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Paul Merrell

Mozilla Acquires Pocket | The Mozilla Blog - 0 views

  • e are excited to announce that the Mozilla Corporation has completed the acquisition of Read It Later, Inc. the developers of Pocket. Mozilla is growing, experimenting more, and doubling down on our mission to keep the internet healthy, as a global public resource that’s open and accessible to all. As our first strategic acquisition, Pocket contributes to our strategy by growing our mobile presence and providing people everywhere with powerful tools to discover and access high quality web content, on their terms, independent of platform or content silo. Pocket will join Mozilla’s product portfolio as a new product line alongside the Firefox web browsers with a focus on promoting the discovery and accessibility of high quality web content. (Here’s a link to their blog post on the acquisition).  Pocket’s core team and technology will also accelerate Mozilla’s broader Context Graph initiative.
  • “We believe that the discovery and accessibility of high quality web content is key to keeping the internet healthy by fighting against the rising tide of centralization and walled gardens. Pocket provides people with the tools they need to engage with and share content on their own terms, independent of hardware platform or content silo, for a safer, more empowered and independent online experience.” – Chris Beard, Mozilla CEO Pocket brings to Mozilla a successful human-powered content recommendation system with 10 million unique monthly active users on iOS, Android and the Web, and with more than 3 billion pieces of content saved to date. In working closely with Pocket over the last year around the integration within Firefox, we developed a shared vision and belief in the opportunity to do more together that has led to Pocket joining Mozilla today. “We’ve really enjoyed partnering with Mozilla over the past year. We look forward to working more closely together to support the ongoing growth of Pocket and to create great new products that people love in support of our shared mission.” – Nate Weiner, Pocket CEO As a result of this strategic acquisition, Pocket will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Mozilla Corporation and will become part of the Mozilla open source project.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Mozilla 2016 Outlook: Promising Despite Funding, Competitive Woes - 0 views

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    "For Mozilla, 2015 has been a year of large challenges, with a shift in funding sources and increasing competitive pressures across the desktop and mobile markets. The biggest challenges for Mozilla, however, are likely yet to come in 2016. One of the biggest challenges for Mozilla in 2015 and into 2016 is funding; 2015 is the first year in a decade that Mozilla didn't rely on Google for the vast majority of its revenue. Mozilla signed a five-year partnership deal with Yahoo at the end of 2014 that went into effect in 2015."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Flash alternative for firefox | Firefox Support Forum | Mozilla Support - 0 views

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    "I am running linux Because of nice people in adobe I do not install outdated flash player for my system. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Mozilla blocks all Flash in Firefox after third zero-day | Computerworld - 0 views

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    "Automatically blocks even the current version of Flash patched July 8; users can sidestep the ban after seeing a warning"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Mozilla restarts work on multi-process Firefox | InfoWorld - 0 views

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    "After years of spinning its wheels, Mozilla recently stepped up work on separating page rendering from content in Firefox to make the browser more secure and more stable. Dubbed Electrolysis, or "e10s" for short, Mozilla's attempt to bring multiple processes to Firefox got a shot in the arm last month when Chris Peterson, an engineering program manager with the open-source developer, announced that the team working on the project had been expanded."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Can Mozilla Halt Firefox's Slide and Break Up the Mobile Internet Duopoly? | MIT Techno... - 0 views

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    "Firefox Maker Battles to Save the Internet-and Itself Mozilla helped an open Web flourish in the 2000s. Now it's struggling to play a meaningful role on mobile devices. By George Anders on May 22, 2015 "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

NSA - NoScript Anywhere - Next Generation Mobile NoScript for Android Smartphones and T... - 0 views

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    "What's NoScript Mobile UI NoScript Anywhere (NSA) is the nickname for the next major iteration of the NoScript security add-on (NoScript 3.x), whose guts have been turned upside down in order to match Mozilla's Electrolysis multiprocessing architecture and implement a porting for Firefox Mobile, available on Android smartphones and tablets. " [# ! The Acronym... # ! ... it's just a coincidence... # ! ;) # ! The #App is #security for #Your (#opensource driven) #device...]
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    "What's NoScript Mobile UI NoScript Anywhere (NSA) is the nickname for the next major iteration of the NoScript security add-on (NoScript 3.x), whose guts have been turned upside down in order to match Mozilla's Electrolysis multiprocessing architecture and implement a porting for Firefox Mobile, available on Android smartphones and tablets. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Reconciling Mozilla's Mission and W3C EME ✩ Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer... - 1 views

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    "May 19 Update: We've added an FAQ below the text of the original post to address some of the questions and comments Mozilla has received regarding EME. With most competing browsers and the content industry embracing the W3C EME specification, Mozilla has little choice but to implement EME as well so our users can continue to access all content they want to enjoy. Read on for some background on how we got here, and details of our implementation."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Driven by necessity, Mozilla to enable HTML5 DRM in Firefox | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "Mozilla announced today that it will follow the lead of Microsoft, Google, and Apple and implement support for the contentious HTML5 digital rights management specification called Encrypted Media Extensions (EME)."
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    "Mozilla announced today that it will follow the lead of Microsoft, Google, and Apple and implement support for the contentious HTML5 digital rights management specification called Encrypted Media Extensions (EME)."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Midori  ·  A lightweight, fast, and free web browser - 2 views

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    "On The Cutting Edge Midori is blazing fast, utilizing the latest web technologies and a small but dexterous array of extensions provide all the essential features."
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    "On The Cutting Edge Midori is blazing fast, utilizing the latest web technologies and a small but dexterous array of extensions provide all the essential features."
Paul Merrell

Mozilla Sets New Plans for Do Not Track Browser | Adweek - 0 views

  • Much to the disappointment of the digital advertising establishment, Mozilla is going ahead with plans to automatically block third-party cookie tracking in its Firefox browser. Mozilla first announced its Do Not Track browser in February, only to back off in May saying it needed to do more testing. But that didn't stop a growing chorus of loud protests from the advertising community, which argued that the browser would choke off the ad-supported Internet. The Interactive Advertising Bureau's general counsel Mike Zaneis called Mozilla's browser nothing less than a "nuclear first strike" against the ad community. No date has been set for when Firefox will turn on the feature, but advertisers, which have been regularly meeting with Mozilla and were hopeful for a compromise, are already lashing back at Mozilla.
  • "It's troubling," said Lou Mastria, the managing director for the Digital Advertising Alliance, which manages an online self-regulatory program called Ad Choices that provides consumers with the choice to opt-out of targeted ads. "They're putting this under the cloak of privacy, but it's disrupting a business model," Mastria said. Advertisers are worried that Mozilla's plans could be the death knell to thousands of small Web publishers that depend on third-party targeted ads to stay in business. Nearly 1,000 signed a petition urging Mozilla to change its plans.  "One publisher said that 20 percent of their business would go away. That's huge," said Mastria. "Mozilla is really picking business model winners and losers."
  • Not all cookies will be blocked under Mozilla's latest plans for its proposed browser; there will be exceptions. Through a partnership with the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, the two are launching a Cookie Clearinghouse. Overseen by a six-person panel, it will determine a list of undesirable cookies and then block those. "The Cookie Clearinghouse will create, maintain and publish objective information," Aleecia McDonald, director of privacy at CIS, said in a statement. "Web browser companies will be able to choose to adopt the lists we publish to provide new privacy options to their users." But others say the approach is far from objective. "What these organizations and the privacy groups that back them are really saying is 'let us choose for you because we know best,' " said Daniel Castro, a senior analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. "The proponents of this model have claimed they are empowering users. ... This is basically Sarah Palin's 'Death Panels' but for the Internet."
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  • Advertisers have so far resisted some of the Do Not Track proposals advocated by privacy groups arguing they are technological solutions that could quickly be rendered obsolete by the fast-moving Internet economy. When Micosoft launched its Do Not Track default browser, advertisers said they would not honor it. Meanwhile, members of the World Wide Web Consortium's tracking group, represented by advertisers, privacy groups and other stakeholders, have been unable to reach consensus about a universal Do Not Track browser solution. In Congress, where baseline privacy legislation has moved at a glacial pace, Mozilla's news gave Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) more ammunition for his Do Not Track Online Act. Introduced earlier this year, the bill hasn't gotten much traction and only has one co-sponsor, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.). "With major Web browsers now starting to provide privacy protections by default, it's even more important to give businesses the regulatory certainty they need and consumers the privacy protections they deserve," Rockefeller said in a statement. "I hope this will end the emerging back and forth so we can act quickly to pass new legislation."
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    Cookie Clearinghouse. Overseen by a six-person panel, it will determine a list of undesirable cookies and then block those.
Janos Haits

Mozilla Labs » Chromeless Browser - 4 views

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    The "Chromeless" project experiments with the idea of removing the current browser user interface and replacing it with a flexible platform which allows for the creation of new browser UI using standard web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript.
Paul Merrell

Firefox, YouTube and WebM ✩ Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog - 1 views

  • 1. Google will be releasing VP8 under an open source and royalty-free basis. VP8 is a high-quality video codec that Google acquired when they purchased the company On2. The VP8 codec represents a vast improvement in quality-per-bit over Theora and is comparable in quality to H.264. 2. The VP8 codec will be combined with the Vorbis audio codec and a subset of the Matroska container format to build a new standard for Open Video on the web called WebM. You can find out more about the project at its new site: http://www.webmproject.org/. 3. We will include support for WebM in Firefox. You can get super-early WebM builds of Firefox 4 pre-alpha today. WebM will also be included in Google Chrome and Opera. 4. Every video on YouTube will be transcoded into WebM. They have about 1.2 million videos available today and will be working through their back catalog over time. But they have committed to supporting everything. 5. This is something that is supported by many partners, not just Google and others. Content providers like Brightcove have signed up to support WebM as part of a full HTML5 video solution. Hardware companies, encoding providers and other parts of the video stack are all part of the list of companies backing WebM. Even Adobe will be supporting WebM in Flash. Firefox, with its market share and principled leadership and YouTube, with its video reach are the most important partners in this solution, but we are only a small part of the larger ecosystem of video.
Gary Edwards

Mozilla Standards Blog » Blog Archive » Fear and Loathing on the Standards Tr... - 0 views

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    everything we do here at Mozilla is, for the most part, a contribution to the Web platform. I blogged previously about the low esteem I reserve for arguments that favor proprietary platforms (which typically pit rapid proprietary innovation against dawdling Web Platform standardization cycles), but even in that upbeat blog post, I acknowledge that the standards process leaves much room for improvement.
Paul Merrell

Mozilla, ARM and Others Eyeing a New Class of Device | OStatic - 0 views

  • I read with interest this item, along with analysis from Matt Asay about Mozilla, ARM, MontaVista Software and four other companies working together on a new category of device. The partners envision devices that sit between smartphones and laptops, and they sound very much like the Ultra-Mobile PC (UMPC) tablets, such as the ones Nokia makes.
  • The new device from the seven partners might be on sale by early 2009, according to Softpedia. Their story also makes this good point about the difference between this new effort and Nokia's tablet strategy: "Arm Inc. is creating a completely open platform that will be shared with the open-source community ." If it is completely open that could draw the interest of developers.
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