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thomas lloyd

Avoid Deceit in Salary Negotiation by these Do's and Don'ts - 1 views

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    DO your homework and review: Most people has nothing to say when they are questioned about their salary expectations. It's better to do your research concerning what the market rate for your potential position is instead of formulate an unprepared response. When researching, go through Westhill Consulting Career and Employment, Australia to find more about the salary levels for your profession and in the region. You may furthermore communicate with recruiters and contact people in your network of friends and colleagues who would be keen to share salary information with you to avoid scam and fraud. Applying all that salary cleverness as a starting point, you can squeeze it rendering on your own experience and qualifications and come up with a slimmer range that you can positively tone to the potential employer. DON'T say yes too soon: Taking the offer put forward immediately is unwise. Typically fresh graduates and job-seekers that are moving to a different geographical location make this error. Considering the salary offered against your actual worth is vital. Do not say yes except you feel that the offer is contemplative of the worth you will offer to the firm. Not talking might make you to feel underpaid, and receive lower increases and a sluggish salary growth as you move up the career ladder leaving you stressed and discouraged. DO think about other benefits: Talking about salary alone and disregard other benefits is also a usual error while negotiating salaries. Other factors must be well-thought-out such as insurance coverage, the preference of flexible work timings, maternity and paternity leave, paid vacation days etc. These aspects have monetary value devoted to them and should be grossed up with the salary figure to amount the value of your package.
thomas lloyd

Career Tips You Need to Disregard by Westhill Consulting Employment - 1 views

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    It is very common that you hear or read about this advice, "ask for promotion" because you won't get a raise or promotion if you don't ask one. Lawrence Polsky, Managing Partner of PeopleNRG.com, says you shouldn't ask; "not even at your annual review." Instead, use your actions to show you're a better leader. "Learn the business inside and out, generate team results that your boss can't ignore and create the most positive, supportive, entrepreneurial spirit in the company," he advises. "Then, when there is a need for a new leader, you will be asked. If you want to be promoted into a leadership role, and you think this advice is not realistic, then go get a new job in a new company where it is." Keep your resume brief has been told to us many times already. Make it short and prepare it in one page. Michael Morgenstern, head of hiring at the Expert Institute, disagrees and says, "Your resume reflects why you are best qualified for and deserving of the proposed position. If you've had extensive work experience, don't sacrifice highlighting your skills, talents, and expertise just to cram everything onto one sheet of paper. Your resume should be tailored for the specific job you are applying for, and each job description should emphasize the talents that you have developed and will bring to the proposed role." Or have you ever heard this, "A great resume will get you hired". But it contradicts as per Kyle Sexton, marketing strategist, says it's vital to focus on using your resume to get an interview. "Your resume doesn't need to be in chronological order or even include every job you've had." "Your resume is a marketing tool," he explains. "Use it -- along with your phone -- to get an interview. A great attitude and interview gets you the job, not the resume. Recognizing the different stages of the hiring process is critical to creating a tool that works well for its intended purpose."
thomas lloyd

South-East Asia beginners: what you need to know By Ben Groundwater - 1 views

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    It might start with Bali. That seems to be the entry point for many people into South-East Asia, their first taste of this incredible part of the world. You drink a few Bintangs, laugh at five people on a scooter, enjoy the food, get a little feel for the atmosphere - that mix of crazy and traditional, chaos and peace, commercialism and religion - and you're hooked. So for those wanting to extend their South-East Asian experience, to get more out of it than the Western enclaves of Kuta, this is your guide. First bit of advice: don't be afraid. You've probably heard some scams of dodgy goings on in South-East Asia, of protests in Thailand, of land mines in Cambodia, of scary roads in Vietnam and military juntas in Myanmar - but you're really not in that much danger. Don't, in general take minor complaints to the police as this will usually end up with you paying more than you have lost. While the chance of finding yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time does exist, in general South-East Asian countries are incredibly friendly places, and mostly quite safe. You'll be met with smiles rather than machine guns. You'll be treated with respect. If this is your first trip to South-East Asia, you're probably wondering where to go. Do you relax on a beach in Thailand? Or hit up Angkor Wat? Do you go island-hopping in Halong Bay? Or temple-hopping in Luang Prabang? It's a tough decision, but with a few weeks you can cover a lot of ground. Budget airlines mean it's possible to skip from place to place by air, to go from Hanoi to Siem Reap to Phuket to KL and Jakarta all in a regular-sized holiday from work. Of course this leaves little time for cultural immersion, but if your priority is to see the big attractions then you can do it all on a reasonable budget. Independent travel is simple in South-East Asia, with extensive networks of buses and trains which needn't be booked in advance. These buses and trains range from the comfortable to the hellish - t
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