Skip to main content

Home/ Classroom 2.0/ Group items tagged achievement

Rss Feed Group items tagged

anonymous

Critical Issue: Using Technology to Improve Student Achievement - 0 views

shared by anonymous on 23 Feb 10 - Cached
  • Technologies available in classrooms today range from simple tool-based applications (such as word processors) to online repositories of scientific data and primary historical documents, to handheld computers, closed-circuit television channels, and two-way distance learning classrooms. Even the cell phones that many students now carry with them can be used to learn (Prensky, 2005).
  • Bruce and Levin (1997), for example, look at ways in which the tools, techniques, and applications of technology can support integrated, inquiry-based learning to "engage children in exploring, thinking, reading, writing, researching, inventing, problem-solving, and experiencing the world." They developed the idea of technology as media with four different focuses: media for inquiry (such as data modeling, spreadsheets, access to online databases, access to online observatories and microscopes, and hypertext), media for communication (such as word processing, e-mail, synchronous conferencing, graphics software, simulations, and tutorials), media for construction (such as robotics, computer-aided design, and control systems), and media for expression (such as interactive video, animation software, and music composition). In a review of existing evidence of technology's impact on learning, Marshall (2002) found strong evidence that educational technology "complements what a great teacher does naturally," extending their reach and broadening their students' experience beyond the classroom. "With ever-expanding content and technology choices, from video to multimedia to the Internet," Marshall suggests "there's an unprecedented need to understand the recipe for success, which involves the learner, the teacher, the content, and the environment in which technology is used."
  • In examining large-scale state and national studies, as well as some innovative smaller studies on newer educational technologies, Schacter (1999) found that students with access to any of a number of technologies (such as computer assisted instruction, integrated learning systems, simulations and software that teaches higher order thinking, collaborative networked technologies, or design and programming technologies) show positive gains in achievement on researcher constructed tests, standardized tests, and national tests.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Boster, Meyer, Roberto, & Inge (2002) examined the integration of standards-based video clips into lessons developed by classroom teachers and found increases student achievement. The study of more than 1,400 elementary and middle school students in three Virginia school districts showed an average increase in learning for students exposed to the video clip application compared to students who received traditional instruction alone.
  • Wenglinsky (1998) noted that for fourth- and eighth-graders technology has "positive benefits" on achievement as measured in NAEP's mathematics test. Interestingly, Wenglinsky found that using computers to teach low order thinking skills, such as drill and practice, had a negative impact on academic achievement, while using computers to solve simulations saw their students' math scores increase significantly. Hiebert (1999) raised a similar point. When students over-practice procedures before they understand them, they have more difficulty making sense of them later; however, they can learn new concepts and skills while they are solving problems. In a study that examined relationship between computer use and students' science achievement based on data from a standardized assessment, Papanastasiou, Zemblyas, & Vrasidas (2003) found it is not the computer use itself that has a positive or negative effect on achievement of students, but the way in which computers are used.
  • Another factor influencing the impact of technology on student achievement is that changes in classroom technologies correlate to changes in other educational factors as well. Originally the determination of student achievement was based on traditional methods of social scientific investigation: it asked whether there was a specific, causal relationship between one thing—technology—and another—student achievement. Because schools are complex social environments, however, it is impossible to change just one thing at a time (Glennan & Melmed, 1996; Hawkins, Panush, & Spielvogel, 1996; Newman, 1990). If a new technology is introduced into a classroom, other things also change. For example, teachers' perceptions of their students' capabilities can shift dramatically when technology is integrated into the classroom (Honey, Chang, Light, Moeller, in press). Also, teachers frequently find themselves acting more as coaches and less as lecturers (Henriquez & Riconscente, 1998). Another example is that use of technology tends to foster collaboration among students, which in turn may have a positive effect on student achievement (Tinzmann, 1998). Because the technology becomes part of a complex network of changes, its impact cannot be reduced to a simple cause-and-effect model that would provide a definitive answer to how it has improved student achievement.
  • When new technologies are adopted, learning how to use the technology may take precedence over learning through the technology. "The technology learning curve tends to eclipse content learning temporarily; both kids and teachers seem to orient to technology until they become comfortable," note Goldman, Cole, and Syer (1999). Effective content integration takes time, and new technologies may have glitches. As a result, "teachers' first technology projects generate excitement but often little content learning. Often it takes a few years until teachers can use technology effectively in core subject areas" (Goldman, Cole, & Syer, 1999). Educators may find impediments to evaluating the impact of technology. Such impediments include lack of measures to assess higher-order thinking skills, difficulty in separating technology from the entire instructional process, and the outdating of technologies used by the school. To address these impediments, educators may need to develop new strategies for student assessment, ensure that all aspects of the instructional process—including technology, instructional design, content, teaching strategies, and classroom environment—are conducive to student learning, and conduct ongoing evaluation studies to determine the effectiveness of learning with technology (Kosakowski, 1998).
Nigel Coutts

The purpose of education - The Learner's Way - 16 views

  •  
    Behind the rhetoric and politics, education is about the outcomes it achieves for its learners. More than being about the nuances of technology, learning space design, curriculum structures and pedagogical practices schools should have effective answers to questions that focus on what they hope to achieve for their learners. How we answer this question should then dictate the measures we utilise to achieve these goals and it is to these ends that we must apply our efforts.
  •  
    Happy mothers day 2016 quotes
zebrians

Vantika Agarwal's Thriving Chess Journey - 0 views

  •  
    Ranked 1st in India, 3rd in Asia and 17th in the world in FIDE rankings, Vantika Agrawal last year became a gold medal winner in the Chess Olympiad in which India and Russia were the joint winners. Woman International Master at the age of 14, and gold medal winner at the age of 17, is a really astonishing thing to achieve at this young age, but this is how you will describe her incredible chess journey. From her very fast rise in the ratings to her consistent hard work as well as dedication, she is definitely on the fast road to being a great chess player. This young girl has achieved a lot in this short time as her achievements are speaking for themselves and also she has been even awarded by Hon'ble Former President of India Shri Pranab Mukherjee as well as Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi Ji. Her crowning glory was the part of the Indian team for winning Olympiad gold for the first time ever. Vantika Agrawal's Successful Journey of Chess Her journey of chess starts at a very early age as she won the gold medal in U-9 girls, Asian Schools Chess, 2011, Delhi. From there she has been winning one competition after the other. Participating in Olympiad, Vantika was lucky to get a place on the Indian team. Her strategy proceeding into the competition was to just give her greatest performance and contribute as much as she could to the team. She did that pretty well by getting 3.5/4 in the league stage, where India ended first, taking down a robust Chinese squad. As the Indian squad started into the playoffs, Vantika remained calm as well as confident. And when there was a tie in the final, all the players were happy and for Vantika it was really a dream come true. Even though it was online, but it was her first Olympiad. She even says that playing with her team has made her even more motivated. For more visit the website
marciabeard

Buy 5 Star Google Reviews - 100% Positive 5 Star Non-Drop ... - 0 views

  •  
    Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Introduction A fantastic option for companies to receive client feedback is through Google 5 Star Reviews. Customers can use it as a useful tool while selecting a company. Customers can discover more about a company's goods or services, customer support, and other information by reading reviews. What Is Google 5 Star Reviews? Customers can rank businesses on a scale of one to five stars using the new Google 5 Star Reviews service. Businesses with a rating of four stars or above will be ranked above those with a lower rating in search results, while Google 5 Star Ratings will also be displayed. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews To assist customers in locating the top establishments in their neighborhood, Google 5 Star Reviews was created. Businesses must register with Google My Business, add their contact information, and include their opening and closing times. Then, clients can provide a review of their interactions with the company. Why Need Buy Google 5 Star Reviews? There are numerous reasons why companies have to think about purchasing Google 5 Star Reviews. One of the most crucial elements in local search ranking is reviews. They assist Google in calculating a company's star rating, which is shown on search engine results pages (SERPs). A company's star rating can be raised with the use of Google 5 Star Reviews, which may increase exposure and click-through rates (CTRs). Reviews can also aid in establishing credibility and trust with new clients. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Businesses with better Google star ratings typically receive more clicks, phone calls, and foot traffic. In fact, companies with ratings of 4 or 5 get up to 70% more clicks than those with a 3. Your business can benefit from additional clicks, calls, and consumers thanks to Google 5 Star Reviews. The Benefits of Buying 5 Star Google Reviews? Customers are able to score their interactions with businesses on a scale of 1 to 5 stars using the popular tool known as G
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Introduction A fantastic option for companies to receive client feedback is through Google 5 Star Reviews. Customers can use it as a useful tool while selecting a company. Customers can discover more about a company's goods or services, customer support, and other information by reading reviews. What Is Google 5 Star Reviews? Customers can rank businesses on a scale of one to five stars using the new Google 5 Star Reviews service. Businesses with a rating of four stars or above will be ranked above those with a lower rating in search results, while Google 5 Star Ratings will also be displayed. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews To assist customers in locating the top establishments in their neighborhood, Google 5 Star Reviews was created. Businesses must register with Google My Business, add their contact information, and include their opening and closing times. Then, clients can provide a review of their interactions with the company. Why Need Buy Google 5 Star Reviews? There are numerous reasons why companies have to think about purchasing Google 5 Star Reviews. One of the most crucial elements in local search ranking is reviews. They assist Google in calculating a company's star rating, which is shown on search engine results pages (SERPs). A company's star rating can be raised with the use of Google 5 Star Reviews, which may increase exposure and click-through rates (CTRs). Reviews can also aid in establishing credibility and trust with new clients. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Businesses with better Google star ratings typically receive more clicks, phone calls, and foot traffic. In fact, companies with ratings of 4 or 5 get up to 70% more clicks than those with a 3. Your business can benefit from additional clicks, calls, and consumers thanks to Google 5 Star Reviews. The Benefits of Buying 5 Star Google Reviews? Customers are able to score their interactions with businesses on a scale of 1 to 5 stars using the popular tool known as G
  •  
    What Is Google 5 Star Reviews? Customers can rank businesses on a scale of one to five stars using the new Google 5 Star Reviews service. Businesses with a rating of four stars or above will be ranked above those with a lower rating in search results, while Google 5 Star Ratings will also be displayed. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews To assist customers in locating the top establishments in their neighborhood, Google 5 Star Reviews was created. Businesses must register with Google My Business, add their contact information, and include their opening and closing times. Then, clients can provide a review of their interactions with the company. Why Need Buy Google 5 Star Reviews? There are numerous reasons why companies have to think about purchasing Google 5 Star Reviews. One of the most crucial elements in local search ranking is reviews. They assist Google in calculating a company's star rating, which is shown on search engine results pages (SERPs). A company's star rating can be raised with the use of Google 5 Star Reviews, which may increase exposure and click-through rates (CTRs). Reviews can also aid in establishing credibility and trust with new clients. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Businesses with better Google star ratings typically receive more clicks, phone calls, and foot traffic. In fact, companies with ratings of 4 or 5 get up to 70% more clicks than those with a 3. Your business can benefit from additional clicks, calls, and consumers thanks to Google 5 Star Reviews. The Benefits of Buying 5 Star Google Reviews? Customers are able to score their interactions with businesses on a scale of 1 to 5 stars using the popular tool known as Google 5 Star Reviews. A written review can also be left by customers. Businesses need to hear this input because it can help them make improvements to their goods and services. Businesses are more likely to draw new customers if they consistently receive five-star evaluations. Potential clients are more inclined to trust a
  •  
    What Is Google 5 Star Reviews? Customers can rank businesses on a scale of one to five stars using the new Google 5 Star Reviews service. Businesses with a rating of four stars or above will be ranked above those with a lower rating in search results, while Google 5 Star Ratings will also be displayed. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews To assist customers in locating the top establishments in their neighborhood, Google 5 Star Reviews was created. Businesses must register with Google My Business, add their contact information, and include their opening and closing times. Then, clients can provide a review of their interactions with the company. Why Need Buy Google 5 Star Reviews? There are numerous reasons why companies have to think about purchasing Google 5 Star Reviews. One of the most crucial elements in local search ranking is reviews. They assist Google in calculating a company's star rating, which is shown on search engine results pages (SERPs). A company's star rating can be raised with the use of Google 5 Star Reviews, which may increase exposure and click-through rates (CTRs). Reviews can also aid in establishing credibility and trust with new clients. Buy 5 Star Google Reviews Businesses with better Google star ratings typically receive more clicks, phone calls, and foot traffic. In fact, companies with ratings of 4 or 5 get up to 70% more clicks than those with a 3. Your business can benefit from additional clicks, calls, and consumers thanks to Google 5 Star Reviews. The Benefits of Buying 5 Star Google Reviews? Customers are able to score their interactions with businesses on a scale of 1 to 5 stars using the popular tool known as Google 5 Star Reviews. A written review can also be left by customers. Businesses need to hear this input because it can help them make improvements to their goods and services. Businesses are more likely to draw new customers if they consistently receive five-star evaluations. Potential clients are more inclined to trust a
assignmentmates

How Do You Achieve Positive Feedback From Your Teachers - 0 views

  •  
    Teachers' positive feedback is very impactful for students' confidence development and positive character development. In academic life, students normally try their hard to achieve positive feedback from their teachers.
eflclassroom 2.0

How teacher turnover harms student achievement - 33 views

  •  
    new study with some interesting findings. the trouble is always, putting all these study/findings into our head and synthesizing it into some kind of workable framework. It is never just one thing that impacts student achievement.
  •  
    I am really confused by this abstract- it calls the assumption into question but then seems to assert the very same assumption??? Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, but recent evidence calls into question this assumption. Using a unique identification strategy that employs grade-level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 600,000 New York City 4th and 5th grade student observations over 5 years. The results indicate that students in grade-levels with higher turnover score lower in both ELA and math and that this effect is particularly strong in schools with more low-performing and black students. Moreover, the results suggest that there is a disruptive effect of turnover beyond changing the composition in teacher quality.
Angela Vargas

Business Contact Database: Letting Your Marketing Team Reach Their Metrics Easier - 0 views

  •  
    business contact databaseOrganizations usually give their sales and marketing staff a bunch of metrics to achieve within a set period of time. Giving them a deadline to complete such tasks allows the business to achieve financial goals, not to mention it gives them something to do. Examples of these metrics include total number of qualified sales leads to be generated, marketing ideas to be manifested, and most importantly the income generated from sales.
  •  
    Organizations usually give their sales and marketing staff a bunch of metrics to achieve within a set period of time. Giving them a deadline to complete such tasks allows the business to achieve financial goals, not to mention it gives them something to do.
  •  
    Examples of these metrics include total number of qualified sales leads to be generated, marketing ideas to be manifested, and most importantly the income generated from sales.
David McGavock

CITE Journal - Editorial - 21 views

  • A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. Technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for Technology in Education’s (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: Curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions—as accessible as all other classroom tools.
  • his urging to shift the focus from the learning tools to what is being learned and how that learning happens still needs to be heeded—almost 20 years later.
  • Integration is defined not by the amount or type of technology used, but by how and why it is used.
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • many of these technology-specific studies did not explore more fundamental issues in technology and education
  • what needs to be further developed, examined, and shared
  • particular curriculum standards-based instructional strategies that are appropriately matched to students’ learning needs and preferences
  • understanding the processes and interim results of how and why specific tools can and should be appropriated
  • help students with distinct needs and preferences to achieve identified learning goals.
  • the STaR Chart
  • According to the national StaR Chart, then, technology use in what is typically described as “constructivist” learning is preferable to technology used to “reinforce basic academic skills.”
  • Constructivists view people as constructive agents and view the phenomenon of interest (meaning or knowledge) as built instead of passively “received”
  • curriculum-based integration of educational technologies – defined in Education and Technology: An Encyclopedia (Kovalchick & Dawson, 2004) as “the effective integration of technology throughout the curriculum to help students meet the standards and outcomes of each lesson, unit, or activity”
  • As discerning educators and researchers, we should question why teachers’ roles “must” change to integrate technology effectively into K-12 curricula.
  • the technologies themselves do not require this shift
  • Though teachers in the nationally representative sample they studied acknowledged that computers helped them to change instructional practice over time, they cited experience, organized professional learning, and school culture as the primary factors provoking instructional changes.
  • In districts in which teachers’ academic freedom is preserved—at least in part—aren’t the pedagogical approaches to be used the result of decisions that each teacher makes, preferably rooted in a well-informed knowledge base of both students’ learning needs and preferences and corresponding methodological alternatives?
  • Can it really be assumed that a particular approach “works best” in all teaching, learning, school, district, and community contexts?
  • perhaps a new approach is warranted at this point in time—one that genuinely respects pedagogical plurality and honors teachers’ academic freedom.
  •  
    A classroom that has successfully integrated technology into the curriculum would be one where you would not really notice it because it would be so second nature. The teacher would not have to think up ways to use whatever tools were available, but would seamlessly use them to enhance the learning of whatever content was being covered. Technology [would be] used to assist in acquiring content knowledge, and the acquisition of technology skills [would be] secondary. Contrast this depiction with what the International Society for Technology in Education's (ISTE) National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS-S; ISTE, 2002) say about technology integration: Curriculum integration with the use of technology involves the infusion of technology as a tool to enhance the learning in a content area or multidisciplinary setting….Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions-as accessible as all other classroom tools.
Julianne Hoefer

SchoolsMovingUp - 0 views

  •  
    Tips for ways to improve student achievement. Schools on the move identifies high performing schools and explains what actions they have taken to reach their levels of achievement.
ashkif as

Display Your Academic Achievement with a Custom Diploma Frame - 0 views

  •  
    Get a diploma frame and display your achievement with pride! University Frames has been providing the finest quality diploma frames throughout the US since 1990. Choose from our available styles and designs - double diploma frame, diploma frame with a tassel, diploma frame with a portrait, and many more. You can easily customize the frame by choosing your preferred molding, imprint, mat, and UV protection options. Price may vary according to the customize options. Visit our website to customize ...
Martin Burrett

Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievement - 0 views

  •  
    "Parents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason. Their children's scholastic achievements at college lag behind the academic performance of same-age peers, a University of Zurich study shows."
Nigel Coutts

Assessment and Student Agency - Better Together - The Learner's Way - 4 views

  •  
    As with many things in education, the outcome achieved will be a result of all that we do. Efforts to promote and empower student agency, voice and choice certainly falls into this category. We might have the best of intentions but unless each of our messaging systems align, we are unlikely to achieve success. So where do our efforts go wrong and what else might we change so that student agency is genuinely a part of our learning environment?
Aman Khani

Keeping moving towards your goal - 0 views

shared by Aman Khani on 04 May 16 - No Cached
  •  
    Keeping moving towards your goal, you will surely achieve it. http://www.bigrock.in/
  •  
    Keeping moving towards your goal, you will surely achieve it. http://www.bigrock.in/
Diane Tillman

High-Quality Business Lists - Work with Nothing but the Best! - 0 views

  •  
    The quality of a business list can more than just fuel a campaign but also help it achieve success. For marketing campaigns that are heavily centered around using e-mail or direct mail, then a good list such as a mailing list or list of e-mail addresses of C-Level executives can really help to keep the campaign afloat and steer it into the right course.
  •  
    The quality of a business list can more than just fuel a campaign but also help it achieve success. For marketing campaigns that are heavily centered around using e-mail or direct mail, then a good list such as a mailing list or list of e-mail addresses of C-Level executives can really help to keep the campaign afloat and steer it into the right course.
  •  
    The quality of a business list can more than just fuel a campaign but also help it achieve success. For marketing campaigns that are heavily centered around using e-mail or direct mail, then a good list such as a mailing list or list of e-mail addresses of C-Level executives can really help to keep the campaign afloat and steer it into the right course.
aadityavarma

Paradigm IAS Academy UPSC , MPSC, UPPCS, MPPCS - 0 views

  •  
    Paradigm IAS Academy - Where Your Goals Are Defined And Achieved,India's No. 1 in IAS Coaching, UPSC & OTHER STATE PSC, UPSC, MPSC, UPPCS, MPPCS, RAS, BPSC, JPSC, UKPSC , Branches In Pune , Mumbai & Navi Mumbai , Classes Available in Hindi & English Medium
Fatima Anwar

UT Online Degree Programs Provide Quality Education To Achieve Your Career Goals - 0 views

  •  
    UT online degree programs offer quality education from tenured college with the convenience and adaptability you wish to achieve your career goals.
Carlos Quintero

Innovate: Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software - 0 views

  • Web 2.0 has inspired intense and growing interest, particularly as wikis, weblogs (blogs), really simple syndication (RSS) feeds, social networking sites, tag-based folksonomies, and peer-to-peer media-sharing applications have gained traction in all sectors of the education industry (Allen 2004; Alexander 2006)
  • Web 2.0 allows customization, personalization, and rich opportunities for networking and collaboration, all of which offer considerable potential for addressing the needs of today's diverse student body (Bryant 2006).
  • In contrast to earlier e-learning approaches that simply replicated traditional models, the Web 2.0 movement with its associated array of social software tools offers opportunities to move away from the last century's highly centralized, industrial model of learning and toward individual learner empowerment through designs that focus on collaborative, networked interaction (Rogers et al. 2007; Sims 2006; Sheely 2006)
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • learning management systems (Exhibit 1).
  • The reality, however, is that today's students demand greater control of their own learning and the inclusion of technologies in ways that meet their needs and preferences (Prensky 2005)
  • Tools like blogs, wikis, media-sharing applications, and social networking sites can support and encourage informal conversation, dialogue, collaborative content generation, and knowledge sharing, giving learners access to a wide range of ideas and representations. Used appropriately, they promise to make truly learner-centered education a reality by promoting learner agency, autonomy, and engagement in social networks that straddle multiple real and virtual communities by reaching across physical, geographic, institutional, and organizational boundaries.
  • "I have always imagined the information space as something to which everyone has immediate and intuitive access, and not just to browse, but to create” (2000, 216). Social software tools make it easy to contribute ideas and content, placing the power of media creation and distribution into the hands of "the people formerly known as the audience" (Rosen 2006).
  • the most promising settings for a pedagogy that capitalizes on the capabilities of these tools are fully online or blended so that students can engage with peers, instructors, and the community in creating and sharing ideas. In this model, some learners engage in creative authorship, producing and manipulating digital images and video clips, tagging them with chosen keywords, and making this content available to peers worldwide through Flickr, MySpace, and YouTube
  • Student-centered tasks designed by constructivist teachers reach toward this ideal, but they too often lack the dimension of real-world interactivity and community engagement that social software can contribute.
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning (Exhibit 2).
  • Pedagogy 2.0: Teaching and Learning for the Knowledge Age In striving to achieve these goals, educators need to revisit their conceptualization of teaching and learning
  • Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by: Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas; Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; andLearning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.
  • Instructors implementing Pedagogy 2.0 principles will need to work collaboratively with learners to review, edit, and apply quality assurance mechanisms to student work while also drawing on input from the wider community outside the classroom or institution (making use of the "wisdom of crowds” [Surowiecki 2004]).
  • A small portion of student performance content—if it is new knowledge—will be useful to keep. Most of the student performance content will be generated, then used, and will become stored in places that will never again see the light of day. Yet . . . it is still important to understand that the role of this student content in learning is critical.
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts
  • This understanding of student-generated content is also consistent with the constructivist view that acknowledges the learner as the chief architect of knowledge building. From this perspective, learners build or negotiate meaning for a concept by being exposed to, analyzing, and critiquing multiple perspectives and by interpreting these perspectives in one or more observed or experienced contexts. In so doing, learners generate their own personal rules and knowledge structures, using them to make sense of their experiences and refining them through interaction and dialogue with others.
  • Other divides are evident. For example, the social networking site Facebook is now the most heavily trafficked Web site in the United States with over 8 million university students connected across academic communities and institutions worldwide. The majority of Facebook participants are students, and teachers may not feel welcome in these communities. Moreover, recent research has shown that many students perceive teaching staff who use Facebook as lacking credibility as they may present different self-images online than they do in face-to-face situations (Mazer, Murphy, and Simonds 2007). Further, students may perceive instructors' attempts to coopt such social technologies for educational purposes as intrusions into their space. Innovative teachers who wish to adopt social software tools must do so with these attitudes in mind.
  • "students want to be able to take content from other people. They want to mix it, in new creative ways—to produce it, to publish it, and to distribute it"
  • Furthermore, although the advent of Web 2.0 and the open-content movement significantly increase the volume of information available to students, many higher education students lack the competencies necessary to navigate and use the overabundance of information available, including the skills required to locate quality sources and assess them for objectivity, reliability, and currency
  • In combination with appropriate learning strategies, Pedagogy 2.0 can assist students in developing such critical thinking and metacognitive skills (Sener 2007; McLoughlin, Lee, and Chan 2006).
  • We envision that social technologies coupled with a paradigm of learning focused on knowledge creation and community participation offer the potential for radical and transformational shifts in teaching and learning practices, allowing learners to access peers, experts, and the wider community in ways that enable reflective, self-directed learning.
  • . By capitalizing on personalization, participation, and content creation, existing and future Pedagogy 2.0 practices can result in educational experiences that are productive, engaging, and community based and that extend the learning landscape far beyond the boundaries of classrooms and educational institutions.
  •  
    About pedagogic 2.0
  •  
    Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee
J Black

Study: class podcasts can lead to better grades - Ars Technica - 0 views

  • Listening to podcasted versions of university lectures seems to be better for students than simply going to class, according to new research by State University of New York (SUNY) Fredonia psychologist Dani McKinney. Her study, titled "iTunes University and the classroom: Can podcasts replace Professors?" suggests that students who download the podcast version of a class tend to achieve better academic performance than those who don't, though it's more about what the students do when they download the podcast than the existence of the podcast itself.
  •  
    Listening to podcasted versions of university lectures seems to be better for students than simply going to class, according to new research by State University of New York (SUNY) Fredonia psychologist Dani McKinney. Her study, titled "iTunes University and the classroom: Can podcasts replace Professors?" suggests that students who download the podcast version of a class tend to achieve better academic performance than those who don't, though it's more about what the students do when they download the podcast than the existence of the podcast itself.
Elizabeth Koh

Study Ties Student Achievement to Technology Integration : April 2009 : THE Journal - 0 views

  • , the report showed that in high-need schools, there's been a 31 percent increase in the "innovative use of technology by teachers in core subject areas." What's more, in these schools, the report found significant increases in reading and math achievement (17 percent to 33 percent in reading and 18 percent to 36 percent in math).
  • 14-point increase in graduation rates, from 66 percent to 80 percent.
  • technology can help develop sustainable programs with short and long-term academic and economic benefits
J Black

The End in Mind » A Post-LMS Manifesto - 0 views

    • J Black
       
      This is a very profound statement that we should closely look at. Do LMS do nothing more than perpetuate the traditional classroom model?
  • Technology has and always will be an integral part of what we do to help our students “become.” But helping someone improve, to become a better, more skilled, more knowledgeable, more confident person is not fundamentally a technology problem. It’s a people problem. Or rather, it’s a people opportunity.
  • The problem with one-to-one instruction is that is simply doesn’t scale. Historically, there simply haven’t been enough tutors to go around if our goal is to educate the masses, to help every learner “become.”
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Through experimental investigation, Bloom found that “the average student under tutoring was about two standard deviations above the average” of students who studied in a traditional classroom setting with 30 other students
  • here is, at its very core, a problem with the LMS paradigm. The “M” in “LMS” stands for “management.” This is not insignificant. The word heavily implies that the provider of the LMS, the educational institution, is “managing” student learning. Since the dawn of public education and the praiseworthy societal undertaking “educate the masses,” management has become an integral part of the learning. And this is exactly what we have designed and used LMSs to do—to manage the flow of students through traditional, semester-based courses more efficiently than ever before. The LMS has done exactly what we hired it to do: it has reinforced, facilitated, and perpetuated the traditional classroom model, the same model that Bloom found woefully less effective than one-on-one learning.
  • Because the LMS is primarily a traditional classroom support tool, it is ill-suited to bridge the 2-sigma gap between classroom instruction and personal tutoring.
  • undamentally human endeavor that requires personal interaction and communication, person to person.
  • We can extend, expand, enhance, magnify, and amplify the reach and effectiveness of human interaction with technology and communication tools, but the underlying reality is that real people must converse with each other in the process of “becoming.”
  • n the post-LMS world, we need to worry less about “managing” learners and focus more on helping them connect with other like-minded learners both inside and outside of our institutions.
  • We need to foster in them greater personal accountability, responsibility and autonomy in their pursuit of learning in the broader community of learners. We need to use the communication tools available to us today and the tools that will be invented tomorrow to enable anytime, anywhere, any-scale learning conversations between our students and other learners
  • However, instead of that tutor appearing in the form of an individual human being or in the form of a virtual AI tutor, the tutor will be the crowd.
  • The paradigm—not the technology—is the problem.
  • Building a better, more feature-rich LMS won’t close the 2-sigma gap. We need to utilize technology to better connect people, content, and learning communities to facilitate authentic, personal, individualized learning. What are we waiting for?
  •  
    A very insightful look into LMS use and student achievment. Highly recommended read for users of BB or Moodle.
1 - 20 of 176 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page