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Anne Bubnic

Mitigating the Internet's Negative Consequences - 0 views

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    For the last 11 years Marje Monroe and Doug Fodeman have worked to educate schools, parents and students about the issues that affect children in an online world. Their Web site, ChildrenOnline.org, offers practical articles, resources, research, and a monthly newsletter on the topic. Recently, the team, which has a long background in education, self-published Safe Practices for Life Online, intended to show middle and high school students what scams target them and how to use the Internet more safely. A teacher's edition of the book will be available through the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) in November.

Anne Bubnic

Facebook for Parents - 1 views

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    A course being offered at Stanford University that teaches parents "how to think" about Facebook. The web site includes five steps for parents and a newsletter.
Anne Bubnic

NetFamilyNews - 0 views

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    This highly respected newsletter by Anne Collier is pubished once a week and is must reading for parents trying to stay current with new about kids' use of the Internet.
Vicki Davis

Murder brings scrutiny to fast-growing Craigslist - 0 views

  • "There's a whole field of law emerging which is online media liability law and the question is how much liability do we place on companies that host information other people post online," said John Palfrey, a Harvard Law School professor.
    • Vicki Davis
       
      Online liability to companies that allow information to be posted is being discussed.
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    Home Business & Finance News Top News UK World Sports Technology Entertainment Science & Health Environment Motoring Oddly Enough Lifestyle The Great Debate Blogs Special Reports Video Pictures Weather Do More With Reuters RSSRSS Feed Widgets Mobile Podcasts Newsletters Interactive TV Partner Services Career Centre Professional Products Financial Media Support (Customer Zone) About Thomson Reuters RPT-FEATURE-Murder brings scrutiny to fast-growing Craigslist Sat Apr 25, 2009 12:28pm BST Email | Print | Share | Single Page [-] Text [+] "There's a whole field of law emerging which is online media liability law and the question is how much liability do we place on companies that host information other people post online," said John Palfrey, a Harvard Law School professor. "The general policy approach we have taken to the Internet starting a decade plus ago was to say there is basically no liability, but these recent cases put to the test that policy," said Palfrey, who is a co-director of Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society.
Anne Bubnic

Should Info on Facebook Be Grounds for School Suspension? - 0 views

  • School districts across the country have begun to punish students for the material that they publish online. Schools are correct for punishing students for online activities like character defamation of teachers and posting pictures of themselves engaging in illegal activities. Schools must teach students the hard way that wrong actions should be punished no matter where they occur.
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    Question posed in a high school newsletter: If a school comes across online material that depicts a star athlete or school government officer engaging in an illegal activity, should they merely ignore it? Surely, one's moral compass would dictate otherwise. Students must be disciplined for their actions in both the real and virtual worlds.
Anne Bubnic

MySpace, Facebook and More: Social Networking and Teens [Video] - 0 views

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    Safety tips for parents and teens from the folks at Common Sense Media. Do your teens love MySpace, Facebook or other social networking sites? Get tips on how to keep them safe. Great 4-minute video that could be shown to PTA/Parent groups or in the classroom at Back To School Night.
Anne Bubnic

Ten Ways to Prevent Cyberbullying [HotChalk] - 0 views

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    Cyberbullying is the practice of posting or sending harmful images or text via the Internet or other digital communication tools, such as cell phones, email, instant messaging, chat rooms, video game spaces or social networking environments such as My Space and Facebook. Following are some tips for parents and educators to help keep kids safe.
Anne Bubnic

Adina's Deck: Back To School Newsletter - 0 views

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    Learn the latest about Adina's Deck, the award winning cybersafety film, which now has two additional sequels. The team is available for school assembly programs.
Anne Bubnic

Online Safety, Privacy Tops Parents' Concerns - 0 views

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    A recent survey by Consumer Policy Solutions has found that online safety and privacy rank highest among concerns of adults online. The consulting firm which focuses on consumer interests and the marketplace, earlier this month released results of a survey that showed 56% of respondents don't think they have enough, or any, privacy online.
Anne Bubnic

Eight Ways to Handle Cyberbullies - 0 views

  • 1. Identify and blockFirst, ask your child not to respond or retaliate, no matter how tempting it may be to fight back. If you can identify who's cyberbullying your child, block any further communications.
  • 2. Set boundariesYou, not your kids, should also contact the bully (or bullies) and demand the offending behavior stop
  • 3. File a complaint Most cyberbullying behavior -- harassment, threats, invasion of privacy, stalking -- are violations of a web site or Internet service provider's "terms of service."
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  • 4. Contact the schoolIf you know the bully attends the same school as your child, teachers and administrators might be able to help.
  • 5. Send a certified letterIf you've done all you can and the bullying hasn't stopped, send the child's parents a certified "cease and desist" letter.
  • 6. Call an attorneyIn the worst case scenario, a lawyer can help you consider filing a civil suit against bullies and/or their parents for defamation, harassment or other causes.
  • 7. Contact the local policeIf there's any evidence that the cyberbully's tactics include criminal actions, such as hate crimes, physical threats or talk of brandishing weapons at school, contact your local police immediately.
  • . Talk with your kids about what's acceptableAnne Collier, editor of NetFamilyNews web site, an email newsletter about online safety for kids, says to truly stop cyberbullying, however, you have to first know what's happening when your kids are online.
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    Nancy Willard and Anne Collier offer eight ways to deal with cyberbullies in this article.
    1. Identify and block.
    2. Set boundaries.
    3. File a complaint.
    4. Contact the school
    5. Send the parents a certfied "cease and desist" letter.
    6. Call an attorney.
    7. Contact the local police.
    8. Talk with your kids about what's acceptable.

Anne Bubnic

Facebook as Pedagogical Tool? - 0 views

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    As online social networking becomes increasingly pervasive, Teaching and Learning News interviewed one professor who's embracing the technology and using it to extend the classroom communications. Dr. Jennifer Golbeck is Assistant Professor in the College of Information Studies who has found several advantages to an academic foray into Facebook.
Kate Olson

Friends Indeed? - washingtonpost.com - 0 views

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    great article on the new meaning of "friend" in the age of social networking
Vicki Davis

Search and Seizure of Cell Phones: Can You Hear Me Now? - 0 views

  • May school officials lawfully “search” the confiscated cell phone to look at stored text messages, photographs, videos, and logs of incoming and outgoing calls? Clearly, the circumstances of the search must satisfy the T.L.O. standard. Not as clear, however, is whether such a search violates federal or Michigan laws regarding stored electronic communications.
  • [A] search of a student by a teacher or other school officials will be ‘justified at its inception’ when there are reasonable grounds for suspecting that the search will turn up evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the law or the rules of the school. Such a search will be permissible in its scope when the measures adopted are reasonably related to the objectives of the search and not excessively intrusive in light of the age and sex of the student and the nature of the infraction.”
  • In Klump v Nazareth Area Sch Dist, 425 F Supp 2d 622 (ED Pa, 2006), a federal district court denied the school’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a student whose cell phone was searched.
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  • compensatory and punitive damages for the alleged unconstitutional search, violation of the Pennsylvania Wiretapping and Electronic Surveillance Control Act, invasion of privacy, and defamation.
  • The court ruled that the student had stated a claim for the alleged violation of his right to be free from an unreasonable search.
  • here was no basis for them to search the text and voice mail messages stored on the phone.
  • unlawful access to the stored voice mail and text message communications.
  • (2) A person shall not willfully and maliciously read or copy any message from any telegraph, telephone line, wire, cable, computer network, computer program, or computer system, or telephone or other electronic medium of communication that the person accessed without authorization. (3) A person shall not willfully and maliciously make unauthorized use of any electronic medium of communication, including the internet or a computer, computer program, computer system, or computer network, or telephone.
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    Legal Implications for Searching Student Cell Phones. Although this article is written against Michigan law, it does help clarify some of the concepts for what is permissable. Note that searching a student's cell phone or wireless device without parent permission may violate state wiretapping laws.
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    Confiscating and looking at information on cell phones by school officials is still not clear. This is a very interesting case study for those working with digital citizenship issues at their school.
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    Fascinating article explaining Michigan take on searching and confiscating cell phones.
Judy Echeandia

bNetS@vvy! Issue 6: Learning to Live with Texting - 0 views

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    bNetS@vvy is a bimonthly publication of the National Education Association Health Information Network (NEA HIN), the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, and Sprint. The bilingual newsletter provides resources from a range of perspectives to help adults understand the problem and connect with young teens to reduce the risks that they will become bullies or victims online. Lawyers, School Psychologists, Classroom Teachers and Teens contribute to the bi-monthly publication. Recent issues have covered Cyberbullying topics and Web 2.0
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    This issue of bNets@vvy focuses on texting and includes articles on: Understanding the Benefits and Risks of Texting, A Pediatrician's Advice for Managing Your Child's Texting Activity, Parents Share Their Strategies for Managing Kids' Texting Behavior, A Teen Talks About Texting and What Parents/Educators Need to Know About It, What's Up with Texting? A Teacher Asks Her Students to Clue Her In
Anne Bubnic

NetFamilyNews - Anne Collier - 0 views

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    Anne Collier has been writing about Family Internet issues through her weekly publication, NetFamilyNews for over a decade and her thoughtful opinions and analysis of noteworthy events are widely respected. Together with CBS Reporter, Larry Magid, she is co-author of MYSPACE UNRAVELED and co-director of the web site, CONNECT SAFELY.ORG. You can subscribe to her weekly publication. She also keeps a blog with timely updates in between publications.
Anne Bubnic

10 Facebook Alternatives - 5 views

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    If your kids are too young for Facebook, or you're concerned about privacy, consider looking into some lesser-known social networking sites geared for tweens, preteens, and yes, even teenagers.
Anne Bubnic

Should Sexting Be A Crime? - 0 views

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    Right now, sexting is a crime and kids can be prosecuted for distribution of pornography. And if a person is convicted of a sex crime, they have to register as a sex offender which will haunt them for years (talk about your permanent record...).\n\nIn Vermont, there is a movement to decriminalize sexting. We agree that kids shouldn't be prosecuted for essentially doing something really stupid. But we do believe it's up to parents to educate their teens about this really risky practice. Kids should know that anything they send can be redistributed in an instant to anyone and could result in tremendous humiliation and pain.\n\n
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