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John Evans

Why Stubborn Myths Like 'Learning Styles' Persist | EdSurge News - 0 views

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    ""Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me."

    We should learn from experiences, particularly if those experiences show our previous beliefs to be untrue. So why are people so easy to fool when it comes to beliefs about learning?

    For years, a stream of articles have tried to dispel pervasive but wrong ideas about how people learn, but those ideas still linger. For example, there is no evidence that matching instructional materials to a student's preferred "learning style" helps learning, nor that there are "right-brain" and "left-brain" learners. The idea that younger people are "digital natives" who use technology more effectively and who can multi-task is also not supported by scientific research."
John Evans

5 Interesting Ways to Read the News Every Day - 7 views

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    "News has evolved, and how you read it needs to evolve too. It's not about going to one site any more. It's also not about reading through social networks.

    Reading the news today isn't as simple as it used to be. There is an information overload that you need to counter. Plenty of sites have their own biases that you have to manoeuvre. And lots of smaller news outlets have the most interesting articles.
    The 5 Best News Curation Apps to Fight Information Overload
    The 5 Best News Curation Apps to Fight Information Overload
    You've got so much vying for your attention -- news articles, Reddit posts, tweets, Facebook posts -- but what if you could get it all curated in one place?
    READ MORE

    So change how you read news: take small bites, track a single subject, or read the most trending articles. These sites and apps will give you an interesting way to consume news."
John Evans

Seen a fake news story recently? You're more likely to believe it next time - Journalis... - 0 views

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    ""Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump for President"; "ISIS Leader Calls for American Muslim Voters to Support Hillary Clinton."

    These examples of fake news are from the 2016 presidential election campaign. Such highly partisan fabricated stories designed to look like real reporting probably played a bigger role in that bitter election than in any previous American election cycle. The fabrications spread on social media and into traditional news sources in a way that tarnished both major candidates' characters.

    Sometimes the stories intentionally damage a candidate; sometimes the authors are driven only by dollar signs.

    Questions about how and why voters across the political spectrum fell for such disinformation have nagged at social scientists since early in the 2016 race. The authors of a new study address these questions with cognitive experiments on familiarity and belief."
John Evans

What is "brain hacking"? Tech insiders on why you should care - CBS News - 0 views

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    "Have you ever wondered if all those people you see staring intently at their smartphones -- nearly everywhere, and at all times -- are addicted to them? According to a former Google product manager you are about to hear from, Silicon Valley is engineering your phone, apps and social media to get you hooked. He is one of the few tech insiders to publicly acknowledge that the companies responsible for programming your phones are working hard to get you and your family to feel the need to check in constantly. Some programmers call it "brain hacking" and the tech world would probably prefer you didn't hear about it. But Tristan Harris openly questions the long-term consequences of it all and we think it's worth putting down your phone to listen."
John Evans

What is 'fake news,' and how can you spot it? Try our quiz - The Globe and Mail - 4 views

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    "It's a term with a lot of pejorative and partisan baggage, but 'fake news' describes a real problem: Media that's custom-made to fool you. Globe digital editor Evan Annett offers some pointers on how to avoid falling for hoaxes"
John Evans

News & Media Literacy | Common Sense Education - 1 views

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    "In today's 24/7 digital world, we have instant access to all kinds of information online. Educators need strategies to equip students with the core skills they need to think critically about today's media. We teach foundational skills in news and media literacy through our Digital Citizenship program, specifically through our Creative Credit & Copyright and Information Literacy topics. Built on more than 10 years of expertise and classroom testing, these lessons and related teaching materials give students the essential skills to be smart, savvy media consumers and creators. From lesson plans about fact-checking to clickbait headlines and fake news, we've covered everything. To learn more about our approach, read the Topic Backgrounder on news and media literacy."
John Evans

New Media Literacy: What Students Need to Know About Fake News - 3 views

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    "Fake news, unreliable websites, viral posts-you would think students who have grown up with the internet would easily navigate it all, but according to a study done by Stanford researchers, that couldn't be further from the truth.

    Researchers describe the results of the study done on middle school, high school and college students across the country as "bleak." Students were asked to judge advertisements, social media, video and photographic evidence, news reports and websites. Though researchers thought they were giving students simple tasks, they say that "in every case and at every level, we were taken aback by students' lack of preparation."

    As if that weren't bad enough, researchers go on to say, "At present, we worry that democracy is threatened by the ease at which disinformation about civic issues is allowed to spread and flourish."

    So what can educators do about the spread of fake news and our students' inability to recognize when they have been fooled? Lesson plans that explicitly address the new media literacy and task students to be responsible consumers and disseminators of news are a good place to start.

    Here are eight things that students need to know about fake news and the new media literacy:"
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