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Melissa Seifman

PBS Teachers | learning.now . Using Blogs as a Novel Approach to Engage Students | PBS - 0 views

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    Using Blogs as a Novel Approach to Engage Students

    by Andy Carvin, 9:45AM
Juan Quintero

Innovate: June/July 2008 - 0 views

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    Journal about innovate education
Juan Quintero

Publishing 2.0 - 0 views

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    publishing 2.o The evolution of media
Juan Quintero

Your Outboard Brain Knows All - 0 views

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    Your Outboard Brain Knows All
Juan Quintero

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • pleads
  • weirdly poignant
  • lengthy
  • ...39 more annotations...
  • strolling
  • wayward
  • struggle.
  • godsend
  • Research
  • telltale
  • Unlike footnotes, to which they’re sometimes likened, hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them
  • Marshall McLuhan
  • altogether
  • It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. It almost seems that they go online to avoid reading in the traditional sense.
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read.
  • above
  • When we read online, she says, we tend to become “mere decoders of information.” Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
  • etched
  • We have to teach our minds how to translate the symbolic characters we see into the language we understand. And the media or other technologies we use in learning and practicing the craft of reading play an important part in shaping the neural circuits inside our brains
  • readers of ideograms, such as the Chinese, develop a mental circuitry for reading that is very different from the circuitry found in those of us whose written language employs an alphabet.
  • subtler
  • You are right,” Nietzsche replied, “our writing equipment takes part in the forming of our thoughts.” Under the sway of the machine, writes the German media scholar Friedrich A. Kittler, Nietzsche’s prose “changed from arguments to aphorisms, from thoughts to puns, from rhetoric to telegram style.”
  • James Olds, a professor of neuroscience who directs the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, says that even the adult mind “is very plastic.
  • “intellectual technologies”—the tools that extend our mental rather than our physical capacities—we inevitably begin to take on the qualities of those technologies
  • “disassociated time from human events and helped create the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences.”
  • The “abstract framework of divided time” became “the point of reference for both action and thought.”
  • , Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation
  • widespread
  • The process of adapting to new intellectual technologies is reflected in the changing metaphors we use to explain ourselves to ourselves. When the mechanical clock arrived, people began thinking of their brains as operating “like clockwork.” Today, in the age of software, we have come to think of them as operating “like computers.” But the changes, neuroscience tells us, go much deeper than metaphor. Thanks to our brain’s plasticity, the adaptation occurs also at a biological level.
  • The Internet, an immeasurably powerful computing system, is subsuming most of our other intellectual technologies. It’s becoming our map and our clock, our printing press and our typewriter, our calculator and our telephone, and our radio and TV.
  • gewgaws,
  • thanks to the growing power that computer engineers and software coders wield over our intellectual lives,
  • “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”
  • For us, working on search is a way to work on artificial intelligence.”
  • Certainly if you had all the world’s information directly attached to your brain, or an artificial brain that was smarter than your brain, you’d be better off.
  • to solve problems that have never been solved before
  • worrywart
  • shortsighted
  • eloquently
  • drained
  • “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,
  • as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.
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    Is Google Making Us Stupid?
Juan Quintero

filtrbox : home - 0 views

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    Filtrbox actua como un agente inteligente, busca en linea nuevos artículos y contenido que impacta su negocio
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