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Matti Narkia

Seasonality of UV-radiation and vitamin D status at 69 degrees north. - Photochem Photo... - 1 views

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    Seasonality of UV-radiation and vitamin D status at 69 degrees north.
    Brustad M, Edvardsen K, Wilsgaard T, Engelsen O, Aksnes L, Lund E.
    Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2007 Aug;6(8):903-8. Epub 2007 Jun 27.
    PMID: 17668121

    The generally high dietary intakes of vitamin D, especially in winter, mask largely the effect of seasonal variation in UV-exposure, causing an atypical seasonal variation in vitamin D status. The UV-hour variable significantly predicted 25(OH)D levels in blood when adjusted for intakes and artificial UV-radiation exposure and sun holidays abroad.
Matti Narkia

Are sunlight deprivation and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute leu... - 0 views

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    Are sunlight deprivation and influenza epidemics associated with the onset of acute leukemia?
    Timonen T, Näyhä S, Koskela T, Pukkala E.
    Haematologica. 2007 Nov;92(11):1553-6.
    PMID: 18024404
    doi:10.3324/haematol.10799

    Month of diagnosis of 7,423 cases of acute leukemia (AL) in Finland during 1964-2003 were linked with data on influenza and solar radiation. Acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) showed the highest risk in the dark season. During the light season, the incidence decreased by 58% (95% confidence interval, 16-79%) per 1,000 kJ/m2/d increase of solar radiation. Independent of solar radiation, AML increased by 9% (95% confidence interval, 0-19%) during influenza epidemics. Reoccurring at the same time annually, darkness-related vitamin D deficiency and influenza could cause successive and co-operative mutations leading to AL with a short latency.
Matti Narkia

Hypovitaminosis D in British adults at age 45 y: nationwide cohort study of d... - 0 views

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    Hypovitaminosis D in British adults at age 45 y: nationwide cohort study of dietary and lifestyle predictors.
    Hyppönen E, Power C.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Mar;85(3):860-8.
    PMID: 17344510

    Conclusion: Prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in the general population was alarmingly high during the winter and spring, which warrants action at a population level rather than at a risk group level.

    Data from the 1958 birth cohort suggest that, at different cutoffs for hypovitaminosis D, a substantial public health problem exists in British whites. Obese participants and those living in Scotland were at the highest risk of hypovitaminosis D. However, the prevalence in the general population was very high during the winter and spring, which suggests that, to improve the situation, action is required at a population level rather than at a risk-group level. In the United States, calls have gone out for an increase in vitamin D fortification of foods (11), and the data from the current study suggest that such action is also warranted in the United Kingdom. Vitamin D is currently available without prescription as a dietary supplement only as part of cod liver oil or multivitamin products; hence, a need clearly exists to consider increased availability of over-the-counter supplements. Hypovitaminosis D has been implicated in the development of serious conditions, including diabetes, various types of cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, in addition to its essential role in maintaining bone health (1, 2). The high rates of hypovitaminosis D reported in this study suggest that immediate action is needed to improve the vitamin D status of the British population.
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