time, all land was held by the king. The king gave pieces of this land to various high nobles, in return for their help in fighting his wars or in putting down rebellions. Not only did the higher nobles have to fight for the king themselves, they had to supply a certain number of lesser lords and other knights to help fight also. These higher nobles then gave some of their land to lesser knights, in return for their help in battle. Below all the knights were the serfs, who actually farmed the land. They gave a portion of their crops each year to the lord who ruled over them, in return for use of the land and protection.
  • castles as symbols of their power for all to see.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • A man’s son inherited his lands and his obligations to fight
  • The castle was both a residence for the lord and his family, and a fortification. It was a strong place for the lord to defend himself against his enemies (and the king’s enemies, and his overlord’s enemies), a safe place for him and his knights to return to, and a place to live which emphasized his power.
  •   Castles were built to keep out enemies. When an attack was expected, the drawbridge was raised, the gates and portcullis were closed, and archers were stationed on the towers.
  • The walls were not only high, in a well-planned castle, but they were arranged as much as possible so that anyone climbing the walls could be shot at from two directions.
  • The castle’s defenses invited a great deal of ingenuity from the attackers. Rolling wooden towers, covered with thick hides to stop arrows and kept wet so they could not be set on fire, were brought up to the walls in an attack. Sometimes they even worked. Catapults threw heavy stones at the walls to make a breach or loads of rocks (or diseased livestock, or fire bombs) over the walls. The battering ram—generally used against a door—was an old favorite.
  • he knights and their servants and their mounts all had to eat, as did the lord, his family, and his servants and officials, and their families. Many castles grew certain types of food inside their walls, to add variety to the diet of those inside the castle, but it was not nearly enough to feed the people in the castle, much less their guests. Castles might have beehives, herb gardens, fruit trees or a fishpond. Because the land inside the castle walls was not enough to feed all these people, they got their food from the peasants who farmed outside, and from hunting. There were restrictions on hunting by the peasants, and sometimes it was forbidden entirely, so that the lord and his retainers would have plenty of game to hunt. Hunting was also a major recreation for the lord and his men.
Garth Holman

Middle Ages for Kids: A Knight's Armor and Weapons - 0 views

  •  
    What a knight wore and his weapons.
Garth Holman

Awesome Stories - 0 views

  •  
    Stories about many parts of life during the middle ages: Torture, armor, confessional, Josting, knights, etc...
Garth Holman

Medieval Food - 0 views

  • Medieval foods and diets depended much on the class of the individual.
  • Fowl such as capons, geese, larks, and chickens were usually available to the lord and his family. They would also dine on other meats; beef, bacon, lamb, and those living close to water may have regularly dined on salmon, herring, eels ands other fresh water fish. Fish would either be sold fresh or smoked and salted. Wealthy society could afford large quantities of milled flour and other meals made from grain. Dairy products such as cheese and butter could be seen on the manor table.
  • Most of the wheat they harvested went exclusively to the market, and peasant breads were made from barley and rye, baked into dark heavy loaves. Ales made from barley would quaff the thirst, as would water drawn from the well, sweetened with honey. Peasant society got what little proteins they could from peas and beans that would be added to bread and pottage.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Onions, cabbage, garlic, nuts, berries, leeks, spinach, parsley were some of the foods that would combined to make thick soup. Raw vegetables were considered unhealthy and rarely eaten, but anything that could grown, with the exception of known poisonous plants, were added to the mix.
Garth Holman

Medieval Times - 0 views

  • women didn't even know the man before they wed.
  • ometimes able to choose their bride. Marriage back then was not based on love; most marriages were political arrangements.
  • The arrangement of marriage was done by the children's parents. In the middle ages, children were married at a young age. Girls were as young as 12 when they married, and boys as young as 17. The arrangement of the marriage was based on monetary worth. The family of the girl who was to be married gives a dowry, or donation, to the boy she is to marry. The dowry goes with her at the time of the marriage and stays with the boy forever.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • posted on the door of the church. The notice was put up to ensure that there were no grounds for prohibiting the marriage.
  • There were several reasons for prohibiting a marriage. One reason was consanguinity, meaning the couple was too closely related. If the boy or the girl had taken a monastic or religious vow, the marriage was than also prohibited. Other reasons that prohibited marriage, but were not grounds for a divorce, were rape, adultery and incest. A couple could also not be married during a time of fasting, such as lent or advent, and a couple not be married by someone who had killed someone.
Garth Holman

LAW IN THE MIDDLE AGES - 3 views

  •  
    Trial by battles, ordeals and the Courts (church, manor and royal) 
Angela W

The Middle Ages - 2 views

  •  
    Great info on what life was like and what happened during the middle ages. Good info about travel as well.
Garth Holman

Go Social Studies Go! | europe-in-the-dark-ages - 2 views

  •  
    Great resource for many key ideas we need to know. 
1 - 20 of 44 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page