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Garth Holman

The past, present and future of the bubonic plague - Sharon N. DeWitte - YouTube - 0 views

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    TED Talk EDU for kids animated story of black death
Garth Holman

The Black Death - 0 views

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    Animated game on the Black Death
Garth Holman

Doctor's Review | Doctors of the Black Death - 0 views

  • Public service, plague-style Presumably, their principal task of the plague doctors was to help treat and cure plague victims, and some did give it their best shot. In actual fact, however, the plague doctors’ duties were far more actuarial than medical. Most did a lot more counting than curing, keeping track of the number of casualties and recorded the deaths in log books. Plague doctors were sometimes requested to take part in autopsies, and were often called upon to testify and witness wills and other important documents for the dead and dying. Not surprisingly, many a dishonest doc took advantage of bereaved families, holding out false hope for cures and charging extra fees (even though they were supposed to be paid by the government and not their patients). Then, as now, it seems a life of public service was occasionally at odds with the ambitions of some medically minded entrepreneurs. Whatever their intentions, whatever their failings, plague doctors were thought of as brave and highly valued; some were even kidnapped and held for ransom.
  • Creepy costume By the 1600s, the plague doctor was a terror to behold, thanks to his costume — perhaps the most potent symbol of the Black Death. The protective garment was created by the 17th-century physician Charles de l’Orme (1584-1678). De l’Orme had been the physician of choice for several French kings (one Henri and a Louis or two), and was also a favourite of the Medici family in Italy. In 1619 — as a carefully considered way to protect himself from having to visit powerful, plague-infested patients he couldn’t say no to — de l’Orme created the iconic uniform. Its dramatic flair certainly made it seem like a good idea, and the costume quickly became all the rage among plague doctors throughout Europe. Made of a canvas outer garment coated in wax, as well as waxed leather pants, gloves, boots and hat, the costume became downright scary from the neck up. A dark leather hood and mask were held onto the face with leather bands and gathered tightly at the neck so as to not let in any noxious, plague-causing miasmas that might poison the wearer. Eyeholes were cut into the leather and fitted with glass domes. As if this head-to-toe shroud of foreboding wasn’t enough, from the front protruded a grotesque curved beak designed to hold the fragrant compounds believed to keep “plague air” at bay. Favourite scents included camphor, floral concoctions, mint, cloves, myrrh and basically anything that smelled nice and strong. In some French versions of the costume, compounds were actually set to smolder within the beak, in the hopes that the smoke would add an extra layer of protection. A wooden stick completed the look, which the plague doctor used to lift the clothing and bed sheets of infected patients to get a better look without actually making skin-to-skin contact.
Garth Holman

Effects of the Black Death - How the Black Death Worked | HowStuffWorks - 11 views

    • Garth Holman
       
      How would the peasants that survived the Black Death, react to the huge increase in wages in the cities? 
    • Nitzan Omer
       
      The people that survived were very hurt because they had seen so many people die, but they were also so happy that they were alive.They had a dance Macabre as a dance to talk to people that have died, and they celebrate being alive
    • Arielle Epstein
       
      The pesants who survived the black death, started to have better lives because of the increase in wages. Peasants started to eat nicer foods and made more money from working.
  • The Black Death reared its head sporadically in Europe over the next few centuries.
  • The workforce had been destroyed -- farms were abandoned and buildings crumbled. The price of labor skyrocketed in the face of worker shortage, and the cost of goods rose. The price of food, though, didn't go up, perhaps because the population had declined so much.
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  • The Black Death did set the stage for more modern medicine and spurred changes in public health and hospital management. Frustrated with Black Death diagnoses that revolved around astrology and superstition, educators began placing greater emphasis on clinical medicine, based on physical science.
  • generally suffered a communal crisis of faith.
  • They had turned to the church for an answer to the plague, and the church had been able to offer no help.
  • celebrate being alive.
  • The danse macabre, or dance of death, is an allegorical concept that was expressed in drama, poetry, music and visual art.
  • The range of figures shown is meant to show that death will come for everyone, and the various activities depicted are a reminder that death could always be right around the corner.
Garth Holman

http://edsitement.neh.gov/sites/edsitement.neh.gov/files/Black_Death.swf - 0 views

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    Interactive map that shows spread of the Plague.
John Woodbridge

Backyard Bonanza: Medieval Outhouses and Roman Roads Unearthed - Yahoo News - 0 views

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    Ancient Roman settlement in England found underneath Medieval remains
liat s

The Renaissance: Was it a Thing? - Crash Course World History #22 - YouTube - 0 views

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    Explains a little bit about the Renaissance
Garth Holman

Castles in Medieval Times - 0 views

  •      Large stone castles were built in Europe from about the 1100’s to about the 1500’s. These huge buildings served not only to defend the country from foreign invaders but as the basic tool in preserving the king’s and the nobles’ power over the land. The social system was very rigid in the Middle Ages.
  • Under Feudalism, the basic social structure in this time, all land was held by the king. The king gave pieces of this land to various high nobles, in return for their help in fighting his wars or in putting down rebellions. Not only did the higher nobles have to fight for the king themselves, they had to supply a certain number of lesser lords and other knights to help fight also. These higher nobles then gave some of their land to lesser knights, in return for their help in battle. Below all the knights were the serfs, who actually farmed the land. They gave a portion of their crops each year to the lord who ruled over them, in return for use of the land and protection.
  • castles as symbols of their power for all to see.
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  • A man’s son inherited his lands and his obligations to fight
  • The castle was both a residence for the lord and his family, and a fortification. It was a strong place for the lord to defend himself against his enemies (and the king’s enemies, and his overlord’s enemies), a safe place for him and his knights to return to, and a place to live which emphasized his power.
  •   Castles were built to keep out enemies. When an attack was expected, the drawbridge was raised, the gates and portcullis were closed, and archers were stationed on the towers.
  • The walls were not only high, in a well-planned castle, but they were arranged as much as possible so that anyone climbing the walls could be shot at from two directions.
  • The castle’s defenses invited a great deal of ingenuity from the attackers. Rolling wooden towers, covered with thick hides to stop arrows and kept wet so they could not be set on fire, were brought up to the walls in an attack. Sometimes they even worked. Catapults threw heavy stones at the walls to make a breach or loads of rocks (or diseased livestock, or fire bombs) over the walls. The battering ram—generally used against a door—was an old favorite.
  • he knights and their servants and their mounts all had to eat, as did the lord, his family, and his servants and officials, and their families. Many castles grew certain types of food inside their walls, to add variety to the diet of those inside the castle, but it was not nearly enough to feed the people in the castle, much less their guests. Castles might have beehives, herb gardens, fruit trees or a fishpond. Because the land inside the castle walls was not enough to feed all these people, they got their food from the peasants who farmed outside, and from hunting. There were restrictions on hunting by the peasants, and sometimes it was forbidden entirely, so that the lord and his retainers would have plenty of game to hunt. Hunting was also a major recreation for the lord and his men.
hmcphillips h

Famines during the Middle Ages - 0 views

  • Medieval societies always feared having a lack of food. Crop surpluses were rarely enough to create viable storage systems and even the greatest lord could not keep enough grain to outlast a famine.
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    every thing you need to know is all right here!!!!
glever g

Medieval Clothing - 0 views

  • The clothing of peasants during the Middle Ages was very simple, while the clothing of nobility was fitted with a distinct emphasis on the sleeves of the garments. Knights adorned themselves with sleeveless "surcoats" covered with a coat of arms. Barbarian nomads wore clothing made of fur, wool, and leather. They wore long trousers, some of which had attached feet. Fine leather shoes were also worn. Imports such as turbans and silks from the East were common for the more fortunate of society.
  • As with today, clothing styles of medieval men changed periodically
  • At the end of the 13th century, the once loose and flowing tunics became tighter fitting. Besides tunics, the men also wore undershirts and briefs covered by a sleeveless jacket and an additional tunic. Stockings completed the ensemble. Men's medieval clothing also consisted of cloaks with a round opening that was slipped over the man's head. Such cloaks were worn over other clothing as a type of "jacket"
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  • kirtles
  • which were tunics worn to their ankles
  • Women, especially those who were married, wore tight-fitting caps and nets over their hair, which was wound in a "bun" on their heads. Other women wore veils over their hair, which was left either hanging loosely, or braided tightly.
John Woodbridge

Archaeologists might have found bone of England's King Alfred the Great - Yahoo News - 0 views

  • Tests have shown that a pelvic bone found in a museum box is likely to have been either that of Alfred - the only English king to have the moniker "Great" - or his son King Edward the Elder.
  • The bone was found among remains dug up at a medieval abbey in Winchester, southwest England, the capital of Alfred's kingdom.
  • The discovery comes less than a year after British archaeologists discovered the missing body of King Richard III, the last English king to die in battle in 1485, under a council parking lot in the central English city of Leicester.
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  • Alfred, who ruled the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, an area which covered much of southern England, from 871 until his death in 899.
  • Famed for military victories against ferocious Vikings who had invaded much of the north of the country, Alfred was buried at the Anglo-Saxon cathedral in Winchester but his remains and those of other royals were moved in 1100 by monks, ending up at the newly built Hyde Abbey. The abbey was dissolved in 1536 and the whereabouts of Alfred's remains and those of other members of his royal family thereafter became unclear.
  • human remains at the museum which had been discovered in a previous dig near the location of the high altar at Hyde Abbey between 1995 and 1999. Tests concluded the bone, about a third of a male pelvis, dated to between 895-1017 and belonged to a man aged between 26 and 45. As there were no other burials at the site in the Anglo-Saxon period, archaeologists concluded it had to belong to a member of the royal house of Wessex, and most probably due to the age, to either Alfred or his son.
  • However, more significantly, Alfred is regarded as laying the foundations for a unified England, and his passion for education and learning are seen a crucial in the development of the English language
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    Discovery of the remains of King Alfred the Great of England
John Woodbridge

Hidden Histories « Categories « Archaeosoup Productions Archaeosoup Productio... - 1 views

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    select the video entitled childhood and at the 6:30 mark a discussion of how children lived then.
John Woodbridge

Battle-Bruised King Richard III Buried in Hasty Grave - Yahoo! News - 0 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      Post-mortem means after death
  • post-mortem
Lily S

The Medieval Church - 0 views

  • very rich and powerful
  • organized like a government with laws
  • job of praying for everyone else.
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  • Monks were often teachers who taught noble children
  • Some even had the
  • The windows would tell bible stories and the lives of the saints
  • made of stone
  • provided spiritual guidance and a place were people could get an education
  • Almost all
  • Monks lived in monasteries or abbeys. They worked and prayed. Women could also serve a religious life as a nun
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    A good website on the Medieval Church
ben c

Medieval Health - 0 views

  • by the stars,
  • Health was controlled by the stars, and affliction was a sign of impurity of the soul-a curse from God.
  • Health was controlled by the stars, and
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  • Barbers doubled as surgeons, and a good bleeding was often the cure prescribed
  • Disease was a constant concern, as was infection from injuries
  • treatments for the sick were quite often out of reach, especially for the poor
  • Superstition and ignorance reigned during the Middle Ages
  • Hygiene was not always a priority and medieval diets were lacking in vital nutrition
  • Hospitals began to be constructed, and schools established for those wishing to practice medicine
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    Medieval Life
Mia K

Medieval Music - 0 views

  • Music was often played during holidays and special parties. During weddings and birthdays, the music was especially uplifting
  • Many a different Medieval music instrument was played, including, recorders, horns, trumpets, whistles, bells, and drums.
  • On Mayday, dancers would dance to specially-prepared, high-pitched music
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  • It was believed in those days that medieval music was not only delightful to the ears, but it also helped in the digestion of food, hence the reason for music at mealtimes.
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    This talks about music in the medieval times and how important it was in there culture 
Aman B

Medieval Health - 0 views

  • Health was controlled by the stars, and affliction was a sign of impurity of the soul-a curse from God.
  • Disease was a constant concern, as was infection from injuries
  • Hygiene was not always a priority
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  • Barbers doubled as surgeons,
  • treatments for the sick were quite often out of reach
  • But little by little, doctors were learning information that led to better cures,
  • Hospitals began to be constructed, and schools established for those wishing to practice medicine.
Srinivas P

THE MIDDLE AGES: THE MEDIEVAL PEASANT'S HOUSE. - 0 views

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    Peasantry house descriptions.
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