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laganneela

What to do when your jobs a nightmare - 6 views

You don't have to talk to anyone else - you can just get the stuff done and then close work off for the day. Having something good to go home to each day would be a good idea too. Maybe treating yo...

What to do when your jobs a nightmare Westhill Consulting Career and Employment

thomas lloyd

Westhill Consulting Career and Employment Tips: Teaching English abroad "Under the Tabl... - 0 views

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    Westhill Consulting Career and Employment Tips: Teaching English abroad "Under the Table" Without a Work Visa - What Does it Mean? There are thousands of Americans teaching English abroad in dozens of countries around the globe likeBangkok in Thailand, Jakarta in Indonesia, KL in Malaysia or Beijing in China. What do 90% of them have in common? In addition to enjoying the international adventure of a lifetime,they are teaching English "under the table." In other words they are not legally working in those countries with a work visa. This is commonplace, even routine, in dozens of countries around the world, but it is not technically legal. The first matter is to understand that there are different types of visas that you will use to teach English abroad and that regulations vary from country to country. Please refer to our article, "What is a visa and do I need a visa to teach English abroad?" source: http://www.westhillconsulting-career.com/blog/2014/03/28/westhill-consulting-career-employment-tips-teaching-english-abroad-table-without-work-visa-mean/ What does it mean to teach English abroad "under the table," without a work visa? Typically the following:  You don't have official permission to work in that country.  You are officially working illegally.  You probably entered the country where you are teaching on a tourist visa (in many countries a tourist visa will enable you to stay legally in the country for 90 days) and in many cases, you will stay on and teach English on a tourist visa that has expired or lapsed (this will be the case in countries like Italy and Spain where tourist visas cannot typically be renewed). In such cases, you are not only working illegally, but you do not have a valid visa to legally be in that country either.  In other cases, such as Argentina, you canrenew your tourist visa or get a new one before your original visa expires (example day 85 of your 90 day visa), often by leaving and re-entering t
Daphne Chinn

What You Need To Know: Westhill Consulting Career and Employment Tips - 1 views

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    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=616670385079430&id=496648630414940&stream_ref=10 It might start with Bali. That seems to be the entry point for many people into South-East Asia, their first taste of this incredible part of the world. You drink a few Bintangs, laugh at five people on a scooter, enjoy the food, get a little feel for the atmosphere - that mix of crazy and traditional, chaos and peace, commercialism and religion - and you're hooked. So for those wanting to extend their South-East Asian experience, to get more out of it than the Western enclaves of Kuta, this is your guide. First bit of advice: don't be afraid. You've probably heard some scams of dodgy goings on in South-East Asia, of protests in Thailand, of land mines in Cambodia, of scary roads in Vietnam and military juntas in Myanmar - but you're really not in that much danger. Don't, in general take minor complaints to the police as this will usually end up with you paying more than you have lost. While the chance of finding yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time does exist, in general South-East Asian countries are incredibly friendly places, and mostly quite safe. You'll be met with smiles rather than machine guns. You'll be treated with respect. For more details check this out: http://www.westhillconsulting-career.com/blog/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Westhill-Consulting-Employment/496648630414940 http://westhillconsulting-career.quora.com/
thomas lloyd

South-East Asia beginners: what you need to know By Ben Groundwater - 1 views

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    It might start with Bali. That seems to be the entry point for many people into South-East Asia, their first taste of this incredible part of the world. You drink a few Bintangs, laugh at five people on a scooter, enjoy the food, get a little feel for the atmosphere - that mix of crazy and traditional, chaos and peace, commercialism and religion - and you're hooked. So for those wanting to extend their South-East Asian experience, to get more out of it than the Western enclaves of Kuta, this is your guide. First bit of advice: don't be afraid. You've probably heard some scams of dodgy goings on in South-East Asia, of protests in Thailand, of land mines in Cambodia, of scary roads in Vietnam and military juntas in Myanmar - but you're really not in that much danger. Don't, in general take minor complaints to the police as this will usually end up with you paying more than you have lost. While the chance of finding yourself in the wrong place at the wrong time does exist, in general South-East Asian countries are incredibly friendly places, and mostly quite safe. You'll be met with smiles rather than machine guns. You'll be treated with respect. If this is your first trip to South-East Asia, you're probably wondering where to go. Do you relax on a beach in Thailand? Or hit up Angkor Wat? Do you go island-hopping in Halong Bay? Or temple-hopping in Luang Prabang? It's a tough decision, but with a few weeks you can cover a lot of ground. Budget airlines mean it's possible to skip from place to place by air, to go from Hanoi to Siem Reap to Phuket to KL and Jakarta all in a regular-sized holiday from work. Of course this leaves little time for cultural immersion, but if your priority is to see the big attractions then you can do it all on a reasonable budget. Independent travel is simple in South-East Asia, with extensive networks of buses and trains which needn't be booked in advance. These buses and trains range from the comfortable to the hellish - t
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