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John Evans

From Fortnite to the classroom: the 'floss' dance craze sweeping schools | Tes News - 1 views

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    "Fidget spinners, dabbing, bottle flipping… teachers can find it hard to keep up with every new fad, so here's the low down on the floss dance and how to deal with it in your classroom."
Phil Taylor

Is Technology Bad for the Teenage Brain? (Yes, No and It's Complicated.) | EdSurge News - 2 views

  • Social media, contrary to its reputation, actually seems to improve certain prosocial behaviors—empathy, to name one—in teenage populations.
  • So we have a dash of “good news,” a pinch of “bad news,” and a potential framework to turn “no news” into “know news.”
John Evans

From fake news to fabricated video, can we preserve our shared reality? - CSMonitor.com - 1 views

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    "FEBRUARY 22, 2018 -From the instant replay that decides a game to the bodycam footage that clinches a conviction, people tend to trust video evidence as an arbiter of truth.

    But that faith could soon become quaint, as machine learning is enabling ordinary users to create fabricated videos of just about anyone doing just about anything.

    Earlier this month, the popular online forum Reddit shut down r/deepfakes, a subreddit discussion board devoted to using open-source machine-learning tools to insert famous faces into pornographic videos. Observers say this episode represents just one of the many ways that the this technology could fuel social problems, particularly in an age of political polarization. Combating the negative effects of fabricated video will require a shift among both news outlets and news consumers, say experts. 

    "Misinformation has been prevalent in our politics historically," says Brendan Nyhan, a political scientist at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., who specializes in political misperceptions. "But it is true that technology can facilitate new forms of rumors and other kinds of misinformation and help them spread more rapidly than ever before."

    So-called fake news has been around long before Macedonian teenagers began enriching themselves by feeding false stories to social media users. In 1782, Benjamin Franklin printed a falsified supplement to the Boston Independent Chronicle maligning Seneca Indians in an attempt to influence public opinion during peace negotiations with Britain."
John Evans

Teaching Current Events in the Age of Social Media | Edutopia - 1 views

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    "Four tips for including the news in your curriculum while helping students cope with the abundance of negative stories."
John Evans

The Future of Fake News | Edutopia - 1 views

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    "New audio and video software will make media manipulations harder to detect. These essential media literacy questions can help."
John Evans

factitious - 1 views

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    An online game that tessts your news smarts.
John Evans

How AI and Eye Tracking Could Soon Help Schools Screen for Dyslexia | EdSurge News - 0 views

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    "In an era of breakneck change and tech innovation, evaluating dyslexia in young students looks much the same today as it has in the past: A struggling reader's parents and teachers might sit down, gather information and assess the child on their strengths and weaknesses to determine a diagnosis and appropriate interventions.

    Often this is done via paper tests-despite the growing usage of predictive analytics in schools, where there are seemingly as many data dashboards as students in a classroom. All that's to say, it seems like an industry almost too tempting for deep-pocketed tech investors and an ambitious startup with an eye on using machine learning to trim the fat.

    "Today's methods are quite cumbersome," explains Frederik Wetterhall, the CEO and co-founder of Lexplore, a company that has devised a dyslexia screening tool that pairs eye tracking cameras with AI and algorithms. "With paper- and pen-based tests, it's quite hard to read the results and takes a lot of time. [Educators] ask, 'Who are the kids we think have difficulties?' and they miss a lot of kids.""
John Evans

Christiane Amanpour: How to seek truth in the era of fake news | TED Talk - 1 views

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    "Known worldwide for her courage and clarity, Christiane Amanpour has spent the past three decades interviewing business, cultural and political leaders who have shaped history. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Amanpour discusses fake news, objectivity in journalism, the leadership vacuum in global politics and more, sharing her wisdom along the way. "Be careful where you get information from," she says. "Unless we are all engaged as global citizens who appreciate the truth, who understand science, empirical evidence and facts, then we are going to be wandering around -- to a potential catastrophe.""
John Evans

How school leaders can combat 'filter bubbles' and 'fake news' | @mcleod | Dangerously ... - 1 views

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    "Information literacy has been a hot topic of recent conversation. Many folks believe that web sites that traffic in false information and 'fake news' may have influenced the last United States presidential election. Traffic on the Snopes web site, which debunks false rumors, has never been greater. Ideological separation also is being driven by the ways that we sort ourselves in our schools, neighborhoods, friendship groups, political affiliations, and faith institutions. Already often isolated from the dissimilar-minded, we then also self-select into individualized news media and online channels that can result in walled-garden 'echo chambers' or 'filter bubbles.'

    To combat our growing concerns about fake news and filter bubbles, we're going to have to take the task of information literacy more seriously. And that means rethinking some organizational and technological practices."
John Evans

Why Stubborn Myths Like 'Learning Styles' Persist | EdSurge News - 0 views

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    ""Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

    We should learn from experiences, particularly if those experiences show our previous beliefs to be untrue. So why are people so easy to fool when it comes to beliefs about learning?

    For years, a stream of articles have tried to dispel pervasive but wrong ideas about how people learn, but those ideas still linger. For example, there is no evidence that matching instructional materials to a student's preferred "learning style" helps learning, nor that there are "right-brain" and "left-brain" learners. The idea that younger people are "digital natives" who use technology more effectively and who can multi-task is also not supported by scientific research."
John Evans

5 Interesting Ways to Read the News Every Day - 7 views

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    "News has evolved, and how you read it needs to evolve too. It's not about going to one site any more. It's also not about reading through social networks.

    Reading the news today isn't as simple as it used to be. There is an information overload that you need to counter. Plenty of sites have their own biases that you have to manoeuvre. And lots of smaller news outlets have the most interesting articles.
    The 5 Best News Curation Apps to Fight Information Overload
    The 5 Best News Curation Apps to Fight Information Overload
    You've got so much vying for your attention -- news articles, Reddit posts, tweets, Facebook posts -- but what if you could get it all curated in one place?
    READ MORE

    So change how you read news: take small bites, track a single subject, or read the most trending articles. These sites and apps will give you an interesting way to consume news."
John Evans

Seen a fake news story recently? You're more likely to believe it next time - Journalis... - 0 views

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    ""Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President"; "ISIS Leader Calls for American Muslim Voters to Support Hillary Clinton."

    These examples of fake news are from the 2016 presidential election campaign. Such highly partisan fabricated stories designed to look like real reporting probably played a bigger role in that bitter election than in any previous American election cycle. The fabrications spread on social media and into traditional news sources in a way that tarnished both major candidates' characters.

    Sometimes the stories intentionally damage a candidate; sometimes the authors are driven only by dollar signs.

    Questions about how and why voters across the political spectrum fell for such disinformation have nagged at social scientists since early in the 2016 race. The authors of a new study address these questions with cognitive experiments on familiarity and belief."
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