Skip to main content

Home/ Future of the Web/ Group items tagged technology

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Social Media's Globe-Shaking Power - The New York Times - 1 views

  •  
    "As the technology industry came to grips in the last week with the reality of a presidential election that did not go its way, many in Silicon Valley landed on the idea that widespread misinformation spread online was a primary factor in the race's outcome."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

European Commision vs Microsoft: chronology of the case - 1 views

  •  
    "1998 Sun complains to the EC on Microsoft's dominant position as a supplier of operating systems for personal computers. 02/2000 EC launches investigation on Microsoft's anti-competitive conduct ("Case No. COMP/C-3/37.792"). Two main issues are under investigation: (1) lack of interoperability information, and (2) incorporation of Windows Media Player with the Windows operating system."
  •  
    EC v. Microsoft was a landmark advance in the law governing software interoperability. In the preceding case in the U.S., the courts refused to set a standard for the degree of "compatibility" that Microsoft would have to provide competitors. Forewarned, the DG Competition prosecutors had done their homework. Commission v. Microsoft, No. T-167/08, European Community Court of First Instance (Grand Chamber Judgment of 17 September, 2007), para. 230, 374, 421, http://preview.tinyurl.com/chsdb4w (rejecting Microsoft's argument that "interoperability" has a 1-way rather than 2-way meaning; information technology specifications must be disclosed with sufficient specificity to place competitors on an "equal footing" with Mictrosoft's own software in regard to interoperability; "the 12th recital to Directive 91/250 defines interoperability as 'the ability to exchange information and mutually to use the information which has been exchanged'").
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

"DRM is Used to Lock in, Control and Spy on Users" - TorrentFreak - 0 views

  •  
    " Ernesto on November 8, 2016 C: 5 Breaking In a scathing critique, the Free Software Foundation is urging the U.S. Government to drop the DMCA's anti-circumvention provisions which protect DRM. The foundation argues that DRM is a violation of users' rights, which under the guise of copyright protection is used to harm, control and spy on people."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Net Neutrality: BEREC on the Right Path, Let's Keep the Pressure on | La Quadrature du Net - 0 views

  •  
    "Paris, 30 September 2016 - Net Neutrality is one of central challenge in the application of fundamental rights in the digital space. Too often it has been only considered as a technical or commercial issue, but it has serious impact on the real e"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The Linux Foundation Partners with Girls in Tech to Increase Diversity in Open Source |... - 0 views

  •  
    "One of the great strengths of open source is that it provides opportunities for everyone. Regardless of background, age, gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation or religion, everyone can benefit from and contribute to some of the most important technologies ever developed. "
  •  
    "One of the great strengths of open source is that it provides opportunities for everyone. Regardless of background, age, gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, sexual orientation or religion, everyone can benefit from and contribute to some of the most important technologies ever developed. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Cybersecurity isn't an IT problem, it's a business problem - 0 views

  •  
    "The emergence of the CISO is a relatively recent phenomenon at many companies. Their success often relies upon educating the business from the ground up. In the process, companies become a lot better about how to handle security and certainly learn how not to handle it."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Is Biometrics Technology Safe? - 0 views

  •  
    "Biometrics is a step forward, but it increases risks. What happens when the digital code for a fingerprint, iris scan, voice print or facial geometry is hacked?"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Technology Changes; People Don't | Baseline [# ! Note] - 0 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! ... Pe@ple evolves... technology just helps... if used in a riight way. # ! Don't mistake the object with its uses...
  •  
    "As smart devices advance, they deliver more detailed, actionable data, but it's doubtful whether they will actually make any significant difference in our lives."
  •  
    "As smart devices advance, they deliver more detailed, actionable data, but it's doubtful whether they will actually make any significant difference in our lives."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

LinuxCon Keynoters Look Back and Forward at Linux's Achievements - 0 views

  •  
    "At LinuxCon, keynoters look back at 25 years of Linux, why the future is still bright, and why technology can have tangible benefits on the human condition."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

'Mutable' Torrents Proposal Makes BitTorrent More Resilient - TorrentFreak - 0 views

  •  
    " Andy on August 13, 2016 C: 39 News Behind the scenes, groups of individuals are trying to make BitTorrent better with steady, incremental updates. A new proposal tabled by P2P developer Luca Matteis envisions a tweak to the protocol that would allow greater resilience in the BitTorrent ecosystem."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Doing for User Space What We Did for Kernel Space | Linux Journal - 0 views

  •  
    "Jul 06, 2016 By Doc Searls in Community Identity kernel Privacy I believe the best and worst thing about Linux is its hard distinction between kernel space and user space. Without that distinction, Linux never would have become the most leveraged operating system in the world. Today, Linux has the largest range of uses for the largest number of users-most of whom have no idea they are using Linux when they search for something on Google or poke at their Android phones. Even Apple stuff wouldn't be what it is (for example, using BSD in its computers) were it not for Linux's success. "
  •  
    "Jul 06, 2016 By Doc Searls in Community Identity kernel Privacy I believe the best and worst thing about Linux is its hard distinction between kernel space and user space. Without that distinction, Linux never would have become the most leveraged operating system in the world. Today, Linux has the largest range of uses for the largest number of users-most of whom have no idea they are using Linux when they search for something on Google or poke at their Android phones. Even Apple stuff wouldn't be what it is (for example, using BSD in its computers) were it not for Linux's success. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

When Linux is the face of kindness | Opensource.com - 0 views

  •  
    "My late father, Lou Shapiro, was an early leader of UNICEF, so relief work was baked into the genetics of my family. His work was centered on emergency relief for the survivors of earthquakes and other natural disasters. Whenever there was an earthquake in the world, "
  •  
    "My late father, Lou Shapiro, was an early leader of UNICEF, so relief work was baked into the genetics of my family. His work was centered on emergency relief for the survivors of earthquakes and other natural disasters. Whenever there was an earthquake in the world, "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

"Piracy Monitoring Outfit Uses Flawed Tracking Technology" - TorrentFreak [# ! Note] - 0 views

  •  
    By Ernesto on June 12, 2016 C: 13 News Every day anti-piracy outfits monitor millions of unauthorized BitTorrent transfers. Among other things, the data collected is used to sent stark warnings to alleged pirates. However, according to a torrent site owner the tracking methods of these companies are not all foolproof.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Movie Companies Want to Destroy Massive Pirate Communities - TorrentFreak - 1 views

  •  
    " Andy on June 2, 2016 C: 8 Breaking Social networks are increasingly being used to spread copyrighted content but rather than take down infringing items individually, entertainment companies would like to take a broader approach. Should copyright holders be allowed to wipe out communities with millions of members to protect copyright?"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Who's Afraid of P2P? : The Corbett Report - 1 views

  •  
    " Who's Afraid of P2P? Corbett * 12/10/2015 * 10 Comments Podcast: Play in new window | Download | Embed Wired has allegedly found elusive Bitcoin creator "Satoshi Nakamoto" in Australia…and less than 24 hours later he's being raided by the Australian Federal Police. Sadly, given the attempts by the MSM and governments around the world to link the P2P economy to terror, mayhem and criminality, this is hardly surprising."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Facebook and Microsoft Are Laying a Giant Cable Across the Atlantic | WIRED - 0 views

  •  
    [Facebook and Microsoft are laying a massive cable across the middle of the Atlantic. Dubbed MAREA-Spanish for "tide"-this giant underwater cable will stretch from Virginia to Bilbao, Spain, shuttling digital data across 6,600 kilometers of ocean. Providing up to 160 terabits per second of bandwidth-about 16 million times the bandwidth of your home Internet connection-it will allow the two tech titans to more efficiently move enormous amounts of information between the many computer data centers and network hubs that underpin their popular online services. ...]
  •  
    [Facebook and Microsoft are laying a massive cable across the middle of the Atlantic. Dubbed MAREA-Spanish for "tide"-this giant underwater cable will stretch from Virginia to Bilbao, Spain, shuttling digital data across 6,600 kilometers of ocean. Providing up to 160 terabits per second of bandwidth-about 16 million times the bandwidth of your home Internet connection-it will allow the two tech titans to more efficiently move enormous amounts of information between the many computer data centers and network hubs that underpin their popular online services. ...]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

HTML5.1 begins to take shape on GitHub | InfoWorld - 0 views

  •  
    "The next generation of the Web standard is using a GitHub repo for feedback and suggestions"
Paul Merrell

The People and Tech Behind the Panama Papers - Features - Source: An OpenNews project - 0 views

  • Then we put the data up, but the problem with Solr was it didn’t have a user interface, so we used Project Blacklight, which is open source software normally used by librarians. We used it for the journalists. It’s simple because it allows you to do faceted search—so, for example, you can facet by the folder structure of the leak, by years, by type of file. There were more complex things—it supports queries in regular expressions, so the more advanced users were able to search for documents with a certain pattern of numbers that, for example, passports use. You could also preview and download the documents. ICIJ open-sourced the code of our document processing chain, created by our web developer Matthew Caruana Galizia. We also developed a batch-searching feature. So say you were looking for politicians in your country—you just run it through the system, and you upload your list to Blacklight and you would get a CSV back saying yes, there are matches for these names—not only exact matches, but also matches based on proximity. So you would say “I want Mar Cabra proximity 2” and that would give you “Mar Cabra,” “Mar whatever Cabra,” “Cabra, Mar,”—so that was good, because very quickly journalists were able to see… I have this list of politicians and they are in the data!
  • Last Sunday, April 3, the first stories emerging from the leaked dataset known as the Panama Papers were published by a global partnership of news organizations working in coordination with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, or ICIJ. As we begin the second week of reporting on the leak, Iceland’s Prime Minister has been forced to resign, Germany has announced plans to end anonymous corporate ownership, governments around the world launched investigations into wealthy citizens’ participation in tax havens, the Russian government announced that the investigation was an anti-Putin propaganda operation, and the Chinese government banned mentions of the leak in Chinese media. As the ICIJ-led consortium prepares for its second major wave of reporting on the Panama Papers, we spoke with Mar Cabra, editor of ICIJ’s Data & Research unit and lead coordinator of the data analysis and infrastructure work behind the leak. In our conversation, Cabra reveals ICIJ’s years-long effort to build a series of secure communication and analysis platforms in support of genuinely global investigative reporting collaborations.
  • For communication, we have the Global I-Hub, which is a platform based on open source software called Oxwall. Oxwall is a social network, like Facebook, which has a wall when you log in with the latest in your network—it has forum topics, links, you can share files, and you can chat with people in real time.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • We had the data in a relational database format in SQL, and thanks to ETL (Extract, Transform, and Load) software Talend, we were able to easily transform the data from SQL to Neo4j (the graph-database format we used). Once the data was transformed, it was just a matter of plugging it into Linkurious, and in a couple of minutes, you have it visualized—in a networked way, so anyone can log in from anywhere in the world. That was another reason we really liked Linkurious and Neo4j—they’re very quick when representing graph data, and the visualizations were easy to understand for everybody. The not-very-tech-savvy reporter could expand the docs like magic, and more technically expert reporters and programmers could use the Neo4j query language, Cypher, to do more complex queries, like show me everybody within two degrees of separation of this person, or show me all the connected dots…
  • We believe in open source technology and try to use it as much as possible. We used Apache Solr for the indexing and Apache Tika for document processing, and it’s great because it processes dozens of different formats and it’s very powerful. Tika interacts with Tesseract, so we did the OCRing on Tesseract. To OCR the images, we created an army of 30–40 temporary servers in Amazon that allowed us to process the documents in parallel and do parallel OCR-ing. If it was very slow, we’d increase the number of servers—if it was going fine, we would decrease because of course those servers have a cost.
  • For the visualization of the Mossack Fonseca internal database, we worked with another tool called Linkurious. It’s not open source, it’s licensed software, but we have an agreement with them, and they allowed us to work with it. It allows you to represent data in graphs. We had a version of Linkurious on our servers, so no one else had the data. It was pretty intuitive—journalists had to click on dots that expanded, basically, and could search the names.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The UN Foundation Builds a Better Tech Foundation - 0 views

  •  
    "The United Nations Foundation upgraded its IT infrastructure to support its mission and enhance global connectivity, providing maximum flexibility for its users."
1 - 20 of 90 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page